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y^nnuaf (Report 

2011 




(front cover) 



Architects rendering of new Wilmington High School. 



courtesy: Dore & Whittier Architects, Inc. 



Table of Contents 

Title Page 



Mission Statement 1 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Town Manager 5 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk 10 

Board of Registrars 11 

Town Counsel 11 

Board of Assessors 15 

Town Treasurer/Collector 16 

Town Accountant 17 

Public Safety Fire Department 36 

Police Department 39 

Animal Control Officer 43 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department 44 

Permanent Building Committee 46 

Department of Public Works 47 

Water and Sewer Department 52 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs Library 55 

Wilmington Arts Council 63 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 63 

Historical Commission 64 

Recreation Department 69 

Elderly Services Department 72 

Housing Authority 76 

Veterans' Services 78 

Board of Health 78 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 82 

Education Wilmington Public Schools 83 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc. Tech. H. S 108 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department 117 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 120 

Middlesex Canal Commission 121 

Inspector of Buildings 123 

Board of Appeals 124 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 128 

Annual Town Election - April 23, 2011 128 

...Annual Town Meeting - April 30, 2011 129 

Special Town Election - December 6, 2011 161 

Special Town Meeting - December 10, 201 1 162 

Directory of Officials 167 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 168 

Officers and Department Heads 171 

Municipal Services Guide 172 

Meeting Dates and Times 176 

Accepted Streets 177 

Telephone Directory by Department 




The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 




"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in order to deliver a 
wide range of municipal services to those who live, work or own property within the 
borders of Wilmington; and in order to make this community a good place to live, to 
work, and to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive to the 
needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. Principles of honesty, 
fairness, dependability and compassion must govern the actions of the officials and 
the employees of the Town. Those who work for the Town as employees or as 
members of boards, committees and commissions are recognized as its most 
important resource and the key to its success in serving the people of Wilmington." 



Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



Town of Wilmington 

Office of the 

Board of Selectmen 121 Gktl Road ^av ,ane\6*e ***a 

(978) 658 3311 FAX ( 97 ^) 658-3334 

Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 tty (978)694-1417 



Dear Fellow Resident: 



The Board of Selectmen continues to be actively involved in dealing with critical issues affecting 
the well being of Town residents. Together with a strong professional management team, the 
Board's mission is to ensure the delivery of a wide range of municipal services that are 
responsive to the needs of those who live and work in our community. Calendar year 2011 
brought with it a host of challenges to municipalities across the state not the least of which 
centered on finding ways to stabilize the local economy and to keep government affordable. 
Selectmen continue to espouse the principles of conservative budgeting and that has enabled 
townspeople to benefit in a variety of ways. There have been no proposition 2 1/2 operating 
overrides, no imposition of burdensome fees and no cutbacks in service. Selectmen are 
unanimous in their commitment to continue on the path of fiscal responsibility. 

Residents continued to demonstrate their support for a new high school by their overwhelming 
support both at the polls and at the December 10 th Special Town Meeting to authorize the 
construction of an $81. 5M 21 st century learning facility. Selectmen were united in their support 
of this project. Given the Town's current strong financial condition, the availability of funds 
from the Massachusetts School Building Authority, the favorable construction bidding climate 
and the obvious need for a new high school facility, Town officials and residents alike 
galvanized behind the project. The Board commends those Town officials and residents who 
continue to facilitate the advancement of this important initiative and we especially 
acknowledge the hard work and dedication of the High School Building Committee. 

The Board was involved with a number of important projects and initiatives in calendar year 
2011. Selectmen are responsible for ensuring fair and appropriate employment agreements 
that are mindful of economic conditions. During the past year we successfully negotiated 
contracts with the unions representing Public Buildings personnel, fire fighters, patrolmen and 
police supervisors. The contracts are fair and do not impose an undue burden on the taxpayer 
either in the short or long term. The Board was also successful in negotiating a fair price for 
the purchase of land adjacent to the high school that was owned by the Baptist Church. Special 
Town Meeting attendees endorsed the acquisition of the parcel which enabled the expansion of 
the footprint for the new high school. At year's end Selectmen were finalizing plans to purchase 
the former Yentile Farm property on Cross Street. The Town has had a long interest in 
acquiring this 20 acre parcel for new fields and open space expansion. In the early 2000's the 
asking price was prohibitive however with the assistance of the Town Manager we are prepared 
to enter into a purchase and sale agreement that requires the Town to pay less than $1.2M for 
the property. This price is approximately $2.6M less than the price paid in 2003. We are 
hopeful that 2012 Town Meeting attendees will support this important proposal. Pursuant to 
Town Meeting vote, Selectmen authorized the sale of surplus Town property on Faneuil Drive, 
the proceeds of which will be deposited in the Town's Capital Stabilization Fund. 



The Board of Selectmen spent several meetings working with the Board of Registrars, the Town 
Clerk and the Director of Engineering Services to update the Town's precinct maps. The 
Commonwealth approved the plan endorsed by Selectmen to revise the composition of the 
precincts in order to establish an equitable distribution of voters for each precinct. The end 
result is that certain voters will be required to vote in a different precinct and in some cases be 
required to change their polling location. 

Selectmen remain committed to protecting the Town's natural resources. In October Selectman 
Newhouse testified on behalf of the Town in support of legislation to exempt the Town of 
Wilmington from liability for actions taken by private parties at the site of the Maple Meadow 
Landfill. The Town continues to monitor the site while reiterating its position that the site be 
properly closed without the delivery of additional soil. The Town continues to work in 
conjunction with the New England Region of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to find 
appropriate solutions for the remediation and cleanup of the Olin Superfund site. The Town 
filed a strenuous objection to New England Transrail's most recent filing in August with the 
U. S. Surface Transportation Board thereby renewing its opposition to a solid waste processing 
transportation facility at the Olin site. 

The Town is pleased to report on the success of its Eurasian Milfoil treatment program that has 
been implemented at Silver Lake under the auspices of the Department of Public Works. In 
fact, due to the success of earlier treatments there was no need to apply milfoil control 
herbicides to Silver Lake during 2011. The Town's end of the year lake surveys indicate success 
in controlling this invasive species as there is a lack of visible milfoil in the lake. Selectmen 
endorsed a new roadway treatment program that reduces the Town's reliance on salt to treat 
roadways during storm events. The Town is urging the State Transportation Department to 
follow suit by establishing no or reduced salt zones on Interstate Route 93. 

Despite the slow pace of the project, the Board continues to work with federal and state officials, 
private stakeholders and its counterparts in Tewksbury and Andover to facilitate the Route 1-93 
transportation and economic development project. In April Selectmen signed a Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU) with the towns of Billerica and Tewksbury to share the design and 
permitting costs associated with the reconstruction of the Whipple Road Bridge. Funding will 
come from the Town's Chapter 90 Construction account. The execution of the MOU does not 
commit Town funds to the project's construction phase. 

Town Meeting voted to accept that section of state law which enabled the Town to impose a local 
meals tax. The action of the Town is compatible with most of our neighboring communities and 
in just a few months has proven to be a valuable and reliable source of new revenue. Town 
Meeting also authorized the Town to seek approval for the enactment of special legislation 
which would amend the Town Charter by eliminating the residency requirement for the position 
of Town Manager. Governor Patrick signed the Act into law on August 26, 2011 thereby 
providing the Town with greater latitude when selecting a Town Manager. 

For the second year in a row the Town of Wilmington was a recipient of the Bring Back the 4 th 
Grant and the Fire Safety Grant, two national contests sponsored by Liberty Mutual. Residents 
rallied to put Wilmington on top guaranteeing the receipt of two more $10,000 grants in 2011. 
The Town is the only community in the country to win all four contests. The effort put forth by 
residents on this project typifies the Wilmington community. Programs such as the library's 
community fair, the Relay for Life, the Chamber of Commerce and Women of Wilmington 
charitable road races and the newly established Farmers Market are all examples of the Town's 
partnership with and support of meaningful community events. Perhaps the most meaningful 
this past year however, was the Town's inspirational commemoration of the 10 th anniversary of 
9/11. This singular event captured the essence of our Town and will long be remembered as a 
poignant and meaningful moment in Wilmington's history. 



The past year we sadly laid to rest an exemplary employee who worked as a police officer. 
Shawn Lee brought great pride to the uniform and he will be sorely missed. Shawn's work was 
typical of so many outstanding employees who the Board readily acknowledges, and extends its 
appreciation to, for their hard work. We thank all of our colleagues on the various boards and 
committees who volunteer their time on behalf of the community. We especially thank the 
residents who make Wilmington a special place in which to live. Finally, we acknowledge the 
work of the Town Manager Michael Caira, Assistant Town Manager Jeffrey Hull, 
Administrative Assistant and Secretary to the Board of Selectmen Beverly Dalton and the 
Manager's entire administrative team for their diligence and professionalism. Next year 
Selectmen will undertake the replacement of Wilmington's longest serving Town Manager, 
Michael Caira. We are indebted to him for his years of tireless and exemplary service. The 
residents may be assured that the Board will choose his successor focused, as always, on what is 
best for the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Louis Cimaglia, IV, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 




Board of Selectmen from left, Michael V. McCoy, Michael ]. Newhouse, 
Louis Cimaglia, IV, Chairman, Judith L. O'Connell and Michael L. Champoux 




Office of the 
Town Manager 
(978) 658-3311 



Town of Wilmington 

121 Glen Road 
Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 



FAX 
TTY 



(978) 658-3334 
(978)694-1417 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

There is little doubt that the most significant and far reaching decision made by the Town of 
Wilmington occurred just prior to the end of the 201 1 calendar year. By an unprecedented 
margin, voters overwhelmingly approved both the plans and the financing for the construction 
of a new Wilmington High School. More than 75% of the 5,016 residents who cast ballots in the 
December 6, 2011 Special Election voted in favor of a proposition 2 1/2 debt exclusion. The vote, 
3,778 - 1,238, provides the Town with temporary additional taxing capacity enabling the Town 
to raise funds in excess of its levy limit. 

The Town spoke with a near singular voice the following Saturday, December 10th, when nearly 
98% of Special Town Meeting attendees (1,426-31) voted to appropriate $81. 5M to construct a 
new high school on the same grounds of the current site. The project is being financed jointly 
with the Massachusetts School Building Authority, the state agency that will provide the Town 
with $38M in funding. The Town estimates that over the life of the 25 year bond that will be 
issued to finance the Town's share of the project, the average annual cost to the homeowner , 
based upon the average residential property value, will be approximately $164. 

The new high school will increase in size from 154,000 s.f. to just over 192,000 s.f. The high 
school is being designed to support 21st century learning with state-of-the-art mechanical and 
structural systems. The building will be fully air conditioned and heated by natural gas. It will 
meet the needs of present day educational programs and be designed to provide flexibility and 
functionality for future changes. The school will accommodate the growing use of technology, 
including wireless infrastructure, provide appropriate space for special education and student 
support services and offer flexible classrooms that are designed for large and small group 
instruction as well as quiet study and for interdisciplinary work. The building will include up- 
to-date science classrooms with modern laboratories to ensure high quality science education; 
expanded and improved visual arts, business and family consumer science classrooms; and a 
media production room for hosting multiple classes of students at one time for lectures, 
productions and distance learning opportunities. 

Other features of the new school include: 

* A large interior courtyard that will connect to classrooms, the library/media center and 
the cafeteria and will allow natural light into all classrooms as well as provide outdoor 
seating for the cafeteria in the nicer weather. 

* A state-of-the-art auditorium with greater seating capacity and a larger stage to better 
accommodate student concerts and performing arts' productions. 

* A modern gymnasium with an elevated track to support the wellness curriculum and 
winter sports teams. 

* Enhanced locker, weight and fitness rooms. 

* A new utility sports field, an improved track surface and a new artificial turf field for 
Alumni Stadium. 



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* New outside tennis and basketball courts. 

* A sustainable designed building which will achieve energy efficiency and a LEED® Silver 
rating. 

* Improved parking and student drop-off areas. 

Construction on the new building is slated to begin in early fall of 2012. The facility is expected 
to be substantially complete in early summer of 2014 and ready for occupancy by students and 
staff for the beginning of school in August of 2014. 

Congratulations to Chairman Joanne Benton and the members of the High School Building 
Committee, to the members of the numerous working groups, to school and town officials, to the 
professional design and project management team and especially to the residents, all of whom 
should justifiably take ownership of this most amazing collaborative effort. We are confident 
that the finished product will exceed expectations and become the 21 st century learning facility 
that our students deserve. 

The Town's policy of conservative budgeting has served the community well during what has 
been an extended period of economic uncertainty. The Town's strong financial condition enables 
Wilmington to meet everyday operational needs without reducing important services, imposing 
onerous fees or seeking proposition 2 1/2 operating budget overrides. 

There are a number of positive local economic indicators that position the Town to meet its 
capital investment objectives while maintaining strong financial reserves. The Town's 
municipal bond rating was reconfirmed at AA+. After retiring its long-term debt in 2011, the 
Town issued $4.5 million in new debt for capital projects and equipment at an interest rate of 
2.76%. The Town has balanced its budgets since fiscal year 2008 without relying on free cash. 
The most recent certification of available funds in the Town's General Fund was calculated at 
just under $9.5 million, the highest in its history, representing an increase of over $2.8 million 
from the prior year's Department of Revenue certification. 

Maintaining substantial financial reserves enables the Town to meet future obligations, 
particularly those that pertain to operational and maintenance costs associated with new or 
renovated school and municipal buildings, advances in technology, building and infrastructure 
improvements, capital equipment and for the acquisition of fields and open space. Pertinent to 
the latter example, the Board of Selectmen is in the process of negotiating the purchase of the 
former Yentile Farm property on Cross Street to expand the Town's inventory of field and open 
space. The purchase, if approved at Town Meeting, would be funded from the Town's reserve. 
There would be no request for new taxes nor would there be a need to rely on a borrowing 
authorization. 

Voters at the 2011 Annual Town Meeting adopted the local meals tax option providing the Town 
with a reliable new source of revenue. Based on the initial four months of receipts, the Town • 
anticipates generating an annual revenue stream of $250,000. 

While the national economy remains sluggish, the Massachusetts economy has shown recent 
signs of growth. In Wilmington, that also appears to be true as evidenced by the opening of 
restaurants and other retail and service related businesses in 2011. The housing market, 
although not flourishing, has also demonstrated signs of recovery. By the close of 2011, two 
major development projects have re-emerged after being in a "hold pattern". These include 
Target's plan to anchor a retail center on Ballardvale Street and the 108 unit apartment 
housing development at 10 Burlington Avenue whose sitework has finally begun. Also at year's 
end, the Town has learned of possible expansion plans for Analog Devices at their Woburn 
Street/Industrial Way campus. Analog Devices recently acquired a 13 acre site adjacent to their 
property that would enable them to consider expansion opportunities. 



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The delivery of quality municipal services requires an annual investment in the Town's 
infrastructure, facilities and equipment. In 2011, Town Meeting authorized the purchase of 
several replacement maintenance and construction vehicles for the Departments of Public 
Works and Public Buildings including a heavy duty catch basin cleaner truck. In March the 
Town took possession of a state-of-the-art ambulance and currently awaits the delivery of a 
rapid response vehicle. The Town replaced five frontline police cruisers to ensure its ability to 
quickly and safely respond to emergencies. In addition, the Town addressed several public 
safety needs through the acquisition of additional automated external defibrillators, a LUCAS 
chest compression system, new radios to assist in meeting federal mandates for narrow banding 
and digital compliance, a replacement 

computer aided emergency dispatch system and a heavy duty extractor and dryer to ensure fire 
fighter safety and to comply with National Fire Protection Association standards. The Town 
also purchased replacement wheelchair accessible transport vans for both the School 
Department and the Department of Elderly Services. 

In 2011 several important infrastructure projects both in the traditional sense and in terms of 
technological improvements took place. The Fire Department's project to replace the outdated 
wire line fire alarm system with a new wireless system nears completion. The new system will 
eliminate the need for ongoing maintenance of a wire based system and will generate 
approximately $20,000 a year in new revenue. This past year saw the town-wide installation of 
a fully redundant fiber optic municipal area network serving School and Town sites that was 
principally funded by available School Department funds and supplemented by Water Receipts 
and Town operating budgets. The network has strengthened the Town's ability to communicate 
and transmit data electronically and enhances the School Department's ability to offer a wider 
range of technology applications for its students and staff. 

The Town undertook a number of other significant infrastructure improvement projects in 2011. 
They included: 

* The completion of Phase I of the Lawrence Street Sidewalk Project wherein 
approximately 1,960 linear feet of new bituminous sidewalks are being constructed. 

* The resurfacing and reconstruction of approximately 4.5 miles of roadways throughout 
the Town. 

* The replacement of culverts on Shady Lane Drive and West Street. 

* The completion of the Brown's Crossing Wellfield Replacement Project. 

* The replacement of a 1,500 foot section of water main on Eames Street. 

Improving the quality of fields and recreation space continues to be a Town priority. In the fall 
of 2011, the Town opened a reconstructed soccer field behind the former White field School that 
includes a newly installed field irrigation system. Repairs to the skate ramps at the Justin A. 
O'Neil Memorial Skate Park and a comprehensive safety check of the entire park was 
performed by trained skate park maintenance technicians. During the fall the tennis and 
basketball courts at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center were resurfaced and new chain link 
fence was installed around the perimeter of the courts at both the Boutwell and Woburn Street 
Schools. 

Improving municipal facilities in order to extend their useful life continues to be a priority for 
the Town. Among the improvements to School and Town buildings in 2011 were the following: 

* Installation of new roofs on the 4 th of July Building; Public Buildings Headquarters; 
Department of Public Works garage and office area; Sargent Water Treatment Plant and 
on a section of the Wildwood Early Childhood Center. 



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* Replacement of exterior windows and doors with energy efficient systems at the 
Shawsheen Elementary School. This project was funded with a 50% matching grant 
from the Massachusetts School Building Authority through its Green Repair program. 

* Replacement of the roof and signage on the overhang at the front entrance of the 
Shawsheen Elementary School. 

* Installation of radio controlled fire alarm master boxes in municipal and school 
buildings to replace the old hardwired system. 

* Upgrade of security sytems at the Shawsheen and Woburn Street Schools. 

Voters at the 2011 Annual Town Meeting appropriated funds to install new life safety fire alarm 
systems at the Woburn Street and North Intermediate Schools. Both projects have been 
designed and put out to bid and are expected to be completed in the spring of 2012. 

In 2011, the Department of Public Works concluded an extremely busy year dealing with the 
difficult weather that included snowfall totaling over 100 inches, wind and flooding damage 
from Tropical Storm Irene and severe tree damage from the late October snowstorm. The Town 
implemented its multi-year Stormwater Management Plan; updated its precinct maps; adopted 
by-laws to govern the regulation of pawn brokers and junk dealers; established a curfew for 
activity on Town parks and playgrounds; and approved a change to the Town Charter 
eliminating the residency requirement for the Town Manager. 

The Wilmington Police Department underwent a rigorous assessment process to become the 
35 th municipal force to earn state accreditation from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation 
Commission. Also in 2011, the Police Department was awarded first place in the Gold category 
in the 2011 Massachusetts Law Enforcement Challenge. The good work of every Town 
department is summarized in the Town's Annual Report. These reports best detail the 
activities, accomplishments and mission of each component of Town government and include 
commentary on the Town's diverse and ever-expanding program offerings. 

Wilmington reveres its unique traditions such as The Horribles Parade, the Easter Egg Hunt or 
the perfect 4 th of July celebration. Volunteers comprise the backbone of a myriad of special 
Wilmington events both old and new. The Sarah Carter Lecture Fund series held its 101 st 
annual program in October, the Wilmington Arts Council conducted its 31 st annual art show in 
June and the Buzzell Senior Center celebrated its 25 th anniversary in April. On the newer end 
of the spectrum but certain to blossom into long-standing community traditions, the Wilmington 
Relay for Life held its third successful event in June, the Wilmington Library conducted its 2 nd 
annual community fair in September and the Wilmington Farmers Market opened its inaugural 
season on the Swain Green in July. 

The partnership between Town government and the community at large is exemplified by the 
amount and diversity of shared endeavors and accomplishments. Perhaps no better example of 
Wilmington's unique community spirit was its solemn yet uplifting commemoration of the l0 lil 
anniversary of 9/11. In partnership with the Wilmington Council of Churches, several hundred 
townspeople gathered at St. Thomas Church and later at the Town Common to remember the 
tragic events of that day and to reflect on the goodness of America. They gathered to keep alive 
the memories of those who lost their lives and to comfort those innocent victims who were left 
with an unspeakable void in their own life. They gathered as well to honor the heroes among us 
whose bravery and selfless acts of courage shone brightly during America's darkest hour and 
reminded us of the words of Winston Churchill who said, "Courage is rightly esteemed the first 
of human qualities... because it is the quality that guarantees all others". 



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We are profoundly grateful to the many individuals who volunteer their time and expertise in 
local government services. The wheels of government would grind to a halt if it were not for the 
willingness of so many Wilmington residents to serve their government by participating on vital 
boards and committees. We especially acknowledge those who concluded such service this past 
year including Thomas Siracusa of the Conservation Commission, Joseph Langone of the 
Permanent Building Committee, Carol Hulburt of the Elderly Services Commission and 
Stephen Berghaus who served as a member of the Cemetery Commission. We also mourn the 
passing of H. Elizabeth White who dedicated so much of her time to ensuring the perpetuation 
of the Carter Lecture Fund series. She is also remembered for her promotion of the Arts 
through her longtime membership on the Wilmington Arts Council. 

Several municipal employees retired this past year including the Town's longest serving 
employee, Susan MacDonald. Susan began her career in the library as a page and retired as 
Children's Librarian after 41 years of service. Carolyn Kenney and Phyllis Vieira, familiar to 
most everyone who visited Town Hall, retired after 38 and 36 years of service respectively. 
Carolyn worked in a variety of Town departments including the Town Manager's office and the 
Town Accountant's office and finished her career as the long-time Assistant Town Clerk. 
Phyllis also concluded her career in the Town Clerk's office after having spent many years in 
the Assessor's office. Two veteran patrolmen retired from the Police Department in 2011. 
Frank Hancock started with the Police Department in 1982 and retired in January. Jon 
Shepard retired following more than 27 years on the force. Four members of the Public 
Buildings staff retired in 2011 including custodians William Falter, Mario Mazzeo and Joseph 
Vieira as well as maintenance technician Gordon Holden. John Lambert, a mechanic in the 
Department of Public Works, retired after 22 years of service as did Ray Parker who worked the 
same amount of years in the DPW Highway and Cemetery Divisions. Finally, we bade a fond 
farewell to the Town's highly skilled Public Health Nurse Judy Baggs, RN. Although Judy was 
only with the Town for five years, she had a tremendous impact on the Town's provision of 
community health services. 

It is always difficult to lose a valued employee and such was the case this past December when 
Police Officer Shawn Lee was laid to rest. Officer Lee served his community with distinction 
during his ten years on the Wilmington Police Department. His fight to survive inspired all of 
us and will serve as a reminder of his love of family and his dedication to duty. 

Change is inevitable. Those were the first three words that I wrote in the 1990 Annual Report, 
my initial report as Wilmington Town Manager. Although as I write this report a firm date has 
yet to be established, it is my intention to conclude my tenure as Town Manager in 2012. I will 
do so knowing that I have been afforded the singular privilege of serving in my own community, 
a community whose citizens I admire and respect. I feel fortunate to have worked along so 
many dedicated employees, responsible officials and energetic volunteers all committed to 
making our town the best that it can be. I am profoundly grateful for having had the 
opportunity to serve the Town of Wilmington and I look forward to continuing to work for the 
betterment of this extraordinary community. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 



Town Manager addresses community at 
9/11 10 th Anniversary Commemoration 

Photo by Matt Schooley, Wilmington Patch 



-9- 



ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 



Town Clerk 

The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer and Local Registrar of 
Vital Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the 
appropriate process, with notification and procedure, is adhered to in the making of legislative policy 
and of managing public access to this information. This office is often the first door of government 
accessed by individuals seeking information and the resolution of problems. It is with a sense of 
pride and accomplishment that we submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our 
citizens well. 



The following information and vital statistics were recorded during 2011: 



Births 207 

Marriage Intentions 97 

Marriages 95 

Deaths 300 

Deaths - Out of State 

Burial Permits 194 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 44 



Flammable Permits and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk's office. Notice is 
sent to the owner or occupant of land where the storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal 
by April 30th of each year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's regulations, 
may result in revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Fifty-one permits were issued during 
the year. 



Permits & Recordings: 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 

Federal Lien Recordings 

Federal Lien Releases 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 

Pole & Conduit Locations 

Dog Licenses 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 




The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. 

In this capacity she has met with the Board of Registrars on a D eer heads \, ac \ j nto the woods behind 

regular monthly meeting day, kept the minutes up to date and Town Hall 

supervised all elections and the annual town census by mail. 

The Town Clerk's office also maintains current voting lists and registers voters during regular office 
hours. She also meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify 
nomination papers for candidates. 



Town Meetings & Elections 2011 

Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Special Town Election 
Special Town Meeting 



April 23, 2011 
April 30, 2011 
December 6, 2011 
December 10, 2011 



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Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars 
were held as needed for the registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the 
Acts of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted in the Town Hall. 
The Board also met many times for certification of signatures on nomination papers and assisted at 
all elections and town meetings. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 51, 
Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32 and supervised the conduct of elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 
64 and Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 63, all in accordance with the Town Charter and By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. 

The calendar year 2011 had a total of 15,473 registered voters from our listed 22,443 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank the many households that returned their town census forms 
in 2011. 




1. Advice & Legal Documents . Advisory opinions were rendered to various town officials and 
boards relating to a wide variety of issues and subjects. Frequent and on-going attention 
was given to reviewing and/or drafting By-laws, easements, public document requests, 
compliance with the State Ethics Act and Open Meeting Law, various town rules and 
regulations, warrants for Town Meetings and other legal documents. 

2. Contracting & Procurement . During the period of our involvement with the town, we 
reviewed contracts, agreements, procurement documents and Massachusetts School Building 
Authority (MSBA) documentation. 

3. Projects . We assisted the town in connection with the Olin property contamination issue, 
new high school project, various real estate projects, betterment agreements, easement 
issues and controversies related to the impact of the operations of Krochmal Farm. 

4. Labor . Our labor specialists provided advice to the town on various personnel issues and 
collective bargaining disputes. 

5. Administrative Agency Proceedings . We assisted the town in various proceedings before 
various administrative agencies including the Appellate Tax Board, State Labor Relations 
Commission and State Joint Labor Management Committee. 



6. Miscellaneous . We provided advice to the Board of 
Selectmen, the Town Manager and various other 
public officials regarding a variety of matters. 
These issues included permitting and licensing 
issues, conflicts of interest, open meeting law and 
procedure, land use and zoning, procurement and 
competitive bid procedures and the enforcement of 
laws and regulations. 




Senator and Mrs. Brown greet folks at 
4 th of July festivities 



7. 



Litigation. Adversary Proceedings & Claims 



As of December 31, 2011, there were a total of 55 lawsuits, adversary proceedings and claims 
pending of which we have been informed: 

4 lawsuits involving the Board of Appeals: 

• Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 179451. 

• Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 179448. 

• Scott Garrant. James Diorio. Kevin Brander. Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek as they 
are members of the Wilmington Planning Board v. Charles E. Boyle. John R. Forest. Dan 
Wandell, Jr. as they are members of the Wilmington Board of Appeals and Mark Nelson, 
individually . Land Court Misc. No. 267499. 

• Tresca Brothers Sand & Gravel. Inc. and Lehigh Northeast Cement Co. v. Town of 
Wilmington Board of Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action Nos. 2011-CV-3909, 
2011-CV-3910, 2011-CV-3911. 

4 lawsuits involving the Planning Board: 

• Robert Troy v. Wilmington Planning Board . Land Court, Misc. No. 274810. 

• Mark D. Nelson v. The Town of Wilmington, the Board of Appeals, the Planning Board. 
Daniel W. Paret. as the former Building Inspector of the Town of Wilmington, John 
Spaulding as the current Building Inspector of the Town of Wilmington. Carole 
Hamilton. Director of Planning and Conservation, the Town Manager and the Town 
Water & Sewer Commission . Land Court 08 MISC 383336. 

• Feeney v. Wilmington Planning Board . Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 2008- 
03923. 

• Mark D. Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen. Planning Board. Lynn 
Duncan. Donald Onusseit and Anthony Pronski . Land Court, Misc. No. 284416. 

2 proceedings involving the Board of Selectmen: 

• New England Transrail. LLC Petition for Exemption . Surface Transportation Board, 
Docket No. 34797. 

• Frederick V. Shine (Defendant and Third Party Plaintiff) v. Town of Wilmington (Third 
Party Defendant) . Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 2007-00677. 

2 lawsuits involving the Police Department: 

• Carter v. Wilmington . Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, No. 
06BPD01306 (Police Department). 

• Robert F. Murphy. Ill v. Wilmington . Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination. 

1 proceeding involving the Public Buildings Department: 

• Holden v. Town of Wilmington , DIA No. 890508. 

1 proceeding involving the Water and Sewer Commission: 

• Wilmington v. Department of Environmental Protection , DEP Docket No. 2008-047. 



-12- 



2 proceedings involving the Department of Veterans' Services: 

• Town of Wilmington (Robert Palazzi) v. Department of Veterans' Services , No. VS-10- 
757. 

• Robert Palazzi v. Department of Veterans' Services, Town of Wilmington , Division of 
Administrative Law Appeals, Docket No. VS-11-413. 

2 proceedings involving the Conservation Commission: 

• App Tree. Inc. and Robert Riley, Jr. (27 Gunderson Road) . 

• Wilmington v. App Tree, Inc. , Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 11-2940. 

3 lawsuits involving the Board of Assessors: 

• Kaiser Realty Trust v. Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington , Appellate Tax 
Board Docket No. F310035. 

• Mark D. Nelson, Power of Attorney for George Nelson v. Board of Assessors of the Town 
of Wilmington . Appellate Tax Board Docket No. F310076. 

• Ann & John Krochmal c/o John Cave v. Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington . 
Appellate Tax Board Docket No. F305526. 

1 lawsuit involving the Department of Public Works: 

• Johnson v. Moakley et al. and Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 

07- 02271-B. 

1 lawsuit involving the Board of Public Health: 

• Krochmal Farm LLC v. Wilmington Board of Health . Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 

08- 04810-L2. 

5 lawsuits involving the Fire Department: 

• Town of Wilmington and Wilmington Fire Fighters. Local 1370 . AAA No. 11 390 02112 
10. 

• Christopher G. Pozzi v. Town of Wilmington . Civil Service Case No. G2-11-299. 

• Christopher G. Pozzi v. Town of Wilmington . AAA Case No. 1 1 390 01876 1 1 . 

• Christopher G. Pozzi v. Town of Wilmington . MUP-11-1281. 

• Walter Daley v. Town of Wilmington . Civil Service Case No. G2- 11-344. 

27 claims which are not yet lawsuits: 

• Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection v. Town of Wilmington 
(Maple Meadow Landfill). 

• Town of Wilmington v. Olin Chemical Corporation . 

• Witmore v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Liberty Mutual as subrogee for Tentmakers Moving LLC v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Kiesinger v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Galante v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Gillis v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Duffy v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Emrich v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 



-13- 



• David Boutiette v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• O'Neil v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Hermann v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Lemos v. Town of Wilmington (School) . 

• Pupa v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Martiniello v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Plummer v. Town of Wilmington (Conservation Commission) . 

• Gore v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Coates v. Town of Wilmington (Police Department) . 

• Jordan v. Wilmington (Schools) . 

• Reposa v. Wilmington (Schools) . 

• Mescall/Arbella Insurance v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Lucio v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Murphy v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Ventre v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Conrad v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Hawlev v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Fire Fighter Jason M. Kennedy v. the Town of Wilmington (Fire Department) . 

Each of the above efforts required the participation of numerous town officials and private citizen 
volunteers - all working together towards a better Wilmington. 

Thanks to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and all other town officials and citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance towards another successful year. 




Chairman Cimaglia accepts certificate of recognition on behalf of the 
Town of Wilmington from First Sergeant Paulette Newcomb, United States 
Marine Corps, Toys for Tots Program 



-14- 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 


2011 FISCAL YEAR 


Total Appropriation 




Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


443,835.00 


Air Pollution Districts 


6,717.00 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


6,527.00 


Mosquito Control Project 


46,962.00 


Tuition Assessment 


131,140.00 


KJViiiiay oi \_/urreni i ear 


7nn ooo ah 




Q7 7KO AA 


u i viol f i v*"i" 1 1 1 r\ smoii t o 

nnai v^ourx ejuugrntjin,s 


o no 


rvivi v ourciidrgt; 


1 490 00 

X \J , t £t \J . \}\J 


iviisceiidneous 


9 Ofi^ 00 


Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 




2011 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 


$14,812,647.00 


Motor Vehicle and 1 railer Excise 


2,700,123.00 


Penalties and interest on 1 axes 


330,000.00 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


650,000.00 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


2,255,834.00 


Other Charges for Services 


380,000.00 


Fees 


40,000.00 


Rentals 


60,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


10,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 


80,000.00 


Other Department Revenue 


20,000.00 


Licenses and Permits 


400,000.00 


Special Assessments 


0.00 


Fines and Forfeits 


120,000.00 


Investment Income 


80,000.00 


Voted from Available Funds 


759,495.00 


Miscellaneous Recurring 


303,000.00 



$78,203,225.00 



1.385.418.47 
$79,588,643.47 



$23.001.099.00 



Real Estate 

Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



$2,617,278,752.00 @ 11.88 p/t 
$ 144,596,020.00 @ 28. 10 p/t 
$ 680,325,328.00 @ 28. 10 p/t 
$ 82,348,150.00 @ 28.10 p/t 



31,093,271.57 
4,063,148.16 
19,117,141.72 
2.313.983.02 
$56,587,544.47 



-15- 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR 



Commitments 



2012 Preliminary Real Estate 


$27,711,327 


28 


2011 Real Estate 


54,275,679 


46 


2012 Preliminary Personal Property 


1,184,699 


34 


2011 Personal Property 


2,313,983 


31 


2011 Excise 


3,110,749 


28 


2010 Excise 


22,317 


16 


Ambulance 


1,788,302 


96 


Apportioned Sewer Betterments 


46,828 


78 


Interest 


17,844 


70 


Sewer Liens 


78,498 


16 


Water Liens 


227,983 


52 


Electric Liens 


25,980 


43 


Apportioned Title 5 Betterments 


33,302 


75 


Interest 


11.561 


17 


Total 


$90,849,058 


30 



Collections 

Real Estate $54,670,845.30 

Personal Property 2,565,837.13 

Excise 3,056,900.64 

Sewer Betterments 62,339.80 

Title 5 Betterments 44,863.92 

Water Liens 226,426.24 

Sewer Liens 75,263.62 

Electric Liens 20,663.73 

Excise Interest & Charges 93,811.96 

Ambulance 509,677.00 

Lien Certificates 24,275.00 

Betterment Certificates 76.00 

Miscellaneous 78.56 

Water Collections 4,038,577.64 

Sewer Collections 2,457,435.56 

Real Estate Interest & Charges 217,077.61 

Personal Property Interest & Charges 42,686.46 

Tax Titles 389,567.90 

Tax Title Interest 69.118.12 

Total $68,565,522.19 



-16- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 
and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of Wilmington for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 2011 are hereby submitted. This report was prepared by the Office of the Town 
Accountant. Responsibility for accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the 
presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate in all material respects and 
are reported in a manner designed to present fairly the financial position and results of operations of 
the various funds and account groups of the government. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Michael Morris 
Town Accountant 



-17- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 



Table of Contents 

PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet-All Fund Types and Account Groups 19 

Notes to Financial Statements 20 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances-All Governmental Fund 

Types and Expendable Trust Funds 24 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet-Special Revenue Accounts 25 
Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balance-Special Revenue Accounts 26 
Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 

Authorization by Function and Activity-General Fund 27 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures- Water Fund 31 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures-Capital Projects Fund 32 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 33 

Schedule of Trust and Agency Funds 34 



-18- 



Assets 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 



General 



Special 
Revenue 



Capital 
Projects 



Trust & 
Agency 



Long-Term 
Debt 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 
Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 1,695,676.20 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions (2,083,452.46) 



15,267,797.35 8,878,106.26 1,259,391.71 3,305,011.70 



Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



918,570.97 
645,091.88 
620,608.03 
117,620.54 
677,845.72 
125,714.36 



341,286.48 
298,997.62 



26,359.00 



28,710,307.02 

1,695,676.20 
(2,083,452.46) 
918,570.97 
645,091.88 
620,608.03 
117,620.54 
677,845.72 
467,000.84 
325,356.62 

6,138,435.00 6,138,435.00 



Total Assets 



17,985,472.59 9,518,390.36 1,285,750.71 3,305,011.70 6,138,435.00 38,233,060.36 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 
Warrants Payable 
Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 
Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings Payable 
Incurred Costs 



1,220,539.95 135,264.92 



1,695,676.20 
3,105,451.50 

110,168.17 



3,781.60 195,971.91 



640,284.10 26,359.00 



6,138,435.00 



1,555,558.38 

1,695,676.20 
3,772,094.60 
6,138,435.00 
110,168.17 



Total Liabilities 



6,131,835.82 775,549.02 30,140.60 195,971.91 6,138,435.00 13,271,932.35 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Special Purpose MTBE 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Res. For Performance Bonds 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



1,993,825.96 1,578,378.54 1,195,993.59 

5,283,377.16 2,742,446.60 
951,175.64 
929,910.00 

366,593.19 

9,859,810.81 59,616.52 



4,768,198.09 
8,025,823.76 
951,175.64 
929,910.00 
366,593.19 
9,919,427.33 



Total Fund Balance 



11,853,636.77 8,742,841.34 1,255,610.11 3,109,039.79 



0.00 24,961,128.01 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 



17,985,472.59 9,518,390.36 1,285,750.71 3,305,011.70 6,138,435.00 38,233,060.36 



-19- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 2011 



1. Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. It is governed by an elected Board of Selectmen and an open Town Meeting. 
The Board of Selectmen appoint a Town Manager who in accordance with Chapter 592 of 
1950, serves as chief fiscal and administrative officer of the town. Other town officials are 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. Generally Accepted 
Accounting Principles (GAAP) requires that the accompanying general purpose financial 
statements present the Town of Wilmington (the primary government) and its component 
units. Component units are included in the Town's reporting entity if their operational and 
financial relationships with the Town are significant. Pursuant to this criteria, the following 
entities have been excluded from the accompanying general purpose financial statements: 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly as well as subsidizing low 
income housing units. 

Middlesex Regional Retirement System - provides county government and various 
services for member communities. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District - provides 
education services for member communities. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage disposal services and 
supplements the water supply. 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of Wilmington conform to 
generally accepted accounting principles for local governmental units except as indicated in 
Note 3. The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds and one account group in 
order to comply with the limitations and restrictions placed on both the resources 
made available to the town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped 
in the financial statements in this report into five generic fund types as follows: 

Governmental Funds 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of the town. It is used 
to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in 
another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to account for the proceeds of 
specific revenue resources (other than expendable trust or major capital projects) 
that are legally restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to account for financial 
resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities or 
equipment. 



-20- 



Fiduciary Funds 



Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held 
by the town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for individuals, private 
organizations, other governments and/or other funds. These include expendable 
trust, non-expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic measurements of revenues 
earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order to demonstrate maintenance of 
capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially the same manner as 
governmental funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to be financed from 
governmental funds are accumulated in the general long-term debt group of 
accounts. This account group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the 
measurement of financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared principally on the 
modified accrual basis of accounting. This method recognizes revenues when they 
become measurable and available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become available. 
Available means then due or past due and receivable within the current period or 
expected to be collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the 
current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is received. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental revenues, the 
legal and contractual requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as 
guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, 
moneys must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any amounts will 
be paid to the town. Therefore, revenues are recognized based upon the expenditures 
recorded. In the other, moneys are virtually unrestricted as to purpose of 
expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as revenues at the time of 
receipt or earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash disbursement basis. 
In addition, as required by Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made 
during the fifteen days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and expenses as of June 
30th. 

Purchase orders and other contractual obligations outstanding at June 30th related 
to annual operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, as a 
reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is measurable but not 
available has been classified as deferred revenue on June 30th. 



-21- 



Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase orders, contracts 
and other commitments for the expenditure of funds are recorded in order to reserve 
that portion of the applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. 
Open encumbrances at year-end are reported as reservations of fund balances. 
Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or liabilities. 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are recorded as 
expenditures when purchased (purchase method). 

General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as expenditures in 
applicable governmental funds. The town does not capitalize the cost of 
general fixed assets in a general fixed asset account group, which is 
consistent with the practice of municipalities in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

C. Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned Memorandum Only to 
indicate that they are presented only to facilitate financial analysis. Data in these 
columns do not present financial position, results of operations or changes in 
financial position in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. Such 
data is not comparable to a consolidation since interfund eliminations have not been 
made. 

D. Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Regional Retirement System, a single 
employer plan, established under Chapter 32 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Substantially all full-time and some part-time 
employees of the town except teachers and certain administrative personnel 
employed by the School Department participate in the system. Benefits paid under 
the plan, referred to as retirement allowance, include both an annuity portion, 
funded principally from amounts contributed by the participants, and a pension 
portion funded by the town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their compensation annually, 
determined by their date of employment. The Town's employer contribution as 
determined by the County's actuarial valuation is determined by normal cost plus the 
amortization of the original unfunded actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School Department participate 
in a contributory retirement plan administered by the Massachusetts Teachers 
Retirement Board. Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and therefore, the town does not contribute to the 
plan. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on the basis of 
accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of 
Revenue. These practices differed in many significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform municipal 
accounting system entitled Uniform Municipal Accounting System. The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. The town has adopted 
a modified Uniform Municipal Accounting System for its financial statements. 



-22- 



The significant departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principals included in the 
town of Wilmington's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with Chapter 32 of the Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (see note ID). 



B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at the time purchases 
is made rather than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as expenditures rather 
than assets at time of purchase. 

4. Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All financial orders are initiated 
or recommended at Town meetings. Expenditures are limited to the line items as voted at 
the Town meetings. Department heads may not transfer, without approval, appropriation 
balances from one expenditure account to another within their department or budget. These 
along with transfers or unencumbered appropriation balances between departments or 
agencies must be approved at Town Meetings. 



5. Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 5% of its equalized 
valuation. Debt issued in accordance with this state law is designated as being inside the 
debt limit. In addition, however, a town may authorize debt in excess of that limit for 
specific purposes. Such debt when issued is designated as being outside the debt limit. The 
following summarized the annual debt service requirements as of June 30, 2011. 



General Obligation Bonds 



Principal Interest Total 



Outstanding June 30, 2010 $ 3,512,080 $ 173,613 $ 3,685,693 

Retirements $ 3,512,080 $ 173,613 $ 3,685,693 

Additions $ 4.540.000 $ 1.413,635 $ 5,953,635 

Outstanding June 30, 2011 $ 4,540,000 $ 1,413,635 $ 5,953,635 




Wilmington Rotary Club President James Cobb presents check to Library Director 
Christina Stewart with Rotary member ]ohn Doherty and Board of Selectmen 
Chairman Louis Cimaglia. The donation is to benefit technology infrastructure 
improvements at the library. 



-23- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 





FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 






REVENUES: 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 
Intergovernmental 


General 

55,780,899.84 
389,297.51 
71,875.05 
2,968,034.91 
469,715.03 
526,183.07 
14,804,336.18 


Special 
Revenue 

227,058.03 
47,651.16 

4,080,747.00 


Capital Projects 


Fiduciary 
Fund Types 
Expendable 
Trust 

45,612.10 
863.42 


Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 

55,780,899.84 
616,355.54 
119,526.21 
2,968,034.91 
469,715.03 
571,795.17 

18,885,946.60 


Charges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Appropriation Reimbursements 
Gifts 

Bond Premiums 
Other 


2,751,537.00 
130,326.80 
35,385.80 
135,662.55 
0.00 
0.00 
291,655.67 
1,463,786.10 


7,457,548.42 

9,091.32 
247,804.98 
57,290.17 


15,684.00 
104,798.00 


435,560.20 

39,227.74 
602,756.13 
3,189,899.31 

938,270.30 


10,644,645.62 
130,326.80 
35,385.80 
183,981.61 
618,440.13 
3,437,704.29 
291,655.67 
2,564,144.57 


Total Revenues 


79,818,695.51 


12,127,191.08 


120,482.00 


5,252,189.20 


97,318,557.79 


EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Works 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Health Incurred Costs 
Statutory Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Bond Anticipation Notes 
Warrant Articles 


1,729,132.21 
7,826,478.53 
1,176,816.21 
5,658,832.09 
677,585.35 
4,162,200.43 
33,538,404.36 
117,902.70 
351,790.13 
3,773,467.75 
1,272,133.84 
0.00 

6,619,122.00 
1,115,101.77 
0.00 
23,842.00 


32,216.46 
149,039.89 
139,984.73 
3,021,703.98 
23,892.03 
6,355.67 
4,934,698.79 
832,786.83 

17,805.78 

1,405,984.56 
100,000.00 


931,277.21 
354,668.68 

341,505.23 
1,250,000.00 


3,346,468.22 
331,515.84 
18,100.58 
35,600.00 

78,251.92 
446,368.27 

9,426,607.96 


5,107,816.89 
9,238,311.47 
1,334,901.52 
9,070,804.75 
701,477.38 
4,246,808.02 
39,260,976.65 
950,689.53 
351,790.13 
3,773,467.75 
1,289,939.62 
9,426,607.96 
6,619,122.00 
2,521,086.33 
1,350,000.00 
23,842.00 


Total Expenditures 


68,042,809.37 


10,664,468.72 


2,877,451.12 


13,682,912.79 


95,267,642.00 


Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 


11,775,886.14 


1,462,722.36 


(2,756,969.12) 


(8,430,723.59) 


2,050,915.79 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
State and County Charges 


929,831.04 
(9,517,373.18) 


1,600,000.00 
87,661.18 
(929,831.04) 


2,940,000.00 
579,712.00 


8,850,000.00 


4,540,000.00 
10,447,204.22 
(10,447,204.22) 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


(8,587,542.14) 


757,830.14 


3,519,712.00 


8,850,000.00 


4,540,000.00 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 


3,188,344.00 


2,220,552.50 


762,742.88 


419,276.41 


6,590,915.79 


Fund Balance July 1, 2010 


9,017,041.79 


6,522,288.84 


492,867.23 


2,689,763.38 


18,721,961.24 


Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 


(351,749.02) 








(351,749.02) 


Fund Balance June 30, 2011 


11,853,636.77 


8,742,841.34 


1,255,610.11 


3,109.039.79 


24,961,128.01 



-24- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 



Assets 



Grants 



Gifts 



Reserved for 
Appropriation 



Revolving 



Water 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 

Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 
Less: Prov for Abates & 
Exemptions 

Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



917,240.79 327,997.91 457,519.78 2,405,811.21 4,769,536.57 8,878,106.26 



298,997.62 



341,286.48 



341,286.48 
298,997.62 



Total Assets 



1,216,238.41 327,997.91 



457,519.78 2,405,811.21 5,110,823.05 



,518,390.36 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings Payable 
Incurred Costs 



19,777.68 



298,997.62 



55,434.84 60,052.40 135,264.92 



341,286.48 640,284.10 



Total Liabilities 



318,775.30 



0.00 



0.00 



55,434.84 401,338.88 



775,549.02 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Special Purpose MTBE 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Res. For Performance Bonds 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



897,463.11 327,997.91 



1,578,378.54 1,578,378.54 

437,519.78 2,350,376.37 1,270,019.99 5,283,377.16 

951,175.64 951,175.64 

20,000.00 909,910.00 929,910.00 



Total Fund Balance 



897,463.11 327,997.91 



457,519.78 2.350,376.37 4,709,484.17 8,742,841.34 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 1,216,238.41 327,997.91 



457,519.78 2,405,811.21 5,110,823.05 9,518,390.36 



-25- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 





Grants 


Gifts 


Reserved for 
Appropriation 


Revolving 
Funds 


Water 


Total 


REVENUES: 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Appropriation Reimbursements 
Gifts 

Bond Proceeds 
Other 


3,861,780.82 
428.84 
4,115.00 


317.96 
123,307.97 


8,009.09 
31,649.00 


47,651.16 

218,966.18 
3,381,092.31 

124,497.01 
14,699.80 


227,058.03 

4,076,456.11 
335.43 

6,826.37 


0.00 
227,058.03 
47,651.16 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

4,080,747.00 
7,457,548.42 
0.00 
0.00 
9,091.32 
0.00 
247,804.98 
0.00 
57,290.17 


Total Revenues 


3,866,324.66 


123,625.93 


39,658.09 


3,786,906.46 


4,310,675.94 


12,127,191.08 


EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 

l>,.l 1, . ;' i , 

ruDlic balety 

Human Services 

Public Works 

Community Development 

Building Maintenance 

Education 

Recreation 

Veterans' Services 

Debt and Interest 

Unclassified 

Incurred Costs 

Statutory Charges 

Capital Outlay 

BANs 

Warrant Articles 


8,998.06 

1 O O COA C A 

loo,bzU.D4 

89,989.63 
368,384.92 
23,892.03 

z,4zo,ooy.o / 
17,805.78 


3,143.75 
15,419.35 
11,197.61 

5,182.76 

6,355.67 


300.00 


20,074.65 

38,797.49 
7,268.01 

o cao i on oo 
Z,OU», lj9. ZZ 

832,786.83 


2,640,568.29 

1,405,984.56 
100,000.00 


32,216.46 
149,039.89 
139,984.73 
3,021,703.98 
23,892.03 
6,355.67 
4,934,b98.79 
832,786.83 
0.00 
0.00 
17,805.78 
0.00 
U.UU 
1,405,984.56 
100,000.00 
0.00 


Total Expenditures 


3,069,250.53 


A 1 OQQ 1 A 

4i,zyy. 14 


Of\f\ f\f\ 

oUU.UU 


o ac\i n££ on 
o,4U /,Ubb.ZU 


A 1 A C £ CO oc 

4, 14b,DOZ.oo 


in CtCA ACQ 10 

!U,bb4,4b8. / Z 


Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 


797,074.13 


82,326.79 


39,358.09 


379,840.26 


164,123.09 


1,462,722.36 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 

Operating Transfers Out (170,336.04) 
State and County Charges 




(25,000.00) 




1,600,000.00 
87,661.18 
(734,495.00) 


1,600,000.00 
87,661.18 
(929,831.04) 


Total Other Financing Sources 
(Uses) 


(170,336.04) 


0.00 


(25,000.00) 


0.00 


953,166.18 


757,830.14 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 


626,738.09 


82,326.79 


14,358.09 


379,840.26 


1,117,289.27 


2,220,552.50 


Fund Balance July 1, 2010 


270,725.02 


245,671.12 


443,161.69 


1,970,536.11 


3,592,194.90 


6,522,288.84 


Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 














Fund Balance June 30, 2011 


897,463.11 


327,997.91 


457,519.78 


2,350,376.37 


4,709,484.17 


8,742,841.34 



-26- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2011 







C. FWD TO 


TRANSFER & 












FY 11 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 12 


CLOSE 


FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




FROM FY 10 


FISCAL 2011 


FISCAL 2011 


FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2011 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 














Selectmen 


Stipend 


0.00 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


0.00 


14,700.00 


13,890.47 


0.00 


809.53 


Selectmen 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


00 


00 


00 


0.00 




0.00 


19,200.00 


18,390.47 


0.00 


809.53 


Elections 


Salaries 


0.00 


27,190.00 


20,900.82 


0.00 


6,289.18 


Elections 


Constable 


0.00 


175.00 


175.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elections 


Expenses 


0.00 


9,085.00 


7,449.75 


0.00 


1.635.25 




00 


qc A^rt oo 


^0,0^0.0 / 


00 


7 924 43 


Registrars 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,875.00 


1,875.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


0.00 


6,350.00 


6,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


8,225.00 


8,225.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Finance Committee 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,330.00 


754.11 


0.00 


575.89 


Finance Committee 


Expenses 


0.00 


8.500.00 


7.948.74 


0.00 


551.26 




0.00 


9,830.00 


8,702.85 


0.00 


1,127.15 


Town Manager 


Sal-Town Manager 


0.00 


140,538.58 


140,538.58 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


257,163.50 


253,568.34 


0.00 


3,595.16 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


00 


79 ^oo on 


4fi ^09 4^ 


1 ^OO OO 


94 9Q7 ^ 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


800.00 


800.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


470,802.08 


441,409.37 


1,500.00 


27,892.71 


Town Accountant 


Sal-Town Accountant 


0.00 


101,436.60 


101,436.60 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Salaries-Other 


00 


99ft 1 9fi A(\ 


998 1 9fi dfi 


00 


00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 


7.000.00 


2,560.00 


2,339.31 


7.000.00 


220.69 




7,000.00 


332,123.06 


331,902.37 


7,000.00 


220.69 


Treasurer/Collector 


Sal-Treasurer/Collector 


0.00 


79,167.94 


79,167.94 


0.00 


0.00 


Treasurer/Collector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


124,443.00 


121,736.43 


0.00 


2,706.57 


Treasurer/Collector 


Expenses 


00 


90 9ft7 OO 


1 ft 01 ^ ^ 


00 


2 371 45 


Treasurer/Collector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


849.00 


0.00 


151.00 


Treasurer/Collector 


Amt. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


4.105.40 


10.000.00 


12.939.00 


1,166.40 


0.00 






4,105.40 


234,997.94 


232,707.92 


1,166.40 


5,229.02 


Town Clerk 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


70,564.94 


70,564.94 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


129,731.59 


129,731.59 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,900.00 


2.573.06 


0.00 


326.94 




0.00 


203,196.53 


202,869.59 


0.00 


326.94 


Assessors 


Sal-Principal Assessor 


0.00 


98,719.59 


98,719.59 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


89,270.63 


89,270.63 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Expenses 


36,284.97 


94,450.00 


53,277.76 


47,493.66 


29,963.55 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




36,284.97 


282,440.22 


241,267.98 


47,493.66 


29,963.55 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


0.00 


212,500.00 


212,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Counsel 


Expenses 


0.00 


7.500.00 


2,631.09 


0.00 


4,868.91 




0.00 


220,000.00 


215,131.09 


0.00 


4,868.91 


Permanent Bid Committee 


Salaries 


0.00 


450.00 


0.00 


0.00 


450.00 


Permanent Bid Committee 


Expenses 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


450.00 


0.00 


0.00 


450.00 


General Government Subtotal 




47,390.37 


1,817,714.83 


1,729,132.21 


57,160.06 


78,812.93 


PUBLIC SAFETY: 














Police 


Sal-Chief 


0.00 


109,551.09 


109,551.09 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Deputy Chief 


0.00 


96,438.46 


96,438.46 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Lieutenants 


0.00 


306,295.66 


306,295.66 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Sergeants 


0.00 


389,262.44 


389,262.44 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,902,765.03 


1,866,118.79 


36,646.24 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Clerical 


0.00 


82,281.40 


82,281.40 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Fill In Costs 


0.00 


455,000.00 


446,234.49 


8,765.51 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Paid Holidays 


0.00 


92,682.00 


77,946.97 


0.00 


14,735.03 


Police 


Sal-Specialist 


0.00 


12,350.00 


11,925.00 


0.00 


425.00 


Police 


Sal. -Incentive 


0.00 


292,225.50 


292,225.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Night Diff 


0.00 


43,992.00 


40,662.00 


0.00 


3,330.00 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


32,418.00 


29,246.38 


0.00 


3,171.62 


Police 


Expenses 


4,543.96 


235,625.00 


210,220.60 


7,323.46 


22,624.90 


Police 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




4,543.96 


4,056,886.58 


3,964,408.78 


52,735.21 


44,286.55 



-27- 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 

Fire 



Public Safety Central Disp. 
Public Safety Central Disp. 
Public Safety Central Disp. 
Public Safety Central Disp. 
Public Safety Central Disp. 



Animal Control 
Animal Control 

Public Safety Subtotal 

PUBLIC WORKS: 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 



Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 

Highway Division 



Snow & Ice Control 
Snow & Ice Control 



Highway Division 



Tree Division 
Tree Division 



Parks & Grounds Division 
Parks & Grounds Division 



Cemetery Division 
Cemetery Division 

Sewer 
Sewer 

Sewer Subtotal 
Total Public Works 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2011 





C. FWD TO 


TRANSFER & 










FY 11 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 12 


CLOSE 




FROM FY 10 


FISCAL 2011 


FISCAL 2011 


FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2011 


Sal. -Chief 


0.00 


112,916.24 


112,916.24 


0.00 


0.00 


C 1 T""\ a. - p 

Sal -Deputy Chief 


0.00 


83,819.67 


83,819.67 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal. -Lieutenant 


0.00 


436,069.87 


436,069.87 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal. -Privates 


0.00 


1,808,102.91 


1,808,102.91 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal.-Clerk 


0.00 


50,571.81 


50,571.81 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal.-Part Time 


0.00 


18,200.00 


15,386.00 


0.00 


2,814.00 


Sal -Overtime Costs 


0.00 


503,334.15 


503,334.15 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal. -Paid Holidays 


0.00 


127,416.18 


127,416.18 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal.-Incentive/EMT 


0.00 


9,450.00 


9,450.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Sal. -Fire Alarm 


u.uu 


n no 
U.UU 


ri fin 
U.UU 


U.UU 


U.UU 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


27,833.00 


26,805.14 


0.00 


1,027.86 


Expenses 


669.64 


121,325.00 


117,249.40 


30.99 


4,714.25 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


14.750.00 


14.750.00 


0.00 


0.00 


669.64 


3,313,788.83 


3,305,871.37 


30.99 


8,556.11 


Salaries Full Time 


0.00 


439,686.25 


439,686.25 


0.00 


0.00 


Salaries Overtime 


0.00 


48,000.00 


48,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adjustments 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Expenses 


12,424.67 


18,750.00 


27,663.53 


561.75 


2,949.39 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


12,424.67 


506,436.25 


515,349.78 


561.75 


2,949.39 


Salaries 


0.00 


38,523.60 


38,523.60 


0.00 


0.00 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,325.00 


2,325.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


40,848.60 


40.848.60 


0.00 


0.00 




17,638.27 


7,917,960.26 


7,826,478.53 


53.327.95 


55,792.05 



Salaries 


0.00 


219,195.20 


219,195.20 


0.00 


0.00 


Salaries Part Time 


0.00 


11,952.00 


11,337.20 


0.00 


614.80 


Expenses 


0.00 


14.500.00 


13.110.71 


0.00 


1.389.29 


0.00 


245,647.20 


243,643.11 


0.00 


2,004.09 


Sal-DPW Superintendent 


0.00 


103,682.25 


103,682.25 


0.00 


0.00 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


1,228,725.72 


1,228,725.72 


0.00 


0.00 


Stream Maint. Sal. 


0.00 


11,520.00 


9,260.29 


0.00 


2,259.71 


Stream Maint. Exp. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


816.08 


0.00 


183.92 


Expenses 


0.00 


329,990.00 


329,463.51 


0.00 


526.49 


Road Machinery Exp. 


0.00 


80,000.00 


79,448.29 


0.00 


551.71 


Fuel & Other 


0.00 


321,660.00 


315,875.29 


0.00 


5,784.71 


Drainage Projects 


0.00 


55,000.00 


53,466.89 


0.00 


1,533.11 


Public Street Lights 


0.00 


235,000.00 


232,606.18 


0.00 


2,393.82 


Furnish & Equipment 


0.00 


49.500.00 


47.555.00 


0.00 


1.945.00 


0.00 


2,416,077.97 


2,400,899.50 


0.00 


15,178.47 


Salaries 


0.00 


213,345.88 


213,345.88 


0.00 


0.00 


Expenses 


0.00 


504.230.00 


504.185.67 


0.00 


44.33 


0.00 


717,575.88 


717,531.55 


0.00 


44.33 


Rubbish Collection 


161.577.36 


1.347.603.00 


1.467.665.55 


41.514.81 


(0.00) 




161,577.36 


1,347,603.00 


1,467,665.55 


41,514.81 


(0.00) 


Salaries 


0.00 


179,518.00 


164,373.68 


0.00 


15,144.32 


Expenses 


0.00 


11.500.00 


10,475.82 


0.00 


1.024.18 


0.00 


191,018.00 


174,849.50 


0.00 


16,168.50 


Salaries 


0.00 


285,658.86 


281,260.94 


0.00 


4,397.92 


Expenses 


0.00 


126.870.00 


126.870.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


412,528.86 


408,130.94 


0.00 


4,397.92 


Salaries 


0.00 


123,957.73 


123,957.73 


0.00 


0.00 


Expenses 


0.00 


17.750.00 


16,625.50 


0.00 


1.124.50 


0.00 


141,707.73 


140,583.23 


0.00 


1,124.50 


Salaries 


0.00 


40,638.00 


34,348.81 


0.00 


6,289.19 


Expenses 


47.637.81 


58,720.00 


71.179.90 


27,384.03 


7.793.88 


47.637.81 


99.358.00 


105.528.71 


27.384.03 


14.083.07 




209,215.17 


5,571,516.64 


5,658,832.09 


68,898.84 


53,000.88 



-28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2011 







C. FWDTO 


TRANSFER & 












FY 11 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 12 


CLOSE 


FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




FROM FY 11) 


FISCAL 2011 


FISCAL 2011 


FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2011 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 












Board of Health 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


69,501.66 


69,501.66 


0.00 


0.00 


DOdlU OI ncdllll 


Salaries- Other 


625.00 


114,686.00 


83,922.38 


0.00 


30,763.62 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


0.00 


9,975.00 


6,446.53 


0.00 


3,528.47 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


35,000.00 


35,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Board of Health 


Furnish. & Equip. 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 






99Q 1 CO fifi 


1 QA ft70 ^7 


00 


QA 909 no 


Sealer/Weights & Measures 


Inspectional Services 


0.00 


5.000.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Planning/ Conservation 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


80,027.78 


80,027.78 


0.00 


0.00 


Planning/ Conservation 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


217,043.00 


215,318.82 


0.00 


1,724.18 


Planning/ Conservation 


Expenses 


0.00 


10,175.00 


5,571.87 


0.00 


4,603.13 


Planning/Conservation 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


500.00 


139.98 


0.00 


360.02 


0.00 


307,745.78 


301,058.45 


0.00 


6,687.33 


Building Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


71,896.11 


71,896.11 


0.00 


0.00 


Building Inspector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


105,846.23 


102,002.79 


0.00 


3,843.44 


Building Inspector 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,250.00 


2,757.43 


0.00 


1.492.57 


Building Inspector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


o.oo 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


181.992.34 


176.656.33 


0.00 


5.336.01 


Community Development Subtotal 


625.00 


723,900.78 


677,585.35 


0.00 


46,315.43 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 














Public Buildings 


Sal-Superintendent 


0.00 


86,740.72 


86,740.72 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


2,298,614.63 


2.245,780.82 


52,833.81 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Expenses-Town Buildings 


22,658.43 


190,000.00 


197,666.57 


14,991.86 


(0.00) 


Public Buildings 


Electric-Town Buildings. 


0.00 


200,000.00 


173,163.11 


0.00 


26,836.89 


Public Buildings 


Utilities-Town Buildings. 


0.00 


110,000.00 


98,546.04 


0.00 


11,453.96 


Public Buildings 


Expenses School Buildings 


0.00 


220,000.00 


214,453.17 


169.56 


5,377.27 


Public Buildings 


Training & Conference 


0.00 


400.00 


388.65 


0.00 


11.35 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


0.00 


1,083,000.00 


1,052,679.69 


0.00 


30,320.31 


Public Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


0.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


40,000.00 


15,267.25 


24,732.75 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


0.00 


75,000.00 


71.514.41 


0.00 


3.485.59 


22.658.43 


4.309.755.35 


4.162.200.43 


92.727.98 


77.485.37 


Public Buildings Subtotal 




22,658.43 


4,309,755.35 


4,162,200.43 


92,727.98 


77,485.37 


HUMAN SERVICES: 














Veterans' Services 


Salary 


0.00 


54,876.30 


54,876.30 


0.00 


0.00 


Veterans' Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,500.00 


1,308.87 


0.00 


191.13 


Veterans' Services 


Assistance 


1.000.00 


306.000.00 


295.604.96 


11.395.04 


(0.00) 






1,000.00 


362,376.30 


351,790.13 


11,395.04 


191.13 


Library 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


82,680.63 


82,680.63 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


708.761.99 


708,761.99 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Expenses 


0.00 


145,639.00 


145,630.20 


0.00 


8.80 


Library 


M.V.L.C. 


0.00 


33,239.00 


33,239.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


8.704.00 


8.704.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


979,024.62 


979,015.82 


0.00 


8.80 


Recreation 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


67,185.06 


67,185.06 


0.00 


0.00 


Recreation 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


46,024.74 


46,024.74 


0.00 


0.00 


Recreation 


Expenses 


265.00 


4.500.00 


4.692.90 


0.00 


72.10 




265.00 


117,709.80 


117,902.70 


0.00 


72.10 


Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


£IK QIC 1 Q 
00,000. lo 


OD.OOO. 1 o 


n on 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 




70 HAG Qfl 


0.00 


H Ail A HC\ 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


39.200.00 


34.211.36 


0.00 


4.988.64 


0.00 


184,767.13 


172,293.79 


0.00 


12,473.34 


Historical Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


21,018.00 


18,796.23 


0.00 


2,221.77 


Historical Comm. 


Expenses 


1.700.00 


6.750.00 


6.710.37 


1.648.50 


91.13 






1.700.00 


27.768.00 


25.506.60 


1.648.50 


2.312.90 


Human Services Subtotal 




2,965.00 


1,671,645.85 


1,646,509.04 


13,043.54 


15,058.27 


EDUCATION: 














School Dept. 


Salaries 


590,906.44 


23,630,695.00 


23,275,184.90 


879,586.04 


66,830.50 


School Dept. 


Expenses 


0.00 


7.069.305.00 


7.136.135.50 


0.00 


(66,830.50) 


590,906.44 


30,700,000.00 


30,411,320.40 


879,586.04 


0.00 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


3.127.587.00 


3.127.083.96 


0.00 


503.04 






0.00 


3.127.587.00 


3.127.083.96 


00 


503.04 


Education Subtotal 




590,906.44 


33,827,587.00 


33,538,404.36 


879,586.04 


503.04 



-29- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2011 



C. FWDTO 
FY 11 

FUNCTION/ACTIVITY FROM FY 10 

DEBT SERVICE. 

Debt & Interest Schools 0.00 

Debt & Interest Gen. Government 0.00 

Debt & Interest Sewer 0.00 

Debt & Interest Auth. Fees & Misc. 45.000.00 

45.000.00 

Debt & Interest Subtotal 45,000.00 

Insurance & Bonds 0.00 
Employee Health & Life Insurance 0.00 
Veterans' Retirement 0.00 
Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 0.00 
Medicare Employers' Contr. 0.00 
Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 233,419.57 
Local Trans/Training Conf. 0.00 
Out of State Travel 0.00 
Computer Hdwe/Sftwe Maint. & Expenses 66,928.41 
Annual Audit 0.00 
Ambulance Billing 0.00 
Town Report 0.00 
Professional & Technical Services 173,182.61 

Reserve Fund <X00 

Unclassified Subtotal 473,530.59 

Current Year Overlay 0.00 
Retirement Contributions 0.00 
Offset Items 0.00 
Special Education 0.00 
Mass Bay Trans Auth. 0.00 
MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 0.00 
RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 0.00 
Metro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 0.00 
Mosquito Control Program 0.00 
M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 0.00 
Charter Schools 0.00 
School Choice 0.00 

Essex County Tech Institute 0.00 

Statutory Charges Subtotal 0.00 

Unclassified Memorial/Veterans Day 0.00 

Unclassified Lease of Quarters 0.00 

Unclassified Design-Main Street Sewer 6,780.00 

Unclassified Storm Water Mgmt Plan 13,649.90 

Unclassified Senior Tax Rebate Program 6,444.00 

Unclassified Facility Needs Study 58.717.23 
Warrant Articles Subtotal 85,591.13 

Police Cruisers 0.00 

Fire Ambulance 191,009.00 

Fire EMS Computer System 6,871.42 

Fire Communications Sys Conv 0.00 

Fire Pickup Trucks 0.00 

Public Works Pick-up/One Ton Truck 0.00 

Public Works Construct/Maint Vehicles 0.00 

Public Works Cemetery Expansion 30,051.41 

Public Buildings Roof Repairs 0.00 

Public Buildings Misc. Facility Improvement 0.00 

Public Buildings Trucks 0.00 

Public Buildings Library Ceiling Lighting 29,930.04 

School Fire Alarm Wildwood Sch. 58, 1 12.55 

School Fire Alarm Shawsheen Sch. 48,112.55 

School Floor Replace Woburn St. 235.400.00 
Capital Outlay Subtotal 699,48*122 
GRAND TOTAL 2,195,007.37 



TRANSFER & 



APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


C.FWD TO 12 


CLOSE 


FISCAL 2011 


FISCAL 2011 


FROM FY 11 


FISCAL 2011 


2,665,950.00 


2,665,950.00 


0.00 


0.00 


894,913.00 


894,913.00 


0.00 


0.00 


171,030.00 


171,030.00 


0.00 


0.00 


15.000.00 


41,574.75 


0.00 


18.425.25 


3.746.893.00 


3.773,467.75 


o.oo 


18.425.25 


3,746,893.00 


3,773,467.75 


0.00 


18,425.25 


612,500.00 


485,796.01 


0.00 


126,703.99 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,008.00 


2,168.08 


0.00 


839.92 


30,000.00 


29,339.83 


0.00 


660.17 


530,654.00 


518,469.62 


0.00 


12,184.38 


56,757.29 


14,753.29 


275,423.57 


0.00 


5,000.00 


2,713.90 


0.00 


2,286.10 


1,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,500.00 


90,000.00 


57,324.20 


99,604.21 


0.00 


30,000.00 


30,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


10,000.00 


7,980.40 


0.00 


2,019.60 


100,000.00 


98,588.51 


174,594.10 


0.00 


100.000.00 


00 


0.00 


100.000.00 


1,594,419.29 


1,272,133.84 


549,621.88 


246,194.16 


700,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


700,000.00 


3,995,690.00 


3,995,690.00 


0.00 


0.00 


40,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


40,000.00 


4,271.00 


830.00 


0.00 


3,441.00 


441,569.00 


441,569.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,537.00 


6,527.00 


0.00 


10.00 


10,420.00 


7,860.00 


0.00 


2,560.00 


6,728.00 


6,717.00 


0.00 


11.00 


48,435.00 


46,962.00 


0.00 


1,473.00 


2,289,622.00 


1,963,446.00 


0.00 


326,176.00 


75,741.00 


74,862.00 


0.00 


879.00 


21,000.00 


25,500.00 


0.00 


(4,500.00) 


47.694.00 


49.159.00 


0.00 


(1.465.00) 


7,687,707.00 


6,619,122.00 


0.00 


1,068,585.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,500.00 


750.00 


0.00 


750.00 


0.00 


1,730.00 


0.00 


5,050.00 


0.00 


0.00 


13,649.90 


0.00 


15,360.00 


15,362.00 


2,246.94 


4,195.06 


0.00 


0.00 


58.717.23 


0.00 


22,860.00 


23,842.00 


74,614.07 


9,995.06 


115,760.00 


115,608.50 


0.00 


151.50 


0.00 


191,009.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,437.00 


0.00 


5,434.42 


44,000.00 


43,842.32 


0.00 


157.68 


36,700.00 


36,700.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,100.00 


29,890.00 


0.00 


210.00 


110,500.00 


110,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,051.41 


0.00 


53,000.00 


51,450.00 


0.00 


1,550.00 


241,000.00 


96,135.85 


144,864.15 


0.00 


46,600.00 


45,555.00 


0.00 


1,045.00 


0.00 


0.00 


29,930.04 


0.00 


0.00 


58,112.55 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


148,112.55 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


186.749.00 


0.00 


48.651.00 


677,660 00 


1 115,101 77 


204,845.60 




69,569,620.00 


68,042,809.37 


1,993,825.96 


1,727,367.04 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 

Capital 





Actual Fiscal 
2009 


Actual Fiscal 
2010 


Actual Fiscal 
2011 


Projects 
2011 


Total 
2011 


Revenues: 












Water Receivables Rates 


3,050,637.87 


3,116,631.25 


3,638,134.79 


0.00 


3,638,134.79 


Water Receivables Services 


20,178.88 


7,524.93 


11,853.01 


0.00 


11,853.01 


Water Receivables Industrial 


20,323.62 


13,284.16 


50.00 


0.00 


50.00 


Water Receivables Connections 


81,750.91 


31,189.50 


38,168.75 


0.00 


38,168.75 


Water Receivables Fire Protection 


321,705.07 


333,274.12 


338,468.06 


0.00 


338,468.06 


Water Receivables Cross Connections 


zy,4Z / .oy 


oU,Uo4.Zo 


/IK toi rr a 

4o, /ol.oU 


U.UU 


ac 7qi en 
4o, /ol.oU 


Water Liens 


iyo, /yy.oy 


lbo,Zlb. 1Z 


OQ7 nco AO 
ZZ /.Uoo.Uo 


U.UU 


OQ7 ACQ HQ 

ZZ /,UOo.Uo 


Miscellaneous 


56,096.68 


5,898.22 


11,211.80 


0.00 


11,211.80 


Reimbursements 


858.712.12 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


4,634,632.13 


3,701,102.55 


4,310,675.94 


0.00 


4,310,675.94 


Operating Costs 


3.404.454.77 


3.123.195.57 


2,929.483.04 


1.117.069.81 


4.046.552.85 


Total Operating Costs 


3,404,454.77 


3,123,195.57 


2,929,483.04 


1,117,069.81 


4,046,552.85 


Excess Revenues over Operating Costs 


1,230,177.36 


577,906.98 


1,381,192.90 


(1,117,069.81) 


264,123.09 


Other Financial Sources(Uses) 












Issuance of Bond Anticipation Notes 




100,000.00 






0.00 


Retirement of Bond Anticipation Notes 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds & 
Notes 








(100,000.00) 
1,600,000.00 


(100,000.00) 
1,600,000.00 


Operating Transfers 






87,661.18 




87,661.18 


Total Other Financial Sources/Uses 












Transfer to General Fund for Debt Service, 












Employees Benefits and Allocated Charges 


663,583.00 


711,053.00 


734,495.00 


0.00 


734.495.00 


Excess of revenues and other sources over 












(under) expenditures and other uses 


566,594.36 


(33,146.02) 


734,359.08 


382,930.19 


1,117,289.27 


Total Fund Balance - Beginning 


3,058,746.56 


3,625,340.92 


3,746,780.43 


(154,585.53) 


3,592,194.90 


Total Fund Balance - Ending 


3,625,340.92 


3,592,194.90 


4,481,139.51 


228,344.66 


4,709,484.17 



-31- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 









Aerial 


Shawsheen 










Main 


Public 


Ladder 


School 




WHS 


Total 




Street 


Safety 


Truck - Fire 


Window 


Sewer 


Feasibility 


(Memorandum 




Sewer 


Building 


Dept. 


Replace 


Interceptor 


Study 


Only) 


Town Meeting Dates 


4/22/89 


4/26/97 


5/2/2009 


5/2/2009 


5/2/2009 


5/1/2010 




Initial Project Authorization 


747,000 


7,986,000 




715.000 


1,250,000 


1.125,000 


12.798.000 


REVENUES: 
















Intergovernmental 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


104,798.00 


104,798.00 


Miscellaneous 


0.00 


0.00 


15.684.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


15.684.00 


Total Revenue 


0.00 


0.00 


15,684.00 


0.00 


0.00 


104,798.00 


120,482.00 


EXPENDITURES: 
















Capital Outlay 
















Total Expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


931,277.21 


58.163.75 


354.668.68 


283,341.48 


1,627.451.12 


Excess of revenues 
















over/under expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


(915,593.21) 


(58,163.75) 


(354,668.68) 


(178,543.48) 


(1,506,969.12) 


Other Financial Sources(Uses) 
















Issuance of Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Retirement of Bond Anticipation 
















Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(1,250,000.00) 


0.00 


(1,250,000.00) 


Proceeds of General Obligation 
















Bonds & Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


975,000.00 


715,000.00 


1,250,000.00 


0.00 


2,940,000.00 


Operating Transfers 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


579,712.00 


579,712.00 


Total Other Financial Sources/Uses 


0.00 


0.00 


975,000.00 


715,000.00 


0.00 


579,712.00 


2,269,712.00 


Excess of revenues and other sources 
















over (under) expenditures and other 
















uses 


0.00 


0.00 


59.406.79 


656,836.25 


(354.668.68) 


401,168.52 


762,742.88 


FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 2010 


56,000.60 


3,615.92 


0.00 


0.00 


433,250.71 


0.00 


492,867.23 


FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 201 1 




3,615.92 


59,406.79 


656,836.25 


78.582.03 


401,168.52 


1,255,610.11 



-32- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2011 



DESCRIPTION 



YEAR 
ISSUE 



YEAR 
DUE 



RATE 



ORIGINAL 
PRINCIPAL 
AMOUNT 



PRINCIPAL 
OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30, 2010 



BOND 
ADDITIONS 



PRINCIPAL 
RETIREMENTS 



PRINCIPAL 
OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30, 2011 



INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



Comprehensive Middle 
School 



Public Safety Building 



06/2001 06/2011 4.5-5.0 24,300,000 



High School Renovation 06/2001 06/2011 4.5-5.0 975,000 



06/2001 06/2011 4.5-5.0 



5,986,000 



2,441,500 



97,500 



586,000 



2,441,500 
97,500 
586,000 



Public Safety Building 

General Government Land 
Purchase 



06/2001 06/2011 4.5-5.0 



12/2005 06/2011 3.9 



2,000,000 



200,000 



67.000 



200,000 



67,000 



Main Street Sewer Project 06/2001 06/2011 4.5-5.0 



985,000 



95,000 



95,000 



MWRA Collateral 
Agreement 



02/2003 02/2011 



119,350 



25,080 



25,080 



Remodeling Shawsheen 
School 



08/2010 08/2020 2.63 



715,000 



715,000 



715,000 



Equipment-Ladder Truck 08/2010 08/2020 2.63 



975,000 



975,000 



975,000 



Sewer 



8/2010 8/2030 2.81 



1.250.000 



1,250,000 



1.250,000 



TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



37,305,350 



3,512,080 2,940,000 



3,512,080 



2,940,000 



OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



Water 



8/2010 8/2030 2.81 



1,6011,000 



1.600.000 



1.600.000 



TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 



1,600,000 



1,600,000 



1,600,000 



GRAND TOTAL 



38,905,350 



3,512,080 4,540,000 



3,512,080 



4.540,000 



-33- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF EXPENDABLE AND NON-EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 201 1 



Balance June 30, 2010 

Investment 





Non- Expend 


Expendable 


Adjustment 


Total 


Bequests 


Income 


S. Carter Common Fund 


200.00 


1,336.74 




1,536.74 


0.00 


46.95 


SDJ Carter Lecture Fund 


6,000.00 


3,650.69 




9,650.69 


0.00 


274.73 


Library Funds: 














Benjamin Buck 


500.00 


0.00 




500.00 


0.00 


15.28 


Burnap 


200.00 


15.86 




215.86 


0.00 


6.59 


Chester M. Clark 


500.00 


89.05 




589.05 


0.00 


18.00 


Charlotte C. Smith 


500.00 


244.30 




744.30 


0.00 


22.74 


Stanley Webber 


0.00 


2.55 




2.55 


0.00 


0.08 


Walker School Fund 


275.00 


1,440.20 




1,715.20 


0.00 


52.40 


Housing Partnership 


0.00 


112,766.61 




112,766.61 


0.00 


3,445.27 


Winifred Richardson Trust 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


25,000.00 


0.00 


Cemetery Funds 


792,864.67 


14,596.10 




807,460.77 


24,350.00 


25,404.33 


Biggar Scholarship 


25,000.00 


8,056.58 




33,056.58 


0.00 


1,009.95 


Scott D. Braciska Scholarship 


0.00 


22,174.17 




22,174.17 


0.00 


654.55 


Altman Fam Education Trust 


25,000.00 


200.99 




25,200.99 


0.00 


769.94 


Justin O'Neil Scholarship 


0.00 


7,343.25 




7,343.25 


0.00 


178.52 


Elderly Services 


0.00 


48,405.14 




48,405.14 


20,589.00 


188.90 


Carney-Veterans Fund 


0.00 


24.32 




24.32 


0.00 


0.00 


Loddy Weisberg & Lena Leiter Scholar 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


125,000.00 


10.00 


Town Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


12,714.73 




12,714.73 


3,876.25 


354.13 


WHS Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


84,835.60 




84,835.60 


10,915.00 


2,183.72 


Zeneca Settlement 


0.00 


5,912.51 




5,912.51 


0.00 


18.10 


Invest. Fund Conservation 


0.00 


562.32 




562.32 


0.00 


2.12 


Confined Space 


0.00 


410.21 




410.21 


0.00 


0.00 


Employee's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


626,136.85 




626,136.85 


2,980,169.06 


3,890.94 


Employer's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


345,033.21 




345,033.21 


602,756.13 


0.00 


Olin Chemical 


0.00 


55,393.42 




55,393.42 


0.00 


169.44 


Andover St. Traffic Lights 


0.00 


17.62 




17.62 


0.00 


0.00 


Tracy Circle 


0.00 


5,843.47 




5,843.47 


0.00 


17.89 


Barrows Aud. Renovation 


0.00 


943.25 




943.25 


0.00 


28.82 


Flex Spending Town & School 


0.00 


9,981.28 




9,981.28 


169,190.28 


0.00 


Ambulance 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Middlesex Pines I & II 


0.00 


7,391.68 




7,391.68 


0.00 


22.61 


Adoption 


0.00 


412.67 




412.67 


0.00 


1.29 


193 Ballardvale 


0.00 


1,436.63 




1,436.63 


0.00 


4.40 


National Grid Transfer 


0.00 


20,000.00 




20,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund 


0.00 


36,053.35 


(262.12) 


35,791.23 


129,285.59 


436.05 


Student Activity Fund Wildwood 


0.00 


2,910.44 


10.95 


2,921.39 


2,377.05 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Boutwell 


0.00 


(339.63) 


0.66 


(338.97) 


1,621.85 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Middle School 


0.00 


42,797.26 


155.75 


42,953.01 


210,643.84 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund No. Intermediate 


0.00 


1,754.46 


9.35 


1,763.81 


15,044.12 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund West Intermediate 


0.00 


3,292.81 


11.35 


3,304.16 


6,934.28 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund ^Voburn Street 


n no 

u.uu 




32.90 




9^1 834 1 fi 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Shawsheen 


0.00 


11,272.30 


41.16 


11,313.46 


10,745.94 


0.00 


Student Activity Fund Reserve 


0.00 


75,414.97 




75,414.97 


0.00 


0.00 


Tailings 


0.00 


(3,738.63) 




(3,738.63) 


0.00 


0.00 


Tax Title Recordings 


0.00 


750.00 




750.00 


280.00 


0.00 


Street Openings 


0.00 


120,400.00 




120,400.00 


16,300.00 ■ 


0.00 


Dog Licenses 


0.00 


94,457.00 




94,457.00 


20,219.50 


0.00 


Sporting Licenses 


0.00 


7,668.30 




7,668.30 


6,742.60 


0.00 


Firearms Permits 


0.00 


6,462.50 




6,462.50 


18,650.00 


0.00 


Outside Details: Police 


0.00 


(13,201.16) 




(13,201.16) 


328,351.88 


0.00 


Outside Details: Fire 


0.00 


10,896.23 




10,896.23 


22,051.97 


0.00 


Outside Details: Public Buildings 


0.00 


4,909.07 




4,909.07 


68,251.35 


0.00 


Forfeiture Deposits 


0.00 


30,330.00 




30,330.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Performance Bonds 


0.00 


99.44 




99.44 


366,918.19 


0.00 


Meals Tax 


0.00 


107.69 




107.69 


863.42 


0.00 


GRAND TOTAL 


851,039.67 


1,838,723.71 


0.00 


2,689,763.38 


5,212,961.46 


39,227.74 



-34- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF EXPENDABLE AND NON-EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 



Balance June 30, 2011 





Transfers 


Expenditure 


Non- Expend 


Expendable 


Total 


S. Carter Common Fund 


0.00 


0.00 


200.00 


1,383.69 


1,583.69 


SDJ Carter Lecture Fund 


0.00 


658.54 


6,000.00 


3,266.88 


9,266.88 


Library Funds: 












Benjamin Buck 


0.00 


0.00 


500.00 


15.28 


515.28 


Burnap 


0.00 


0.00 


200.00 


22.45 


222.45 


Chester M. Clark 


0.00 


0.00 


500.00 


107.05 


607.05 


Charlotte C. Smith 


0.00 


0.00 


500.00 


267.04 


767.04 


Stanley Webber 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.63 


2.63 


Walker School Fund 


0.00 


0.00 


275.00 


1,492.60 


1,767.60 


Housing Partnership 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


116,211.88 


116,211.88 


Winifred Richardson Trust 


0.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


Cemetery Funds 


0.00 


300.00 


816,914.67 


40,000.43 


856,915.10 


Biggar Scholarship 


0.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


9,066.53 


34,066.53 


Scott D. Braciska Scholarship 


0.00 


750.00 


0.00 


22,078.72 


22,078.72 


Altman Fam Education Trust 


0.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


970.93 


25,970.93 


Justin O'Neil Scholarship 


0.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


6,021.77 


6,021.77 


Elderly Services 


0.00 


18,100.58 


0.00 


51,082.46 


51,082.46 


Carney-Veterans Fund 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


24.32 


24.32 


Loddy Weisberg & Lena Leiter Scholar 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


125,010.00 


125,010.00 


Town Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


5,000.00 


0.00 


11,945.11 


11,945.11 


WHS Scholarship Fund 


0.00 


24,775.00 


0.00 


73,159.32 


73,159.32 


Zeneca Settlement 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


5,930.61 


5,930.61 


Invest. Fund Conservation 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


564.44 


564.44 


Confined Space 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


410.21 


410.21 


Employee's Health & Life Insurance 


0.00 


3,142,763.92 


0.00 


467,432.93 


467,432.93 


Employer's Health & Life Insurance 


8,850,000.00 


9,426,607.96 


0.00 


371,181.38 


371,181.38 


Olin Chemical 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


55,562.86 


55,562.86 


Andover St. Traffic Lights 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


17.62 


17.62 


Tracy Circle 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


5,861.36 


5,861.36 


Barrows Aud. Renovation 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


972.07 


972.07 


Flex Spending Town & School 


0.00 


177,505.72 


0.00 


1,665.84 


1,665.84 


Ambulance 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Middlesex Pines I & II 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


7,414.29 


7,414.29 


Adoption 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


413.96 


413.96 


193 Ballardvale 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,441.03 


1,441.03 


National Grid Transfer 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


Student Activity Fund 


0.00 


123,186.66 


0.00 


42,326.21 


42,326.21 


Student Activity Fund Wildwood 


0.00 


900.00 


0.00 


4,398.44 


4,398.44 


Student Activity Fund Boutwell 


0.00 


587.72 


0.00 


695.16 


695.16 


Student Activity Fund Middle School 


0.00 


226,015.84 


0.00 


27,581.01 


27,581.01 


Student Activity Fund No. Intermediate 


0.00 


15,538.96 


0.00 


1,268.97 


1,268.97 


Student Activity Fund ^Vest Intermediate 


0.00 


6,762.94 


0.00 


3,475.50 


3,475.50 


Student Activity Fund Woburn Street 


0.00 


27,869.82 


0.00 


7,052.55 


7,052.55 


Student Activity Fund Shawsheen 


0.00 


17,623.92 


0.00 


4,435.48 


4,435.48 


Student Activity Fund Reserve 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


75,414.97 


75,414.97 


Tailings 


0.00 


13,087.04 


0.00 


(16,825.67) 


(16,825.67) 


Tax Title Recordings 


0.00 


975.00 


0.00 


55.00 


55.00 


Street Openings 


0.00 


35,300.00 


0.00 


101,400.00 


101,400.00 


Dog Licenses 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


114,676.50 


114,676.50 


Sporting Licenses 


0.00 


6,478.00 


0.00 


7,932.90 


7,932.90 


Firearms Permits 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


25,112.50 


25,112.50 


Outside Details: Police 


0.00 


309,232.36 


0.00 


5,918.36 


5,918.36 


Outside Details: Fire 


0.00 


22,283.48 


0.00 


10,664.72 


10,664.72 


Outside Details: Public Buildings 


0.00 


78,251.92 


0.00 


(5,091.50) 


(5,091.50) 


Forfeiture Deposits 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,330.00 


30,330.00 


Performance Bonds 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


367,017.63 


367,017.63 


Meals Tax 


0.00 


857.41 


0.00 


113.70 


113.70 


GRAND TOTAL 


8,850,000.00 


13,682,912.79 


900,089.67 


2,208,950.12 


3,109,039.79 



-35- 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the operations, activities and 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department for the year 2011. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, six Lieutenants, thirty-two Fire Fighters, one 
full-time clerk, and one part-time clerk. The following roster is provided: 



Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III 

Lieutenants 

John Brown, Jr. 
Gary J. Donovan 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Richard T. McClellan 
Joseph T. McMahon 
Gary P. Robichaud 

Clerks 

Linda K. Cerullo 
Isabel E. Raschella - Part-Time 




Kristen Gtyglik of Liberty Mutual presents check to the 
Town of Wilmington, one often communities in America 
to earn a $10,000 Be Fire Smart grant. 



Fire Fighters 



Anthony J. Adamczyk 
Brian D. Anderson 
George A. Anderson, Jr. 
Thomas C. Casella 
William F. Cavanaugh, III 
Thomas W. Ceres 
Walter R. Daley 
David R. Feyler 
Kenneth P. Gray 
Brooke C. Green 
Eric M. Gronemeyer 
Jacob H. Gronemeyer 
William J. Herrick, Jr. 
Keith E. Kelly 
Jason M. Kennedy 
William J. Kent, III 



Andrew W. Leverone 
John F. McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Michael J. McManus 
Erik J. Nansel 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Christopher G. Pozzi 
Eric S. Robbins 
Frederick J. Ryan 
Megan L. Sullivan 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Rann R. Tingtella 
Robert W. Varey, III 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



-36- 



The department responded to a total of 3,635 calls for assistance during 201 1. 



Patient Assist 


71 


Line Box, Mutual Aid 


5 


Commercial Building Fire 


3 


Lockout of Building/House 


13 


Bomb Scare 


1 


Medical Aid 


1,465 


Master Box 


191 


Mutual Aid - Ambulance 


176 


Burning Permits 


243 


Mutual Aid - Fire 


23 


Brush Fire 


23 


Motor Vehicle Crash 


289 


Chimney Fire 


4 


Odor, Any type 


20 


Carbon Monoxide 


47 


Pump Job 


11 


Gas Leaks 


14 


Service Call 


25 


Fire Drill 


57 


Smoke in Building 


13 


Haz Mat Incident 


1 


Smoke Detector Activation 


19 


Inspections/26F, Oil, Propane 


549 


Residential House/Structure 


7 


Tnvp^tityatinrm Anv Tvr»p 

i ji v \ nui^iH juiii^, nil v i y 


292 


Training, Any Type 


10 


Kpltron Antiv^tinn 

IVCltlUll <T1L1 l/l V d 11U11 


3 


Truck/Car Fire 


15 


Stnvp p lrp 

k ) 1 W V v 1 11 c 


4 


Wires Arcing 


41 


Estimated value of property endangered 


was $5,160,000. Estimated property loss was 


$839,000. 


The following is a list of permits issued: 








Black Powder 


1 


Propane 


57 


Blasting 


2 


Smoke Detector 


171 


Class C Explosive 


1 


Tank 


64 


Fire Alarm 


118 


Miscellaneous 


2 


Flammable Liquid 


30 


Sprinkler 


52 


Oil Burner 


189 


Gas Stations 


11 


Truck 


9 


Reports 


28 


Welding 


16 


Carnival 


1 


Plan Review 


72 


Suppression 


2 


Copies 


30 


Dumpster 


21 


Oil Lines 


1 










TOTAL 


878 



A new ambulance arrived and was placed in service March 2011 to replace the 2001 Ambulance 2. The 
Department currently staffs two front line ambulances to handle the ever increasing demand for 
emergency medical service. 

A rapid response vehicle was ordered in September 2011 with an anticipated delivery date of May 2012. 

As required by law, the Fire Prevention Bureau under the direction of Lt. Daniel Hurley inspected all 
schools, public buildings, nursing homes and flammable storage facilities. Other inspections listed 
below: 



New Residential Plans Review 37 

New Residential Fire Inspections 37 

New Industrial Plans Review 35 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 35 

Underground Tank Removals 5 

Underground Tank Installations 

Aboveground Tank Removals 57 

Oil Burner/Tank 189 

Propane 57 

Nursing Home Inspections 12 

Gas Station Inspections 1 1 



Oil Truck & Pick-up Transfer Tank Inspections 16 



-37- 



Shift personnel inspected 171 residential properties for smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 148, Section 26F. 

Classrooms at all of the public schools K-5 and the Abundant Life Christian School and Learning 
Center grades K-8 received instruction on fire safety by Lt. Daniel Hurley and Fire Fighters 
Frederick J. Ryan, Christopher G. Pozzi, Megan L. Sullivan, Brooke C. Green, David P. Woods and 
Eric S. Robbins. 

Safe Prom mock car crash for Wilmington High School Seniors was conducted on May 10, 2011 by 
Lts. Daniel Hurley and Richard T. McClellan and Fire Fighters William F. Cavanaugh, Thomas W. 
Ceres, William J. Herrick and Robert W. Varey along with Wilmington Police Department and 
Wilmington High School S.A.D.D. students. 

The project to replace the outdated wire line fire alarm system continues with a January 2012 switch to 
the new wireless system. Thirty-three radio box systems have been completed with forty-one in 
progress. 

The Wilmington Fire Department made major progress in safety in 2011 by implementing new incident 
response procedures. After analyzing the various requests for service, emergent or otherwise, the Fire 
Department Command Staff looked at the warranted response to each incident. It was obvious that not 
every call was an emergency and thus the use of emergency warning lights and sirens was not always 
necessary. With a plan in mind, a "coded response" protocol was placed into operation. 

The new response protocols enhance the safety of fire fighters who are responding and to traffic 
encountered along the response route. As always, and for the safety of all concerned, one must pull over 
and stop when in the path of an emergency vehicle that is using its warning devices; including lights, 
sirens and horns. 

We are happy to announce for the second year in a row the Wilmington Fire Department has won 
$10,000 from Liberty Mutual for the 2011 Fire Safety Pledge. Thank you to all who participated in the 
on-line contest. With this award we were able to purchase a LUCAS chest compression system to assist 
with cardiac arrest patients. 

I wish to extend my sincere appreciation to all members of the Fire Department for their continued 
dedication and professionalism providing this vital service to the residents of the Town. 

As always, the support of the Police Department as well as Dispatch is appreciated. 



I would like to acknowledge the Town 
Manager for his continued support of the 
Fire Department as well as the Assistant 
Manager, Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee and all other Town agencies for 
their assistance during the past year. 




Chief Bradbury accepts donation from Dianna DiGregorio, 
President, Wilmington Community Fund. 



-38- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the annual 
report on the activities of the Wilmington Police Department for the year 2011. 

The Police Department responded to approximately 20,000 calls for service and incidents which were 
discovered on scene by the officers in 2011. Although this number is slightly down from last year the 
pace of response and workload increased for all members of the department. Personnel shortages 
throughout the year due to retirements, military deployment, illness and new personnel in recruit 
training attributed to this increase in workload. This increased demand on personnel resources 
ordinarily decreases proactive policing measures and places an increased dependence on reactive 
policing techniques. I am pleased to report, although the department experienced almost a 20% 
decrease in line personnel at various times throughout the year, our productivity levels remained 
relatively steady with previous year's statistics. Our commitments to the School Resource, DARE 
and Safety Officer programs remained active and fully staffed. The importance of these programs 
justifies our continued attention and support. Although temporary, positions within the Detective 
Bureau and Traffic Division have been reduced. Our plan in the coming year is to maintain a fully 
staffed department and replace the temporary personnel reductions in our specialist positions as 
well as equalize shift staffing. Elimination of grant funds for community programs such as Rape 
Aggression Defense (RAD) and Citizens CPR have reduced the number of classes offered this year. 

Our partnership with the Wilmington Public Schools has continued to be successful in keeping our 
schools safe and in maintaining our efforts to reduce school attendance issues throughout the 
district. Along with the Middlesex District Attorney's Office and the Wilmington Public Schools we 
continue participation in the Community Base Justice Program and Middlesex Partnership for 
Youth. This year Officer Brian Gillis replaced Officer Brain Hermann as the School Resource Officer 
at Wilmington High School. Officer Gillis assumed these duties in the beginning of the school year. 

Our membership in the North East Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council remains strong. The 
department has members on the Special Weapon and Tactics (SWAT) team, Regional Response 
Team (RRT) and the Detectives and School Threat Assessment and Response System (STARS). The 
expertise and training received through membership on these teams is invaluable to the department. 
We continue our assignment of Task Force Agents in the DEA and FBI while working trans- 
jurisdictional cases in high level drug investigations, organized crime and terrorism. 

The Police Department received two prestigious awards in 2011. First was State Accreditation, 
awarded by the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission. Wilmington was the 39 th Police 
Department in Massachusetts to receive this honor. Accreditation requires the acceptance of up to 
382 standards. Two hundred fifty seven of the standards are mandatory and 125 are optional 
requiring compliance of 55 percent. Wilmington Police exceeded this percentage. Standards that do 
not apply to Wilmington can be waived by the Commission. The benefits to accreditation are self 
assessment and strict compliance with standards nationally approved for a professional police 
agency. Our second achievement was the award of the highest honors in the Gold Award category of 
the Massachusetts Law Enforcement Challenge. This is the fifth highest award in the 
Commonwealth. Again self assessment is the driving force to our success in this competition. 

The department has re-engineered the Wilmington Auxiliary Police Department. The Certification 
and Accreditation process mandated the development of professional standards for this important 
organization. An application process has begun to reinvigorate this all volunteer organization. The 
Auxiliary Police force is an invaluable division of the Wilmington Police Department. Members 
volunteer services during critical incidents such as natural and manmade disasters. They support 
civic organization and town events during the year by directing traffic and providing crowd 
coordination efforts. These essential tasks are key elements for providing safe and memorable 
events throughout the year. 



-39- 




Officer Palmer and Renin 



The department experienced several changes in its roster in 
2011. Officers Francis D. Hancock and Jon C. Shepard retired 
from police service in February and October respectively. 
Officers Jonathan Carlson and Walter A. Varey were hired as 
their replacements. Officer Carlson graduated from the 
Massachusetts Bay Transit Police Academy receiving three 
awards of excellence. Officer Varey followed with his 
graduation from the Lowell Police Academy. Both Officers are 
veterans of the armed services. K-9 Kimo gained an assistant in 
K-9 Ronin. Due to Kimo's expected retirement in January 2012, 
Ronin attended the Boston Police K-9 academy with handler 
Officer Eric T. Palmer. K-9 Kimo and Officer Palmer were the 
recipients of multiple first place awards at competitions 
throughout the northeast and nationally. Kimo was always a 
fan favorite as he performed many demonstrations throughout 
the community. His reputation for excellence as a K-9 while 
working regionally was second to none. 



Sadly, Officer Shawn W. Lee lost an almost year long battle with Leukemia in December of 2011. 
Shawn was a ten year veteran officer with the Wilmington Police Department. During Shawn's 
service, he was the recipient of several commendations for his exemplary service and bravery. 
Shawn served as a Field Training Officer, member of the NEMLEC RRT and was a dedicated 
member of the Wilmington Police Honor Guard. Shawn was also a United States Air Force Veteran. 
Shawn's dedication to the residents of Wilmington was rivaled only by his love for his family and his 
country. As a servant of the community, his impact on the successes shared by this Department will 
be his legacy. 

As always, the members of the Wilmington Police Department would like to express their sincere 
appreciation for the support we have received from the community in 2011. Without the respect, 
compassion and commitment of the residential and business communities our successes could not 
have been realized. 



The following was the Departmental Roster of Personnel for 2011: 



Chief of Police 

Michael R. Begonis 

Deputy Chief 

Robert V. Richter 



Lieutenants 

Joseph A. Desmond, Operations/Grants 
J. Christopher Neville, Detective 
Scott A. Sencabaugh, Emergency Planning/Training 
Brian T. Pupa, Accreditation and Policy Development 

Sergeants 

Christopher J. Ahern Charles R. Fiore 

David L. Axelrod David M. McCue, Jr. 

David J. Bradbury Daniel E. Murray 



Detectives and Specialists 



James R. White, Court/Inspector 
Julie M. Pozzi, DARE 
Thomas A. Miller, Inspector 
David A. Sugrue, Inspector 
Patrick B. Nally, Inspector 



Brian J. Stickney, Inspector 
John M. Bossi, Narcotics 
Brian M. Moon, Safety Officer 
Chester A. Bruce, III, School Resource 
Brian Gillis, School Resource 



-40- 



Uniform Patrol Officers 

Ronald J. Alpers, Jr. 
Dan C. Cadigan 
Jonathan Carlson 
Paul R. Chalifour 
John W. Delorey 
Daniel P. D'Eon 
Christopher J. Dindo 
Richard A. DiPerri, Jr. 
Anthony Fiore 
Brian J. Gillis 

Francis D. Hancock (Retired) 
Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 
Paul W. Jepson 

Clerical Staff 

Julie G. Clark 
Susan M. O'Neil 



Paul A. Krzeminski 
Shawn W. Lee 
Louis Martignetti 
Stephen F. Mauriello 
Thomas A. McConologue 
Eric T. Palmer/ K-9 KIMO/RONIN 
Michael J. Patterson 
Dennis P. Rooney 
Jon C. Shepard (Retired) 
Matthew D. Stavro 
Brian D. Thornton 
Michael W. Wandell 
Walter A. Varey 




-41- 



The following are some statistical data that reflect calls for service over the past year. 
Wilmington Police Department Statistics, Year 2011 



ARRESTS OR SUMMONS: 




SEX CRIMES: 




Arson 





Rape 


10 


Assault & Battery 


67 


Indecent Exposure 





Breaking & Entering 


16 


Indecent A&B 


2 


Counterfeiting/Forgery 


4 


Other 


_0 


Disorderly 


2 


TOTAL SEX CRIMES: 


12 


Larceny 


30 






Larceny Motor Vehicle 


2 


MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS: 




Liquor Laws 


22 


Seat Belt 


314 


Malicious Damage 


17 


Using Without Authority 





Murder 





License Violations 


202 


Narcotics 


32 


Endangering 


21 


OUI, Drunk Driving 


57 


Leaving Scene Property Damage 


20 


Rape 


1 


Operating Under Influence 


57 


Receiving Stolen Property 


14 


Unregistered/Uninsured 


161 


Robbery 


1 


Speed 


1,785 


Sex Offenses, not Rape 


1 


Other 


1,887 


Other 


234 


TOTAL VIOLATIONS SHOWN: 


4,447 


TOTAL: 


500 










CITATIONS ISSUED: 




PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 




Warnings 


2,348 


Ages: 




Complaints 


108 


Under 12 





Non-Criminal 


897 


13/14 





Arrests 


93 


15 





TOTAL CITATIONS: 


3,446 


16 


3 






17 


1 


CRIMES REPORTED: 




TOTAL UNDER 18: 


4 


Threats - Arson, Bombing, Killing 


17 






Assault & Battery, Assault: 




1 Q 


Q 

o 


Firearm or Knife 


U 


19 


1 


Other Weapon 


13 


20 


8 


Aggravated - Hand/Foot 


16 


21 


1 


Simple - A&B, Assault 


72 


22 


1 


TOTAL A&B's, ASSAULTS, THREATS: 


118 


23 


1 






24 


3 


BREAKING & ENTERING: 




25/34 


11 


Residential 


46 


35/54 


22 


Non Residential 


45 


55 & Over 


_4 


Attempted 


_3 


TOTAL OVER 18: 


55 


TOTAL BREAKING & ENTERING: 


94 


TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY 


59 


ROBBERY: 








Firearm 









Other Weapon 


1 






Strong Arm 









TOTAL ROBBERIES: 


1 



-42- 



LARCENIES: 




INCIDENTS REPORTED: 




Larceny From Person 


7 


Warrants Served 


106 


Credit Card Fraud 


24 


Disturbances 


439 


Shoplifting 


7 


Domestic Problems No Arrests 


173 


From Motor Vehicle 


14 


Assist Other Agencies 


719 


M/V Parts & Accessories 


32 


Medical Emergency 


1,246 


Bikes 


5 


Juvenile Complaints 


29 


From Buildings 


15 


Suspicious Activity, Person, Vehicle 


1,516 


From Coin Machines 





Malicious Damage Complaints 


162 


Other 


183 


Missing Persons 


59 


TOTAL LARCENIES: 


287 


Other Calls/Complaints 


11,518 






M/V Accidents 


827 


Forgery, Uttering, Identity Fraud 


35 


Alarms 


1,218 






Traffic Complaint 


1,944 


MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN: 




TOTAL: 


19,956 


Autos 


6 






Trucks & Buses 


2 


OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS: 




Other Vehicles 


_3 


Restraining Orders Served 


148 


TOTAL M/V THEFT: 


11 


Parking Tickets Issued 


141 






Firearms I.D. Issued 


40 


RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES: 




License To Carry Issued 


276 


Stolen Wilmington 




Gunsmith Permits 


1 


and Recovered Wilmington 


2 


Reports to Insurance 




Stolen Wilmington 




Companies and Attorneys 


560 


and Recovered Out of Town 


2 


Animal Complaints 


760 


Stolen Out of Town 




Child Safety Seats 


234 


and Recovered Wilmington 


2 


Motor Vehicle Stops 


4,821 


TOTAL RECOVERED: 


6 


TOTAL: 


6,981 




Complaints 687 

Trips 744 

Trip Hours 671.5 

Animals Picked Up 25 

Animals Returned to Owners 17 

Animals Adopted 7 

Animals Picked Up Deceased* 38 

Animals Quarantined 8 

Animals Euthanized 1 

Total Days for Pets in Kennel 99 

Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 201 

Barn Inspections 29 

Citation Fees Issued $125.00 



* Majority of which are wildlife 




Fox wanders through a yard on Grove Avenue. 



-43- 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 



Public 



Buildin 




Department 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town and school 
buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are properly cleaned and maintained for town 
employees, school children and personnel and for the general public. We also repair town-owned 
traffic signals and assist the Water Department in maintaining their buildings. 

The following are highlights for some of the projects completed during 2011: 

Routine maintenance was performed in all school and municipal buildings. 

Voting areas were set up for elections. 

Set up for Fourth of July Festivities. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for musical concerts and plays. 
Food and supplies delivered for each school. 

Chairs, staging and sound system were set up for the Annual Town Meeting and December Special 
Town Meeting. 

All schools were cleaned over the summer and ready for a fresh start to the school year. 

All town buildings' boilers, Univents and exhaust systems were cleaned and serviced over the 
summer. 

A new roof was installed on the 4 th of July building. 

A new roof was installed on the Public Buildings headquarters. 

A new roof was installed on the Department of Public Works garage and office area. 

A new roof was installed on the Sargent Water Treatment Plant. 

A new section of roof was installed on the Wildwood Early Childhood Center. 

All exterior windows and doors were replaced on the Shawsheen Elementary School with a new 
energy efficient system, including the installation of new shades and insulation for energy 
conservation. 

Replacement of roof and signage to the overhang of the front entrance of the Shawsheen Elementary 
School. 

A new Life Safety Fire Alarm system has been designed, put out to bid and will be installed during 
the spring at the Woburn Street School. 

A new Life Safety Fire Alarm system has been designed, put out to bid and will be installed during 
the spring at the North Intermediate School. 

New radio controlled fire alarm Master boxes have been installed to replace the old hardwired 
system. 



-44- 




-45- 



Built a new office for the CARES coordinator and staff at the North Intermediate School. 

Upgraded the security systems at the Shawsheen Elementary and Woburn Street Schools. 

A hot air furnace replacement has been designed and put out to bid for the Boutwell Early Childhood 
Center, which will be installed over the spring break. 

All town-owned traffic signals were maintained and repaired as needed. 

All lighting maintained and repaired for the Town Park, Town Common, tennis courts and the 
exterior of all town-owned buildings. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town departments, 
school administration and especially all the employees of the Public Buildings Department for their 
continued support and cooperation making 2011 a productive year. 




The year 2011 was a busy one for the Permanent Building Committee. Being part of the High School 
Working Group and the High School Building Committee for the design and planning of our new 
high school is an exciting time for all of us involved. We look forward to and are committed to the 
challenge of providing the children of Wilmington with a new state-of-the-art high school with all the 
current technologies, amenities and efficiencies to better their education and a facility that the 
residents of Wilmington can be proud of. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town 
departments, school administration and especially the people of Wilmington in their support and 
cooperation for future projects. 




Shawsheen School Window Replacement Project 




-46- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. Onusseit, hereby respectfully 
submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington Department of Public Works for the year 
2011. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, Cemetery, Parks and 
Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. 

Major Public Works Projects and Programs : 

The Department of Public Works worked on the following major projects during 2011: 
Lawrence Street Sidewalks (Phase I): 

The project consisted of the preparation and installation of approximately 1,960 linear feet of new 
bituminous sidewalks along Lawrence Street from Glen Road to Hamlin Lane. During 2011, the 
infiltrating drainage systems necessary for the construction of the sidewalks were installed, the 
sidewalks were rough graded, minor retaining walls were installed and first course bituminous 
binder pavement was installed. Final sidewalk paving and bituminous curbing installation are 
planned for 2012. 

Whitefield School Field Construction and Irrigation System: 

During the fall of 2010, the existing rough graded field behind the Whitefield School was revitalized 
with new loam, compost and seed to create a public soccer field. During the spring of 2011, the field 
was again reseeded and a new irrigation system was installed utilizing domestic water from a main 
located under Middlesex Avenue (Route 62). The field was utilized in the fall of 2011 by the 
permitted use of Wilmington Youth Soccer (WYSA). 

Chain Link Fence Replacement at the Woburn Street School: 

During the month of October 2011, the existing chain link perimeter fence around the Woburn Street 
School tennis courts and basketball court was replaced with new galvanized 6-gauge chain link 
fence. The project was funded as a capital improvement project under the Department's FY 2012 
budget and was advertised for bid during the spring of 2011. The total cost of the fence replacement 
was $20,750.00. 

Chain Link Fence Replacement & Tennis Court Resurfacing at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center: 
During September of 2011, the existing tennis courts and basketball court at the Boutwell Early 
Childhood Center were resurfaced. The process included a complete cleaning of the existing surface, 
the filling of structural cracks, application of two resurfacing coats and the application of new 
playing surface lines. This project was funded as a capital improvement project under the 
Department's FY 2012 budget. The total cost of the resurfacing was $13,866.00. 

Furthermore, the existing chain link perimeter fence around the tennis courts and basketball court 
was replaced with galvanized 6-gauge chain link fence. The project was funded as a capital 
improvement project under the Department's FY 2012 budget and was advertised for bid during the 
spring of 2011. The total cost of the fence replacement was $25,025.00. 

Repair of Skate Ramps at the Justin O'Neil Skate Park: 

The repair of the skate ramps at the Justin O'Neil Skate Park consisted of the replacement of 20 
sheets of Skatelite Pro ramp surface, 28 sheets of pressure treated plywood, 4 replacement ramp 
enclosures, as well as all associated hardware and a complete screw and safety check of the entire 
park. The work was performed by trained skate park maintenance technicians. The project was 
funded as a capital improvement project under the Department's FY 2012 budget. The total cost of 
the repair was $34,998.76. 



-47- 



Draft Design of the Whipple Road Bridge Deck Replacement: 

During the summer of 2011, the Town of Wilmington signed a joint contract with the towns of 
Billerica and Tewksbury to hire CME Associates, Inc., as a design consultant, to prepare design 
plans to replace the existing deck at the currently closed Whipple Road Bridge. As of the end of 
201 1, CME is in the process of filing Notice of Intent applications with the towns of Wilmington and 
Billerica. The design phase of this project will continue into 2012. 

Eurasian Milfoil Monitoring at Silver Lake: 

Due to the success of the last treatment, there was no need to apply milfoil control herbicides to 
Silver Lake during 2011. End-of-year 2011 lake surveys suggest continued control of the invasive 
species and a lack of visible milfoil in the lake. Monitoring will continue during 2012 and a decision 
will be made on whether treatment in 2012 is necessary. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 




Highway Personnel make Repairs to 
Town Hall Parking Lot. 



All regular highway maintenance work was carried 
out during the year, such as sweeping streets, 
installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the 
roadsides, picking up trash along our roadsides, 
painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, repairing sidewalk and walkway damage, 
painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Drainage : 

Drainage improvements were constructed as part of 
the Lawrence Street Sidewalk Project (Phase I), 
between Glen Road and Hamlin Lane. 

Culvert Replacements : 

A collapsed corrugated metal 30 inch culvert pipe 
across Shady Lane Drive was replaced with a 36 inch 
corrugated plastic pipe culvert. 



A collapsed corrugated metal 12 inch pipe across West Street was replaced with a new 12 inch 
corrugated plastic pipe culvert. 

Roadway Projects: 

Chapter 90 funds from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation were used for bituminous 
concrete resurfacing and associated reconstruction on a total of 20,705 linear feet (4.43 miles) of 
roadway work on the following projects: 



Andover Street 
Concord Street 
Glen Road 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Virginia Road 
Woburn Street 



Jonspin Road to Andover town line (4,900 linear feet) 

Federal Street to Woburn Street (4,130 linear feet) 

Main Street to railroad tracks (4,680 linear feet) 

Nichols Street to Billerica town line (3,420 linear feet) 

North Reading Line to North Reading town line (875 linear feet) 

Wildwood Street to Lowell Street (2,700 linear feet) 



Using town funds, the DPW placed a corrective bituminous concrete shim course on Eames Street 
between Route 38 and the railroad tracks. A final paving of Eames Street is scheduled for 2012. 



Storm Events and Snow & Ice Removal : In August, the DPW responded to the extensive public tree 
damage from Tropical Storm Irene with several weeks of tree and branch cleanup and removal. In 
October, the DPW was again called upon to respond to the public tree damage that resulted from the so- 
called "Halloween Snow Storm." 



-48- 



The Highway Division recorded 106 inches of snow for the winter of 2010-2011. The average annual 
snowfall for Wilmington is approximately 56 inches. 

Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 

The Department of Public Works is responsible for the town's various refuse disposal and recycling 
programs. These programs include household rubbish and recycling; appliance, television and computer 
monitor recycling; yardwaste recycling; waste oil collection and household hazardous waste collection. 
This year 413 cars participated in the Town's Household Hazardous Waste Day held on May 7, 2011. 

Solid Waste and Recycling 

In 2011 the town collected the following amounts of trash and recyclable material: 



Trash Collected at Curbside 
Recyclables Collected at Curbside 
White Goods Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Collected at Curbside 
Yardwaste Delivered to Recycling Center 
Cathode Ray Tubes (TVs, Monitors) Collected 



9,228 Tons 

1,404 Tons (Recycled) 

33 Tons (Recycled) 

1,650 Tons (Recycled) 

600 Tons (Recycled) 

41 Tons (Recycled) 



The yardwaste recycling program continued with the recycling of leaves, grass clippings, brush and 
Christmas trees. In January, 1,771 Christmas trees (approximately 22 tons) were collected at curbside 
by the Department of Public Works. 

Working under a Beneficial Use Determination (BUD) issued by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP), the DPW removed the following waste material from our Yardwaste 
Center in 2011: 



Water Treatment Plant Residuals 1,621 Tons 

Street Sweepings/Catch Basin Cleanings 3,242 Tons 

The mixed material was approved by DEP for cover material at the Amesbury, MA and Merrimac, MA 
sanitary landfills which saved the town approximately $71,500 over what the cost would have been for 
direct disposal. 

Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance 
work such as trimming, cutting, spraying, tree removal 
and tree planting. Roadside trees that were dead or 
interfered with public safety were removed at 
numerous locations. 

The Town Common was illuminated again this year 
with Christmas lights installed by the Tree Division. 
This year the town used approximately 5,700 LED 
lights. LED lights use significantly less energy than 
conventional lights. 




Crews remove debris caused by Tropical Storm Irene. 



Dutch Elm Disease : The Tree Division removed 
25 diseased Dutch Elm trees that were at least 6 
inches in diameter. 

Mosquito Control: The town contracts its 
mosquito control out to the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project 
(CMMCP). The CMMCP practices Integrated 
Mosquito Management (IMM), blending state-of- 
the-art methods and techniques with expertise, 



-49- 



experience and scientific research to provide member communities with modern, environmentally 
sound, cost effective mosquito control. As part of the effort to reduce the need for pesticides, they 
continue to expand their water management program. By cleaning clogged and overgrown waterways, 
mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are restored and water quality is improved. 

BTI mosquito larvicide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are found. They routinely check 
known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to notify them of any areas they suspect could breed 
mosquitoes. Field crews will investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 

The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or larviciding but it is recognized 
that there are times when adult mosquito spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases residential 
and recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted sprayers. 



Cemetery Division (658-3901) 



All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as mowing grass, weeding, 
trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations for monuments, etc. 



BURIALS 

Residents 
Non-Residents 

Moved New Lot/Disinterment 
TOTAL: 

(Cremations - 45; Infants - 2) 
RESERVE 



95 
62 

1 

158 



RECEIPTS 



Interments 

Foundations 

Deeds 

TOTAL: 



$ 94,850.00 

$ 2,978.67 

$ 615.00 

$ 98,443.67 



TRUST FUND 



Sale of Lots 
Refund Reserve 
TOTAL: 



$ 35,375.00 
$ (1.200.00) 
$ 34,175.00 



Perpetual Care 
Refund Trust 
TOTAL: 

$ 166,793.67 



$ 35,375.00 
$ (1,200.00) 
$ 34,175.00 



GRAND TOTAL: 
Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

In 2011, the DPW continued the new approach to turf management on the town's playing fields, which 
was begun in 2010. This turf management program has the goal of improving the safety and playability 
of the town's 39 acres of playing fields using the following program components: 

• Greater use of organic soil amendments and fertilizers to build the long term sustainability of 
the soils. 

• Increased core aerations with the addition of a much greater concentration of sports turf mix. 

• Greater mowing frequency to improve plant health. 




Trees on and around Town Common damaged by Tropical Storm Irene. 



-50- 



In addition to the turf management plan, regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year 
such as cutting grass, trimming shrubs, aerating playing fields, marking ball fields for baseball, softball, 
football, field hockey and soccer. All fields and parks were fertilized and brush was cleared from the air 
vents at all the town's schools. 

Athletic Field Projects : All fields were aerated and fertilized during the year. Alumni Field at the high 
school was top dressed and reseeded in preparation for the start of the fall season. 

The installation of a field irrigation system for the new soccer field behind the former Whitefield School 
was completed in the spring of 2011. This will allow the town to provide a fully maintained field for 
Wilmington's youth soccer players. 

Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions with engineering related 
projects. This included the review of subdivision plans, site plans and special permits for the Planning 
Board, Notice of Intent plan filings for the Conservation Commission and various Board of Appeals 
cases. The Division also established surety estimates for subdivision projects and performed 
construction inspections of subdivision roadways. In addition, surveying services and construction 
inspection were provided for various projects of the Department of Public Works. 



DPW Roof Replacement Project 




Above: (L) Existing roof membrane, underlying fiberglass insulation and old built-up roof were removed 
(R) The gypsum deck was very deteriorated along the rear edge and was completely removed. 

Below: (L) .040 aluminum edge was installed 

(R) Rubberized black granule modified bitumen cap sheet was installed over two base piles 




Water & Sewer Department (978-658-4711) 



Water: 

During the year, the Water Department completed the renovations of an existing wellfield, improved 
water system infrastructure and made necessary upgrades to operational equipment. 

The Browns Crossing Wellfield Replacement Project that began in the fall of 2010 was completed. 
The new wellfield, now located in accessible areas that allow for future maintenance, will increase 
the supply of Town generated water. As part of the renovation, the aged, inefficient pumping 
equipment was replaced with new pumping equipment that meets modern day standards. 
Architectural and structural improvements to the pump station building were also completed. 

The Water Department also had the three water storage tanks in town inspected and cleaned. The 
three tanks, Hillside Way Standpipe, Nassau Avenue Standpipe and Ballardvale Reservoir, were 
individually drained, cleaned and externally and internally inspected by a professional contractor. 
The contractor reported that there were no structural or major problems with any of the tanks. 

A town-wide leak detection survey was performed on all 1,171 fire hydrants, 126 miles of large 
diameter water pipe and 7,471 water service pipes. During the survey, five leaks were found and 
repaired. The estimated leakage from the system was approximately 89,000 gallons per day. On 
average, the Town consumes approximately 2.2 million gallons of water a day. 

A 2011 Ford F-550 utility truck was purchased to replace an aging truck in the fleet. The new, one 
ton utility truck will be capable of storing equipment used by Water Department personnel for 
scheduled maintenance and also for emergency situations such as water main breaks. The new 
truck will also assist in snow removal operations. 

E. H. Sargent Plant, one of the two water treatment plants in town, had a new membrane roof 
installed. The previous roof, which was originally installed in 1989, had deteriorated to a point 
where repairs were costly and impractical. 



Roof Replacement Project at E. H. Sargent Water Treatment Plant 




-52- 



Over the summer, a 1,500 foot section of 10-inch water main in Eames Street was replaced. The 
section, which ran from the railroad spur to Main Street, was replaced with 12-inch ductile iron pipe. 
The upgrade improves fire flow availability to the commercial area located in the southern end of 
town. 



As in previous years, the Water Department continued to use in-house personnel and equipment to 
replace undersized water main. At a cost that is substantially less than hiring external contractors, 
the department replaced approximately 540 linear feet of undersized 2-inch pipe in 2011. Replacing 
the undersized mains with 8-inch or larger ductile iron pipe improves water quality, enhances water 
hydraulics and increases fire protection. 

The 1 1 master meters in our system were inspected and calibrated. All were found to be in good 
condition and are reading accurately. These meters quantify the amount of water pumped from the 
following locations; the aquifer at the pump stations, water into the water treatment plants (WTP), 
water leaving the WTP and water withdrawals at the interconnections with Woburn, Burlington and 
the MWPvA. 



During the months of May and June, a water main flushing and valve-exercising program was 
performed. The department utilizes the flushing of mains to remove sediments and tuberculation 
that have accumulated in the water pipes. Approximately 6.5 million gallons of water was used to 
accomplish this task. This is a necessary procedure to generate the delivery of high-quality potable 
water to your home or business. At this time, all fire hydrants are inspected and repairs are made to 
any that are not in proper working condition. 

We also asked all the owners of the 232 private yard hydrants if they would like us to check their 
hydrants for proper working condition. The majority of owners agreed to this complimentary service 
and 184 inspections were performed. Following these inspections, we provided the owners with a 
written notification of any repairs that were needed. We also lubricated any caps that were not 
easily removed. A detailed breakdown of those who did not participate or hydrants in need of repair 
was sent to the fire department for their knowledge. 

The department maintains and repairs as needed; 126 miles of water mains, 7,471 service 
connections, 1,174 fire hydrants, 754 main valves, 3 storage tanks, 9 pumping stations and 2 water 
treatment facilities in the town. In addition, the department removes snow and ice adjacent to the 
fire hydrants and assists the Highway Division with roadway snow and ice removal. 



Pumping Statistics: 






Wilmington Treated 


GALLONS 


CUBIC FEET 


Maximum per Day 


2,693,086 


360,038 


Maximum per Week 


18,169,169 


2,429,033 


Maximum per Month 


78,604,757 


10,508,657 


MWRA Purchased 






Maximum per Day 


2,007,249 


268,349 


Maximum per Week 


12,734,804 


1,702,514 


Maximum per Month 


20,694,730 


2,766,675 


Combined 






Maximum per Day 


3,818,412 


510,483 


Maximum per Week 


21,436,230 


2,865,806 


Maximum per Month 


89,129,969 


11,915,771 


Average per Day 


2,145,565 


286,840 


Average per Month 


65,260,933 


8,724,724 



-53- 





GALLONS 


CUBIC FEET 


Total Purchased (MWRA) 


88,583,898 


11,842,767 


Total Trpatpd fWilminp+nri'l 


fiQ4 ^47 3ft4 


Q9 Q1 8 


Total Provided for Distribution 


783,131,202 


104,696,685 


Total Pumped from Aquifer (Raw) 


709,097,744 


197,550,602 


r re cipitation statistics; 






Annual Rain Pall rinchps^ 

X 11U1UU1 IvlUll A. (All llllVillV/iJ/ 


52.58" 




Annual Snnw 1 1 fTriPnPQ^ 

ill 111 KACki W X CXli ^AJLlL-llCO/ 


ZfO.OKf 








PERCENTAGE OF 


vuiioUiii yj null ula tiotiuo. 


GALLONS 


fURTC FEET TOT AT, PUMPED 


Municipal Use 


10,736,912 


1,435,416 1.4 


Residential Use 


434,192,458 


58,047,120 55.4 


Commercial Use 


39,929,452 


5,338,162 5.1 


Industrial Use 


236,484,628 


31,615,592 30.2 


Annual Water Main Flushing 


6,495,030 


868,320 0.8 


Miscellaneous Hydrant Use 


1,764,417 


235,885 0.2 


Total Accounted For Pumped 


729,602,896 


97,540,494 93.2 


Unaccounted for Use * 


53,528,306 


7,156,191 6.8 


* The difference between accounted for and unaccounted for water consists of water lost to main 


and service breaks, unrecorded water 


use fighting fires, street sweeping and theft. 


Water Distribution: 






The following new water mains were constructed in 2011: 




In-House Water Main Improvements 


Length 


Size Hydrants 


Thurston Avenue 


260' 


6" 1 


Carter Road 


280' 


8" 


Water Mains Installed bv Private Contractors 




Eames Street 


1,500' 


12" 


Sewer Collection Svstem: 






Sewer: 






The Sewer Department maintains approximately 20 miles of main pipe, 8 pump stations, 1,585 



services and a septage receiving facility. 

During 2011, the department continued to maintain and clean sewer lines as needed. Any 
discovered leaks, blockages or structural deficiencies were corrected as soon as possible. In general, 
the sewer system continues to be in very good condition. 

Although the system is in very good, overall condition, the Sewer Department discovered that there 
was a deteriorated 515 foot section of sewer pipe on the north side of Industrial Way. Approximately 
190 feet of the deteriorated sewer pipe was replaced with PVC pipe while the remaining 325 feet was 
repaired with a CIPPL (Cured in Place Pipe Lining) application. 

There were seven service connections made to the sewer system during 2011. 

-54- 



HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 



Community Starts Here 

In 2011, Wilmington Memorial Library adopted the tagline 
"Community Starts Here" with a corresponding logo that 
communicates the value it provides to residents in a 21 st 
century environment. Although information access is 
everywhere on a wide range of devices, the library provides 
a place for residents to connect: whether attending a 
concert or a movie, participating in a book discussion, 

learning about e-readers, taking a cooking or a computer 
class, playing chess or building with Legos, we strive to 
offer diverse services and events that educate, entertain 
and put residents in touch with what they need in a 
welcoming and friendly environment that defines the 

Wilmington community. This past year illustrates how our new tagline rings true. 




Community Starts Here 
logo and tagline were launched at 
Summer Social 



Wilmington Reads 

In January, the library announced its 5 th "Wilmington Reads," where residents read the same book 
at the same time and then talk with one another about the issues found in a common book. The 
selection for 2011 focused on books written by Michael Pollan. Residents were invited to read one (or 
all) of the following books by Michael Pollan: The Omnivore's Dilemma, In Defense of Food and Food 
Rules. In March, a variety of events were held to discuss and learn more about these complex issues 
and gain an insight into how the foods we buy and eat have a far-reaching impact. Joyce Chaplin, a 
history professor at Harvard University, was the keynote speaker. Her lecture on the history of food 
in America sparked a variety of questions from the audience. Wilmington Reads events that 
followed included: vegetarian cooking, organic vegetable gardening, a history of Wilmington as a 
farming community, bread baking, soda making and a tour of Wilson Farms in Lexington with a 
healthy and delicious lunch at Nourish restaurant. 

Other events were held throughout the year to promote reading. Wilmington residents were invited 
to meet and hear authors William Martin in April and Hank Phillippi Ryan in November. Katie 
Huffman, Adult Services Librarian, led the "Page Turners" book discussions on the third Tuesday of 
the month at the library in the afternoon with an evening book discussion at Starbucks. Eileen 
MacDougall, Library Trustee, and Katie Huffman presented their annual book talk to the Women's 
Club in March. Wilmington's own Frank Kelly came by the library in June to sign copies of Our Mr. 
Kelley: A Lifetime of Coaching and Caring by Rick Cooke. The annual Summer Reading Book 
Brunch in June gave readers a chance to talk with others about what they are reading, get 

recommendations for the summer and learn about the 
details of the summer reading program Novel Destinations. 

Community Fair 

In September, the library hosted its second annual 
Community Fair on the "Swain Green." Over 500 residents 
attended the fair, many of them chatting with 
representatives of 30 non-profit groups to find out about 
services and volunteer opportunities. The Community Fair 
also featured free henna tattoos, face painting, a children's 
craft and storytime and a chance to win an e-reader. Many 
people came by to shop for fresh produce at the Farmers' 
Market or to have their paper files shredded at the Pro 
Shred truck. 




Children's Librarian Barbara Raab, 
Volunteer Gigi Shenloogian and Library 
Page Nicole Iosue at Community Fair 



-55- 



Another fair activity featured a cake decorating contest to celebrate the anniversary of Wilmington's 
incorporation on September 25, 1730. Seventeen cakes depicting various Wilmington themes 
including the Baldwin apple, town buildings and places were entered in the contest in honor of 
Wilmington's 281st birthday. Hundreds of people came by the library to cast their vote for their top 
three cakes. 





Food and Music 

The library hosted three "After Hours" concerts in 2011, offering inexpensive and quality 
entertainment and a chance to get together with friends and neighbors. In March, "Two Old 
Friends," Mac McHale and Emery Hutchins, presented a combination of Irish music and American 
country music. In August, the library presented a "Summer Social" featuring the Dave Rasmussen 
Boiler Room Sextet. Attendees helped the library officially launch its new tagline and logo with a 
photo opportunity of everyone holding the "Community Starts Here" banner. In December, the 
Quintessential Brass delighted the audience with memorable selections from the past and a variety 
of holiday songs. Other music events this year included "Map of the Universe" (Indian influenced 
music) in February and "Strictly Sinatra" with Mel Simons in September. 

In addition to the Wilmington Reads food related programs 
held in March, the library also presented the following 
cooking programs in 2011: "Learn to Make Bread" in 
September, "Pie Making" in November and "Food Gifts for 
the Holidays" in December. A variety of other programs 
presented this past year include yoga and knitting in 
January, a pastel painting workshop and fly casting on 
Silver Lake in September. 

P r 



John Huffman provides instruction on how 
to make bread 




Brandy Danner and Kate Huffman 
Food Gifts for the Holidays 




-56- 



For Kids and Families 



Children's programs continue to offer many opportunities for parents and children to come together 
for education and entertainment. Children were invited to sign up for the annual Summer Reading 
Program "One World, Many Stories." Registration totaled 568 with over 1,800 children attending a 
variety of special events, including the annual "Big Wheels" program featuring town vehicles from 
the Fire Department, Police Department and Public Works Department. Children also came to the 
library to enter the "Lucky Reader of the Week" drawing, guess the number of marbles in the jar, 
participate in weekly drop-in crafts and check out books to read for the fun of it! 



The traditional storytime introduces young children to 
the library and to reading. This year storytime offerings 
were expanded in order to giving working parents a 
chance to experience storytime with their children. In 
September, drop-in storytime was added on periodic 
Saturday mornings and in December a PJ storytime was 
added on periodic Monday evenings. In addition, 
storytime for two year olds is now offered weekly instead 
of bi-weekly. "Family Movie Nights" showing newly 
released feature films were added to the offerings on 
periodic Friday evenings to encourage families to visit 
the library together. Lego building at the library 
continued to draw a crowd of children, proving that 

building together could be more fun than building alone at home. Other popular special children's 
events this year included "Eyes on Owls," "Bread Making," "Little Groove Band," "Sky Pirate Show" 
and "Australian Animals." 




Participants display their storytime tees. 



We celebrated National Poetry Month in April with our annual Poetry Contest. The 2011 theme 
"baseball" inspired over 230 poems from poets of all ages. The winners were invited to the library to 
read their winning poems and receive prizes and certificates. 




An open house celebration was held on June 2 nd to honor 
Children's Librarian Susan MacDonald who retired with 
41 years of service at the library. Library patrons, former 
colleagues and town officials came by throughout the day 
to thank her and extend their good wishes. In a brief 
ceremony, Town Manager Michael Caira presented Susan 
with a glass Baldwin apple given to Town employees upon 
retirement. Friends of the Library presented an Eric 
Carle lithograph for the Children's Room in Susan's honor. 
In July, Barbara Raab joined the staff as the new 
Children's Librarian. 



A Place for Teens 



For many teens, the library provides a comfortable 
place for doing homework, finding information and 
gathering with friends. The small teen space in the 
library is crowded after school with teens on computers 
and working at tables. The library hosts events 
throughout the year where teens enjoy doing things 
together including video gaming, movie nights and craft 
and cooking programs. In May, the Massachusetts 
Department of Employment presented job hunting for 
teens. In the summer, teens enjoyed learning how to 
make freezerless ice cream, creating origami and getting 
free henna tattoos. The 2011 summer reading program 
"You Are Here" garnered 453 online book reviews from 




Teens complete homework at the Library. 



-57- 



45 teens. In September, 35 teens participated in a virtual author visit with James Preller. The fall 
was a time to focus on college planning with events on how to write the college admission essay and 
college financial planning advice. Brandy Danner, Teen Services Librarian, presented book talks to 
approximately 375 teens in 21 classes in October at the Wilmington High School and 350 teens in an 
assembly at the Wilmington Middle School. A number of teens visited the library to check out some 
of the titles presented. The year ended with the annual "All You Can Read Buffet." 




Enhancing Service through Technology 

Library staff helped residents understand the various e- 
readers and tablets on the market with an "E-Reader 
Petting Zoo" held in December. Many patrons took 
advantage of the opportunity to borrow one of the e- 
readers available, giving them a chance to test drive one 
before making a purchase. Introductory classes on 
Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel taught by 
Technology Librarian Curtis Wyant were quickly filled 
and often had a waiting list. These classes were made 
possible with new laptops purchased by the Friends of 



the Library with the generous 2010 annual appeal 
After School in the Teen Zone. donations. Volunteers also taught one-on-one basic 

computer classes throughout the year. 



Thanks to the work of Technology Librarian Curtis Wyant, the library launched its new website in 
October, giving the community user-friendly virtual access to library services. The website is built 
on Drupal, an open source content management system. This software provides features such as 
RSS feeds that patrons can subscribe to for news and event updates. Patrons can also comment on 
blog posts and events, allowing for easy virtual communication between the library and its users. 

The library offers patrons a variety of subscription databases and on-line services that includes 
access to newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, technical books, foreign language tutorials, audio 
books, e-books, etc. In July, a downloadable music service became available to library patrons. 
"Freegal" provides access to nearly 500,000 songs from Sony's music catalog and is continually 
updated with new material. With their library card, patrons can download and keep three songs per 
week. 




Wilmington Memorial Library, along with 34 other libraries 
from the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium (MVLC), 
launched a new catalog and circulation system over Memorial 
Day weekend. The new catalog is part of a move to the. 
Evergreen, an open source library system. Although the 
implementation of the new system had some problems to be 
resolved, the expectation going forward is that Evergreen will 
provide users with more search options and a user friendly 
interface on the public catalog and in their patron account. 
We appreciate the public's patience with the bumps in the 
transition to the new system. Kudos to the library staff for 



Wilmington Reads tour Wilson Farms its P ositive attitude in learning the ins and outs of Evergreen. 
in Lexington 

Technology will also help improve access to Wilmington's history. The publisher of the Town Crier 
signed a license agreement in November, giving the library permission to digitize the Town Crier 
archives back to the mid 1950's. Once this project is completed, the Town Crier archives will be 
available on the library's website. Digitization will make keyword searching possible and local 
history more accessible. This project is funded with a generous $10,000 donation from the 
Wilmington Rotary Club, the support of the Friends of the Library and state aid money. 



-58- 



Always Someone to Help You 



Library patrons continue to give thumbs up on the quality of the customer service they receive. Here 
are a few of the comments received in our survey during National Library Week in April: 

• Always someone to help you. Look forward to going there and always greeted by a happy face. 
Doreen Abruzzio 

• All the staff here are very helpful, friendly and go out of their way to assist in many areas of 
the library. Steven Nason 

• It's my favorite place in Wilmington! I love the sense of community and friendliness of the 
staff. Corrine Castrini 

In November, Jenny Arch joined the staff as the new part-time Adult Services Librarian, replacing 
Laurie Lucey who submitted her resignation after the birth of her second child. Laurie had worked 
at the library since 2003. 



Stay Awhile 



Our building continues to provide a valuable physical infrastructure in the community. Since the 
loss of the proposal for a new library in 2005, we have been trying to make space for people who come 
to the library to "stay awhile." Residents want a library that offers them a quiet place to read and 
reflect and a place that they can meet in small or large groups. Meeting this need continues to be 
challenging in a building with less than 15,000 square feet. In January, the Public Buildings 
Department took down the walls of the local history room on the first floor in order to open up more 
space for tables and chairs in the quiet reading area. Outlets were added to accommodate more 
laptop users in this area. After Tropical Storm Irene, many residents who lost their electricity came 
to the library to use the library's computers, Wi-Fi or just to relax and read for awhile in a warm and 
comfortable place. 





Community Support and Collaboration 

In 2011, the Friends of the Library gave over $27,000 for 
programs, museum passes, furnishings and equipment 
and staff training. We would also like to acknowledge the 
following organizations for museum pass support: 
Wilmington Sons of Italy, Wilmington Community Fund, 
Women of Wilmington and Wilmington Arts Council. 
Special thanks to the Wilmington Rotary Club for its 
$10,000 donation for the Town Crier digitization project. 
Thanks to the Friends of the Library and the Wilmington 
Education Foundation for funding for Wilmington Reads. 



Yoga Class at the Library. 



The library participated in the Wildcat Community 
Service Program, providing volunteer opportunities for 
many high school students needing to earn community service volunteer hours for graduation. 
These students were invaluable in helping the library complete its rebarcoding project. Duplicating 
barcodes and moving them to the front cover on all library items will make it easier for patrons using 
self check stations and for moving thousands of interlibrary loan items between libraries. 



During the month of December, the library helped out the Food Pantry with "Food for Fines." 
Hundreds of bags of food were donated during the month by many who owed no fines at all. 

Some of the community organizations that took advantage of the library's meeting rooms include the 
Wilmington High School 4.0 Committee, Wilmington Recreation Department, English Conversation 
Group, Farmers' Market, Wildwood School PAC, Democratic Town Committee, Republican Town 
Committee, Women's Club, Women of Wilmington and Representative Miceli who uses the library to 
meet with constituents. The library's new website now enables users to see meeting room 
availability, making it easier for booking. 



-59- 



Marketing and Promotion 



In May, the Massachusetts Library Association (MLA) presented a second place award for the 
Wilmington Reads brochure designed by Katie Huffman, Adult Services Librarian. The Friends of 
the Library purchased "Storytime" t-shirts for the children who attended the spring storytime 
session. We asked parents to have their children wear these t-shirts and share the storytime 
experience with other parents. The library's marketing and communication materials now have a 
defined color scheme and style that uniquely identifies the library with its logo and tagline. At the 
end of the year, we published our first quarterly winter events brochure. This brochure is being 
placed in businesses around town to make sure all residents are informed about what their public 
library has to offer. 

Looking Forward 

We look forward to new opportunities to be innovative and responsive to emerging trends, keeping 
Wilmington Memorial Library relevant and valued by the Wilmington residents. This commitment 
is expressed in our vision statement: 

The Wilmington Memorial Library responds to the changing needs of the community, providing 
valued services and experiences in an inviting facility and connecting residents to their community 
and the world beyond. 




-60- 



LIBRARY STAFF 



Administration: 

Christina A. Stewart, Library Director 
Charlotte Wood, Assistant Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, Administrative Assistant 



Adult Services: 

Katie Huffman, Reference and Adult Service Librarian 
Linda Pavluk, Circulation Librarian 
Ruth Ellen Donnelly, Adult Circulation Assistant 
Jenny Arch, Part-Time Adult Services Librarian 
Part-Time Library Assistants 
Carol MacDougall, Desiree Maguire, Maureen Walsh 

Part-Time Library Pages 
Kaitlin Kinsella, Jonathan O'Brien, 
Samantha O'Leary, Nary Poll 

Technical Services: 

Curtis Wyant, Technology Librarian 
Linda Harris, Assistant Technical Services Librarian 
Diane DeFrancesco, Technical Services Assistant 

Youth Services: 

Barbara Raab, Children's Librarian 
Barbara Michaud, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, Children's Circulation Assistant 

Brandy Danner, Teen Services Librarian 
Barbara Bresnahan, Part-Time Library Assistant 

Part-Time Library Pages 
Michelle Barnes, Amanda Bonnette-Kim, 
Carrie Cushing, Nicole Iosue, Sarah Johansson 



-61- 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 2011 



Hours Open Weekly 
Winter 

Monday through Saturday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 
Summer 

Monday through Friday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 

Number New Patrons Registered 

Total Registered Borrowers 

Number of library visits 

Number of Items in Collection 
Items per capita 

Subscriptions 

Museum Passes 

Circulation 
Circulation per capita 

Interlibrary Loan 

To other libraries 
From other libraries 



26,341 
33,881 



Requests Placed 

Information Services 

Information Desk Transactions 
Internet Sessions 
Email Newsletter Subscriptions 
Website Visits 

Conference Room 
Library 
Community 

Library Programs 

Children's Programs 
Teen Programs 
Adult Programs 

Total attendance at programs 
Children's Programs 
Teen Programs 
Adult Programs 



483 
268 



240 
48 
93 



6,780 
456 
2,144 



64 
56 

22,443 

1,010 

13,538 

140,618 

58,838 
2.64 

153 

11 

264,745 
11.8 

60,222 
48,652 



10,922 
22,137 
1,992 
174,804 

751 



381 



9,380 



-62- 



Wilmington Arts Council 



The Wilmington Arts Council is a dual organization giving out monies available from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council and running the Wilmington Arts Center. We are the only Arts 
Council in Massachusetts which has the use of a public building and the Council is very grateful for 
that fact. Over the years the arts lottery monies have decreased and our figure for next year's 
allotment is $3,870. The decision for who gets these awards were made in November of 2011. 

We generally receive over 20 requests for monies to support individuals working in the arts, schools 
looking for enrichment programs, musicians looking to play at different venues, libraries for museum 
passes, actors and dancers for places to perform and singers for nursing homes. These are the things 
we consider when deciding who gets these requests fulfilled. The Council spreads the monies around 
to students and children, senior citizens, the Wilmington Library, the Recreation Department and 
art and music lovers. This year, and every year, the Council paid for two passes for the Museum of 
Fine Arts and the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum available at the library. We are paying for two 
singers at the two Wilmington nursing homes and a play about W.C. Fields and Mae West at the 
Buzzell Senior Center. A dance class will be held at the Art Center. At the Wilmington Memorial 
Library Ruth Harcovitz will sing and Maichack Pastels will teach. The students from Shawsheen 
Valley Regional Technical High School visited the De Cordova Museum. Every year programs like 
these are investigated, selected and paid for by the Wilmington Arts Council. We hope the public 
will be looking forward to these programs. 

We have been fortunate in 2011 to obtain a new artist to teach at the Arts Center. Fran Nola is a 
well known artist from North Reading. She has won many awards for her work in watercolor and 
acrylics. She is a member of the Reading Art Association and the North Shore Art Association (a 
group you must be juried into). Her class in Wilmington is called "Making Art." The use of 
watercolor, acrylics, pastels and pencil are all encouraged. Drawing, the basis of all art, is 
emphasized. Also teaching at the Arts Center are Louise Anderson and Susan O'Briant. Louise has 
been teaching watercolor at the Arts Center for over 20 years. Susan teaches oil painting, a very 
popular class. All our teachers are award-winning artists and very active in the local art scene. 

The Wilmington Arts Center got lots of use in 2011. Our usual groups continue to rehearse at the 
center. The Merrimack Valley Chorus and the Stuart Highlanders Pipe Band continue to support 
the Arts Center and to watch out for our building. The local nursery school has their holiday party 
here in December, quilters quilt and the piano rings out with many recitals which are well attended 
by parents and grandparents. Our 31 st Annual Art Show was a huge success this year. Every year 
we are told that our show gets better and better. 

The Arts Council is very excited about a new art show coming to the Arts Center in the spring of 
2012. The Wilmington High School art teachers will be arranging an art show of student work at the 
Arts Center with the Council's help. We are hoping this will be the beginning of a relationship with 
the high school to supply a needed resource to show student art work in Wilmington. We are also 
working with a Wilmington singer who is interested in teaching voice and helping people to sing in 
public. The Wilmington Arts Council is working hard to maintain our programs and building, to 
support the local cultural activity, to reach out and to go forth with new ideas. 

Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Sarah Davis Jaquith was born in Wilmington in 1832 and was married to Cyrus Lewis Carter in 
1874. Before her death in 1907, she made a provision in her will stating "I give and bequeath to the 
Town of Wilmington the sum of six thousand dollars in trust to invest the principle sum and to 
expend the income in maintaining courses of lectures for the benefit of the people of Wilmington." 

For over 100 years, the Sarah D. J. Carter Committee has honored her wishes by presenting 
interesting and entertaining programs to the Town of Wilmington. These programs have always 
been free of charge. 



-63- 



This year the Committee was excited to have "The Singing Trooper", Dan Clark. We were fortunate 
that Dan, who travels the region and nation with his unique style of entertainment, could work 
Wilmington into his busy schedule. Dan appeared on stage at the Wilmington Middle School on 
October 28. Over 200 residents thoroughly enjoyed his show which was filled with numerous stories 
of his career between patriotic music, Broadway hits, Irish ballads and popular tunes. 

The Committee is hard at work planning our next program to be held in the fall of 2012. 





Left to Right: Julia Doten, Ann Berghaus, Adele Passmore, 
Dan Clark, Andrea Houser and Ann St. Onge 



Historical Commission 









m si 

■ i w 


w 






I mm | 

I#i 





The Wilmington Historical Commission continues 
to educate our citizens of Wilmington's rich history 
and strive to preserve and conserve our Town's 
historical buildings and sites. 

Rehabilitation work continues at the Butters • 
Farmhouse. The Massachusetts Historical 
Commission awarded an $8,000 matching grant to 
the Town which will be put toward the completion 
of work on the exterior of the house. 




Butters Farmhouse 



Work continues on our historic Town Pound which 
was relocated in 2009 to Middlesex Avenue. This 
year, a white cedar gate was added to the Pound 
through the efforts of Wilmington resident, Marion 
Bradford in memory of her husband. The project is 
expected to be completed in the spring of 2012. 



The Hudson-Roman House on Church Street built in 1898 is one of Wilmington's finest examples of 
the Queen Anne style of architecture. Members of the Historical Commission attended the new high 
school public forums to advocate for the retention of the Roman House, which is on the parcel of land 
on which the new high school will be built. The Commission would like this historic house to remain 
on its original location for generations to come. 



-64- 



At the close of 2010, the Trustee of the Richardson Estate on Woburn Street removed Wilmington as 
the beneficiary of the Estate. This property, which Ms. Winifred Richardson had envisioned to be 
used for agriculture, education and passive recreation is now the property of Historic New England 
and will be sold with historic deed restrictions. Historic New England did allow us to have many 
items having Wilmington significance which were in the house and barns. These items are on 
display at the Wilmington Town Museum at the Harnden Tavern. 

In October, the Historical Commission co-sponsored a lecture at the Library called "The Gravestone 
Girls." This lecture on cemetery art, history and symbolism highlighted many of the stones and 
monuments found in Wilmington's cemeteries. 

The annual Veterans' Day exhibit sponsored by the Wilmington Historical Commission was held in 
the Fourth of July building. This display of military photos and artifacts from the Town Museum 
collection was arranged by our Museum Curator. The Commission wishes to thank private citizens 
for their contribution to this display. 




The Wilmington Historical Commission continues to 
encourage and support our educational outreach 
programs. This involves a partnership with the 
teachers at all levels at the elementary, middle and 
high schools. Scheduled tours are always available at 
the Town Museum. We continue to work with youth 
organizations such as Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts to 
help them meet their community requirements. 



Marsha Agostino speaks to 
Kindergarten students. 



The Historical Commission is proud to be a sponsor of 

many young men striving to become Eagle Scouts. This 

year Christopher Monteforte of Troop 56, under the 

direction of Museum Curator Terry McDermott, rebuilt 
1 1 o i ii , . , tt , rr i "i, ,i Adele Passmore speaks to 

the tront walkway at the Harnden lavern, rebuilt the r 

stone wall next to the garage, stained the Carriage Kindergarten students. 

House stairs going up the hill and rehabilitated a back 

garden. A reception thanking Chris for his work was held at the Tavern in November. 




During the holiday season, the Commission donated a historical-themed basket to the Women of 
Wilmington's "Festival of Trees" fundraiser. The Commission also decorated the Harnden Tavern, 
Scalekeepers' Office, Center Village Historic District sign at the Town Common, West Schoolhouse 
and Butters Farmhouse with Christmas greens. 

Memberships in the American Association for State and Local History, New England Museum 
Association, Historic New England, National Trust Forum, American Association of Museums, 
Preservation MASS and the Woburn Historical Society were renewed. 

The Historical Commission continues to oversee the activities at the Wilmington Town Museum at 
the Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern. We work closely with, and support the efforts of, Museum Curator 
Terry McDermott. 



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The Historical Commission thanks the Friends of Harnden Tavern for their hard work and support. 
Their annual Christmas Social continues to be a very enjoyable event. We thank the Wilmington 
Garden Club for their help with the Tavern gardens and Christmas Social. We also thank the 
Wilmington Minutemen for their support in the activities held at the Harnden Tavern. 

A special thank you to the town administration for all their support in the Historical Commission's 
endeavors. In addition, we wish to thank the Public Works Department for keeping the Tavern 
grounds looking beautiful and the Public Buildings Department for their help; especially for the 
Tavern's new front steps. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission meets on the second Monday of the month. 

Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern and Wilmington Town Mnseuni 

To "preserve and present... our community's history," is the mission of the Wilmington Town 
Museum at the Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern. With the constant support and encouragement of the 
Wilmington Historical Commission, the Town Museum has brought to its citizens the following 
programs, exhibits and events in the past year: 

February - Be My Valentine! A Valentine's Day Exhibit 

An exhibit of old time Valentines featuring a craft table to allow children to make 
Valentines of their own. 

March - Wilmington As A Farming Community 

This event was held in conjunction with Wilmington Memorial Library's "Wilmington 
Reads Michael Pollan" program. Participants met at the Museum for a presentation 
focusing on Wilmington's history as a farming community. The event included a 
brief lecture, photos of Wilmington's agricultural past, reminiscences from people 
who remembered Wilmington's farms and farming life and a discussion of how 
changes in our community reflect Michael Pollan's thoughts about where we get our 
food today. 

April - Kindergarten comes to the Town Museum! 

Students from the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers visited the 
Museum for a day of touring, crafts and games. 

June Summer Fun Preview 

A Sunday afternoon of games on the grounds of the Harnden Tavern, this was a 
preview of activities available on "Lunch and Games" days during the summer 
season. 

Flag Day 

The Museum and Carriage House were open for tours on an evening when the 
Wilmington Company of Minutemen conducted their annual Flag Retirement 
Ceremony. 

July & Brown Bag Lunch and Games 

August - A fun way to spend a summer afternoon! Visitors were encouraged to bring a bag 

lunch to eat in the backyard of the Museum overlooking the Wilmington Garden 
Club's herb garden and to play old fashioned outdoor games. 

Wilmington Farmers Market 

On the Road - Across from Wilmington's Town Common 

The Museum was fortunate to be able to participate in the Town's new Farmers' 
Market, presenting a history table at the market in July and sitting at the 
Community Table in August. The Farmers' Market was a great experience and a 
huge hit with Wilmington residents. 



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November - A Reception for Eagle Scout Christopher Monteforte and Boy Scout Troop 56 
A reception and plaque unveiling to celebrate the completion of Christopher 
Monteforte's Eagle Scout project to rebuild the walkway and a stone wall on the 
property of the Museum, to replant a perennial garden and complete other 
landscaping tasks. 

November- Veterans' Day Exhibit 

On the Road - At Wilmington's Fourth of July Building 
The Museum was proud to present the fourth annual exhibit of veteran's 
memorabilia at the 4 th of July Building following the Veterans' Day Ceremony on the 
Town Common. 



December - Annual Holiday Social 

The Harnden Tavern's annual Holiday Social is a longstanding tradition and a 
wonderful way to kick off the holiday season! Members of the Friends of Harnden 
Tavern and the Wilmington Garden Club made the Museum a festive place with 
holiday greenery, floral arrangements, lighting and holiday refreshments. This 
year's entertainment was provided by Brownie Girl Scout Troop 62002 while 
students from Wilmington High School assisted at the children's craft table. 



In 2011, the grounds of the Museum were greatly improved by the Eagle Scout project of Christopher 
Monteforte and Wilmington Boy Scout Troop 56. As part of the project, the front walkway leading 
into the Harnden Tavern building was completely rebuilt, as was a failing stone wall by the back 
outbuilding. Also, an overgrown perennial garden was rehabilitated, the outdoor wooden stairs were 
stained and a few areas were enhanced with stone. This work made a real difference to the Museum 
complex, with the improved brick walkway providing a more inviting entrance to the building, 
among many other benefits of the project. We are very grateful that the Museum was chosen to be 
the recipient of Christopher's Eagle Scout project. 

Other Scout troops have been friends to the Museum as 
well. Brownie Girl Scout Troop 62002, under the 
direction of leaders Lisa Ward and Debbie Consorti, not 
only provided entertainment at this year's Holiday 
Social by singing Christmas carols for the assembled 
guests, but they did so in period costume made by the 
group leaders. Many other Boy and Girl Scout troops, 
Cub Scouts and Brownies visited throughout the year 
and enthusiastically toured the Museum. 

As always, the Museum received donations this year 
from many sources. Some of our donors this year 
included: Charlie Ballou, Polly Smith, Jim Durkee, 
Jane Hill, Marguerite Little, Christine Nelson, Bob 
Peterson, Paul Curtin, Lou Cimaglia, the Seabees, 
Wendy Proodian and Dora Ardolino. In addition, 
Historic New England made a large donation to the 
Museum of furniture and artifacts from the Winifred 
Richardson estate. We thank all who have contributed 
items to the Museum. It is through their generosity 
that we are able to continue to acquire objects that help 
us tell the story of our community. 

The contributions of volunteers to the Museum are 
invaluable. Adele Passmore continues to be the creative 
mind behind many of the Museum's exhibits. Steve 
Berghaus maintains and enhances the Carriage House 
on an ongoing basis. Cassie Hurley has begun 




A Princeton Elm is planted at the Harnden 
Tavern by Zachary Perdicaro, Zachary 
Dancewicz and Aaron Dancewicz 



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organizing some of the Museum's paperwork and lent a hand preparing for, and working at, several 
Museum related events. John Olson, a local carpenter, reinforced one of our picnic tables when he 
saw that it was wobbly. The assistance of Wilmington High School students greatly enhanced many 
of our programs. Marsha Agostino, Christina Lucciano, Adele Passmore, Grace Carroll and members 
of the Wilmington Historical Commission assisted with activities when Wilmington Kindergarten 
students made a field trip to the Museum. Members of the Friends of Harnden Tavern once again 
presented a Holiday Social that was greatly enjoyed by all who attended. 

The Museum works closely with 
many other town departments, 
either to maintain the Museum 
building or to create and 
promote the Museum's 
programs throughout the 
community. This year, the 
Public Buildings Department, in 
addition to their usual support 
of the Museum, installed new 
steps at the front of the 
building. Grace Carroll and 
Adele Passmore worked at the 
Museum through the Senior 
Citizen Tax Work-Off Program. 
The Museum worked with the 
Wilmington Memorial Library 
this year on several events, 
Brownie Troop 62002 and friends at the Holiday Social. including participation in the 

Library's "Wilmington Reads" 
Program, with an event at the 
Museum in March; the Museum also co-sponsored the Graveyard Girls program at the library in 
October and participated in the Library's Community Fair event in September. The Museum also 
worked with the School Department for the Kindergarten Field Trip to the Museum in April, the 
Town tour of historic sites for new teachers in August and provided high school students with 
volunteer opportunities. The Museum is privileged to work with the Veterans' Agent on the 
Veterans' Day Exhibit and has also had occasion to work with the Recreation Department and the 
Department of Public Works. Grateful for the support of these departments and the Town 
Manager's Office, the Museum looks forward to working with the Historical Commission in 
presenting another year of programs that entertain and educate the community. 

The Town Museum continues to serve the community, onsite and at other locations around town (i.e. 
the library, the 4 th of July Building.) Over 900 people of all ages visited the Town Museum in the 
past year. 

Winter Hours Tuesday & Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

First Sunday of month, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Functions Wilmington Garden Club 

Holiday Parties 

Community Use 

Historical Commission Monthly meetings 




Friends of Harnden Tavern 



Boy and Girl Scout Troops 



Bi-Monthly meetings 
December — Holiday Social 

Site Tours 



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Public Schools 



Students' Historical Research 
Kindergarten Field Trip 



Senior Center 

Wilmington Company of Minutemen 
Wilmington Garden Club 
Museum Programs 



Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program 
Meetings 



Children's Programs 



Valentine Crafts 

Kindergarten Comes to the Town Museum! 
Summer Fun Preview 

"Brown Bag Lunch & Games" summer program 
Scout Troop tours 



Adult Programs 



Be My Valentine! A Valentine's Day Exhibit 
Wilmington as a Farming Community 
Veterans' Day Exhibit 



Family Programs Flag Day Activities 

"Brown Bag Lunch & Games" summer program 
Friends' Holiday Social 




The Recreation Department's continuing goal is to offer high quality, relevant programs and services 
to the residents of Wilmington. The Recreation Department aims to provide solutions to new 
challenges faced by residents in evolving life situations. New residents can meet others, parents can 
find a wide variety of reasonably priced programs for their children to sample, "empty nesters" might 
take a class or enjoy theater or sporting event tickets and residents of all ages continue to reap the 
benefits of group travel and assorted fitness programs. The Recreation Department has been in full- 
time operation for 41 years. The Department is located in Room 8 at Town Hall. Office hours are 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The Recreation Commission, formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy making capacity. 
Volunteer members are: C. Michael Burns, Chairman; Sheila M. Burke, Vice-Chairman; Charles 
Biondo, Mark Kennedy and Laurie Robarge. Commissioners are active in various groups, 
committees and clubs throughout town. 




The Recreation Office staff remains small, with only 
two full-time employees (Director Deborah Cipriani 
and Senior Clerk Linda Kanter) and one part-time 
staff (Program Coordinator Karen Campbell). In 
addition, there are over 120 part-time and seasonal 
employees and over 250 volunteers who help to run 
the department's programs. The department offers, 
on a year-round basis, an ever-changing slate of 
activities for residents of all ages. While the office is 
open Monday through Friday, recreation programs 
are scheduled virtually every day of the week and 
into the evening hours. 



Hoping to catch the Big One. 



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A primary objective of the Recreation Department is to offer a wide variety of quality programs that 
are as affordable as possible. Registration fees remain low, especially in comparison to other towns 
or organizations. The department is funded by a variety of sources. The town appropriated budget 
provides for a full-time director and clerk as well as some limited supplies and staff training costs. 
Program fees fund the position of the program coordinator. A combination of program fees and 
donations heavily supplement the town-funded budget. We strive to keep fees and costs low by 
utilizing cost-saving methods including the bid process, fund-raising and in-kind services. We 
continue to search for innovative ways to generate funds to offset costs for the recreation consumer. 

Volunteers are critical to the success of Recreation programs. Volunteers might find themselves 
spreading out candy for the Annual Easter Egg Hunt, coaching a T-Ball or Basketball team or 
serving breakfast to Santa, resident children and their families. We greatly appreciate our residents 
who give so generously of their time and most report that they also gain on personal levels by 
volunteering. We receive generous donations from local businesses and organizations. Some of these 
valuable contributors include: Century 21 (Starwood), CVS of Wilmington, Danversbank (Peoples 
United), Dunkin' Donuts of 321 Main St., Dunkin' Donuts of 195 Main St., Everett Lodge IOOF (Odd 
Fellows), Kiwanis, Lowell 50 Savings Bank, Lucci's, Market Basket, Mass. Fisheries and Wildlife, 
Reading Co-operative Bank, ReMax Encore Real Estate, Representative James Miceli, Reading 
Recreation Department, Shriners, Sons of Italy, Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks, Walgreens, 
Wilmington Arts Council, Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, Wilmington Community Fund, 
Wilmington Fire Department, Wilmington 4 th of July Committee, Wilmington Police Department 
and the Wonder Years Learning Center. 

The Recreation Department continues to improve and augment our program offerings to meet the 
ever-increasing demands for classes, activities, entertainment and travel experiences. We actively 
solicit suggestions for future offerings and encourage our talented residents to consider teaching a 
class. The department strives to meet the increased demand for children's programs by expanding 
the scope and number of these programs. Our holiday and seasonal celebrations enhance the sense 
of community and identify Wilmington as a unique town. They include the Easter Egg Hunt, 
Fishing Derby, Concerts on the Common, Horribles Parade, Santa's Workshop and our own 
Breakfast with Santa. 

A mainstay of the Recreation Department is our sports leagues and programs. We consistently 
register hundreds of children each year for Jr. and Recreation Basketball Leagues. In an attempt to 
maximize the quality of our basketball leagues, we offer both referee and coach clinics. This year we 
added additional supervised basketball programs for older children to play "pick-up" in a setting less 
structured than a league. Other recurring and tremendously popular programs include: "The 
Rookies" T-Ball, Kinder Soccer, Volleyball and 35+ Basketball. Recognizing the benefits of physical 
activity, we have introduced new offerings this year that promote health and wellness including 
Round Robin Tennis, Basketball Warm-ups and a 5K Training Program. 



Summer is extremely busy for the department as we offer a 
multitude of programs for families and residents. The Playground 
and Tiny Tots programs offer summertime recreation and 
socialization for Wilmington children. Other offerings include an 
opportunity to try something there is no time for during the school 
year. Some examples from this past summer include two basketball 
leagues that play outdoors under the lights in the evening, art 
classes, sailing and kayaking lessons on the Charles River in Boston, 
golf and tennis lessons and several sports clinics. We offered a 
variety of trips in the summer including a day trip to explore the 
lighthouses of Rhode Island and another entitled "Plymouth Rocks 
with Wine!" in which participants enjoyed a cruise on Plymouth 
Harbor, lunch and a visit to a winery. In addition, the Recreation 
Department is responsible for the oversight of the Silver Lake 
beaches. 

New lifeguard chair ready for 
sun-filled season 




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Chairs receive a new look thanks to the upholstery workshop. 

We continue to offer movie and event tickets at reduced rates and we are also able to secure tickets 
to "difficult to come by" events such as the Red Sox, Lowell Spinners, Bruins, Celtics and Disney on 
Ice productions. We offer tickets to local theater productions for shows ranging from "The Holiday 
Pops with Keith Lockhart" at the Lowell Auditorium to "Mary Poppins" at the Opera House, 
"Grease" at the Wang Theatre and "Norman, Is That You?" at the Newport Playhouse. Many 
residents turn to our quarterly flyer when making decisions for their entertainment options. We 
offer great gift possibilities including discounted movie tickets and gift certificates that may be 
redeemed for any of our programs or trips. Increasing numbers of residents are choosing to give the 
gift of travel and recreation programs, providing enhanced life experiences for their family and 
friends. 

Our trips continue to grow in popularity as residents enjoy round trip transportation to and from 
Wilmington, reasonable prices and the ease of having a pre-planned itinerary. Perennial favorite 
day trips include New York City in May, October and December and monthly trips to Foxwoods 
Casino. New trips that were thoroughly enjoyed included a "Tribute to Patsy Cline", a "Taste of 
Providence" and "White Christmas with Bing Crosby and Bob Hope". During the summer the 
children enrolled in the Playground and Tiny Tots programs could participate in many age 
appropriate field trip excursions. We offer frequent theatre trips so that residents can easily 
purchase tickets to current offerings in Boston that include bus transportation, thus avoiding both 
parking and traffic hassles. In 2011 our overnight trips included: a Greek Isles Cruise in May, a 
Casino Escape to the Connecticut Casinos, a St. Patrick's Celebration at the Beacon Resort in New 
Hampshire, a trip to the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, a Yellowstone and Grand Teton National 
Park Tour, a Red Sox Road Trip to Pittsburgh, a Patriots Road Trip to Buffalo, a weekend in 
Montreal and a trip to Atlantic City. 

In an attempt to be as accommodating as possible, most Recreation programs can be registered for 
by mail or by drop-off in the Town Hall night slot. Our newsletter and many required registration 
forms are available on-line through the Town website, by accessing Recreation, followed by the link 
for "Recreation Matters". Our newsletters are also available in Town Hall, the Wilmington 
Memorial Library and the Buzzell Senior Center. We hold special registrations outside of regular 
office hours for our most popular programs (Tiny Tots and Red Sox Ticket Sales). One of the most 
common requirements of the Recreation staff is to act as an information source. We answer a wide 
variety and large number of questions daily about local and regional services. 



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Wilmington is a suburban community, considered a "well located town", with easy access to major 
roads, parks and beaches, sporting events, theatre, arts and museums. Today's recreation consumer 
is searching for opportunities to access all of these area attractions, as well as local activities. The 
Recreation Department allows people to choose a new sport or science club, learn a new skill, 
socialize with fellow residents and enjoy recreation at a convenient location and at a reasonable 
price. These dynamics stress the importance of town support for the Recreation Department. The 
positive feedback and generous donations we receive are evidence of the appreciation of local 
residents and businesses for the Recreation Department. We are an ever-changing environment and 
a solution to the continual changing needs of our residents. The Recreation Department's ability to 
adapt and our commitment to provide quality service is a trademark that we stand by. 



The Department of Elderly Services is essential in the Town of Wilmington because one in five 
Massachusetts residents are now aged 60 or over and 14 percent are aged 65 or over. One-quarter of 
all households in Massachusetts include at least one person aged 65 and over. Eleven percent of all 
Massachusetts households are now composed of a person aged 65 and over living alone. The Town of 
Wilmington currently has 4,045 residents over the age of 60, a 29 percent increase since the year 
2000. Therefore, it is imperative that the Wilmington Department of Elderly Services continue to be 
committed in providing resources and services to its elderly residents. 

At this time we are facing a very unstable economy as stated in Maturing of America, "Due to the 
severe economic changes stemming from the Great Recession; communities have generally only 
managed to "hold the line" maintaining existing policies, programs and services to meet needs of an 
aging population." This is not true for the Town of Wilmington, the Department of Elderly Services 
is extremely fortunate to be able to not only maintain our current programming, but also provide 
new and innovative programs and services. 

The Department of Elderly Services offer several programs and services which include keeping 
seniors healthy, active and involved within their community. The Department strives to make 
certain elders have access to an integrated selection of health and social support programs; support 
families in their efforts to care for loved ones at home and in the community; and maintain services 
that ensure that older residents are protected from personal exploitation, neglect and abuse. The 
Department is extremely fortunate to have a full-time Case Manager, Laura Pickett, who provides 
the following services, but not limited to: conducting home visits, family consults and providing 
referrals to outside agencies, thereby strengthening this one-on-one connection between the elder 
and staff throughout the community. 

The Department is also fortunate by having its own Buzzell Senior Center located on 15 School 
Street. There are approximately 60 to 80 elders who visit daily to participate in programs. The 
center has a unique opportunity to provide reliable information and activities to help elders manage 
and improve their health. It all happens in a non-threatening, non-medical environment with lots of 
peer support. We made evidence-based healthy aging programs part of our on-going wellness 
efforts. Through a free program offered by Lahey Clinic Community Benefits Program, we were able 
to offer an eight week Chronic Disease Self-Management Program and six week Diabetes Self 
Management Program. By offering these evidence-based programs, the Senior Center has made a 
real impact on elders' health by teaching them to eat better, exercise more, reduce pain and manage 
chronic disease. 

In 2011, the Department was very privileged to be the recipient, for the seventh year, of the Lahey 
Clinic Community Benefits Grant that further complimented the evidence-based programs. We 
received $13,500.00, which was able to provide weekly Country Line Dancing; bi-weekly Aerobics 
Class by a Certified Aerobics Instructor, "SBF" (Strength, Balance and Flexibility) also by a Certified 
Aerobics Instructor, Yoga Class by a certified Yoga Instructor and Brain Yoga, training your mind 
and body to work together. As a result of this grant, all of these programs have incurred a large 
increase in attendance. There is an exercise program offered daily that compliments an array of 
elder's abilities and needs. Elders have stated how it has helped lower their blood pressure, increase 
their ability to walk longer distances and as one elder happily stated "I can now do all of Market 
Basket shopping without having to stop and catch my breath." 




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Other programs offered at the center are ceramic classes, nutrition classes, computer classes, arts & 
crafts, quilting group, walking group in collaboration with Harold Parker State Park, cooking 
classes, cribbage, pool and Bocce. Over 80 percent of these classes are led by volunteers who are 
dedicated individuals who graciously offer their time and energy. 

The Department is fortunate to continue to receive grant funding from the Executive Office of Elder 
Affairs ($21,952.00) which supports a part-time (20 hours a week) Outreach Worker, part-time (10 
hours a week) clerk and part-time (10 hours a week) Program Coordinator. These funds also support 
the mailing and printing of our monthly newsletter, the "Buzzell Buzz." This informative and 
entertaining newsletter is written and edited by a wonderful group of volunteers. Without their time 
and dedication this newsletter would not be possible. The "Buzzell Buzz" not only provides 
information about activities and great photos of the Buzzell Senior Center but also about the many 
assistance programs such as prescription programs, Senior Tax Work-Off Program, Fuel Assistance 
program, food stamps, Medicaid applications, RIDE applications and other types of services that are 
available to the elders in the community. The newsletter can be found at the Buzzell Senior Center, 
the Town Manager's Office and the Wilmington Memorial Library. It can also be viewed on our town 
website. 

The Department of Elderly Services would like to thank the residents of Wilmington for their support 
(at the Annual Town Meeting) to purchase a new handicapped accessible passenger van for our elders. 
Wilmington is extremely unique in providing free transportation service to all residents over the age of 
60 years. Transportation is provided within a thirteen-mile radius of Wilmington with our full-time van 
driver. We are fortunate to have a van that is also equipped to accommodate a wheelchair along with its 
passengers. We are able to transport elders to include, but not limited to, their medical appointments, 
shopping and to the Buzzell Senior Center. The van continues to be a vital service to the elders of 
Wilmington. There were over 21,555 miles traveled in 2011. 

The Department of Elderly Services continues to serve our home delivered meals program. This 
program provides the homebound elders of Wilmington with one hot meal five days a week, for the 
minimal cost of $2.00 a meal. There are approximately 55 - 65 meals delivered daily, Monday 
through Friday, to the elders of Wilmington. Elders not only rely on these meals, but also the daily 
contact. The drivers are responsible to return to the Senior Center after their deliveries to give an 
update on the elders they visited. The elders and their families are assured that if there should be a 
problem during the time of the delivery, the elder will be assisted and the families will be notified. 
Overall, the home delivered meals program is a crucial part of the Department's services. A total of 
12,027 meals were served to the elders in our community in 2011. 

Another one of our continuing specialty programs is the "Medical Equipment Lending Program," a 
service that has increased in demand. Elders and their families can borrow equipment in order to 
stay home safely and assist in deferring the cost of such equipment. We offer wheelchairs, walkers, 
canes, bath chairs, benches and commodes. During the year 2011, we provided approximately 10-12 
medical pieces of equipment monthly. We continue to receive calls from elders and their families as 
well as from the local Visiting Nurses' Association. We are also fortunate to offer electric 
wheelchairs, scooters and electric recliners as part of this lending program. The Department has the 
support of the Friendship Lodge in Wilmington as a resource for extraneous medical equipment that 
we may not have for those in need. 

For the year 2011, the need for social services continued to increase: fuel assistance, health 
insurance issues, Medicare Part D program, filing property tax abatements and deferrals, 
prescription costs (Prescription Advantage Program), protective service issues (elder abuse) and 
including the age bracket of 50-59 that are often ineligible for government programs. With this 
emergent need, the Department continues to find themselves on the frontline of providing services 
and referrals and continues to work very closely with the Police and Fire Departments. This year 
there were 43 intense protective service cases where all three departments were very cooperative in 
providing the necessary services to protect and help these elders. This, in turn, has increased the 
amount of home visits by the Director, Outreach Worker and Case Manager. Case management is a 
collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation and advocacy for options and services to 
meet an elder's health and social needs through communication and available resources to promote 
quality outcomes. Collectively these services enable the Department to develop a bond of trust 
between our staff and elders. 



-73- 



Other monthly services include the Podiatrist, SHINE (Serving the Health Information Needs of 
Elders) coordinators Marilyn Penny, Charlotte Stewart and Shirley Estrella and Shear Pleasure 
(hair stylist). Annually, volunteer accountants from VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Program), 
beginning the first week of February through the second week of April, assist Wilmington elders 
with their income taxes at the Wilmington Town Hall Auditorium. For 2011, there were 185 elders 
served through this program, a nine percent increase from 2010, and several of them were able to 
receive additional refunds due to the "Circuit Breaker" tax break. 



The Department has been able to develop wonderful intergenerational relationships with the 
students of Wilmington. Numerous studies show the benefits of intergenerational relationships not 
only for younger generations, but also for older adults. Elders who are involved in intergenerational 
activities often feel happier than those who do not participate. Some studies have also suggested 
that it increases physical, cognitive and social activity and helps improve health for an aging 
population as well as educational learning for children. This has proven true within our own 
community. This past year elders and students collaboratively produced "Wilmington Has Talent." 
This live performance was held in November at the Wilmington High School Auditorium. Students 
and elders worked hand in hand in producing this show with Audrey Reed, a volunteer producer. 
Everyone had so much fun and was able to appreciate one another and their individual talents. All 
proceeds from this show went directly to the Wilmington High School Scholarship Fund. 

Another instrumental Wilmington High School student 
organization is Rotary Interact led by Jack Cushing. Jack 
and the students assisted throughout the year with our 
'Valentines Day Celebration" serving over 100 elders a 
"Harrow's Pot Pie" lunch and fresh homemade desserts. 
In May 2011, the students hosted a "Wilmington Trivia 
Night" at the Center. They provided a delicious dinner of 
hamburgers and hot dogs and Jack Cushing's famous 
chocolate chip cookies. Again in November 2011, over 85 
students raked 12 elderly resident's yards. The elders 
were extremely appreciative for a much needed service. 




Rotary Interact members volunteer their time 
to rake the yards of local elders. 



On Wednesday, December 21, 2011, Wilmington High School hosted a "Strings Attached" 
performance orchestrated by Ward Dilmore and the Wilmington Music Department at the 
Wilmington High School Auditorium. Elders were able to enjoy a wonderful, live performance from 
the students, as well as by the Wilmington High School Chorus led by Wilmington High School 
Music/Drama Director Jason Luciana. The performance was followed by refreshments provided by 
Wilmington High School Medical Career Group and Sue Rowe, High School Nurse, and WHS Club 
led by Lisa Desberg, Wilmington High School English Department. 



The Department tries to give back to the students of our community through the Wilmington High 
School Scholarship Fund. On Friday, June 3, 2011, the Department of Elderly Services was able to 
award two scholarships; this year's recipients were Chris Deacetis from Shawsheen Technical High 
School and Melissa Preziosi from Wilmington High School. Both students were outstanding 
volunteers to the Department and to the Town of Wilmington; the Department congratulates them 
and wishes them well in their future endeavors. 




In 2011 the elders were able to experience the Wii, an 
electronic gaming device thanks to Wilmington Middle School 
student, Joey Tavenese. Joey presented the Wii to the center 
as part of his community service project in receiving his black 
belt. He not only showed the elders how to play, but he 
donated a Wii gaming system to the center! As a result, there 
will be many virtual bowling competitions in 2012. 



Paz Mendoza learns the ins and outs of 
Wii from Joey Tavenese. 



-74- 



Kids Cooking Green Celebratory Harvest 




The "Buzzell Bees" of the Department of Elderly Services participated in the Relay for Life of 2011. 
The team raised $2,193.00 for the American Cancer Society, members were: Charlotte DeMarco, 
Susan Dembowski, Cerea Dembowski, Bertha Deprez, Mary D'Eon, Maureen Fiorenza, Jeanne 
Grant, Jane Hill, Stacey King, Terri Marciello, Paz Mendoza, Audrey Reed, Gayle Regan, Robin 
Theodos and John Wallace. The event was both exciting and emotional. There were several theme 
laps, decorative team sites and survivors sharing their inspirational stories. The Department was 
very proud to be able to share a small part of this noteworthy event. 

The Giving Tree this year was a huge success, therefore we would like to thank the many residents 
that participated in our annual Giving Tree event and to Boy Scout Troop 56 for their continued 
support. This program would not have been possible without all the outpouring generosity from the 
Wilmington residents, the Methodist Church, Kiwanis Club, other local organizations and 
surrounding towns. There were over 250 recipients who were overjoyed with appreciation. Thank 
you for making this annual program such a wonderful accomplishment! 

On Wednesday, April 6, 2011, the Department of Elderly Services celebrated its 25 th Anniversary of 
the opening of the Wilmington Buzzell Senior Center. There was an Open House for residents to 
have the opportunity to see what the department offers for services and programs. Residents were 
able to enjoy viewing and participating in the many different programs as well as light refreshments 
and giveaways throughout the day. On Thursday, May 26, 2011 the Wilmington Department of 
Elderly Services recognized over 100 elders at a Volunteer Appreciation luncheon at the Center. 
They were recognized and thanked for all their hard work and dedication throughout the year. 

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their generous donations in 
2011: Dunkin Donuts on Middlesex Avenue for their daily supply of donuts. Tewksbury/Wilmington 
Elks for their Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that served 230 seniors this year, Rotary for their 
monthly donations for financially strapped elders and the Rotary Interactive Group and The Kiwanis 
Club. Also, to all the participants who volunteered at the 2011 Annual Holiday Crafts Fair making 
it a huge success!! All proceeds from this fair benefit the Buzzell Senior Center to help strengthen 
our programs and to develop new and innovative projects to serve our elders. 

We would like to thank the Abundant Life Church for hosting several movie events throughout the 
year; Danvers Bank "Courtesy Crew" employees who assisted in our special homebound meal 
sponsored by the Wilmington Department of Elderly Services. On St. Patrick's Day, a delicious 
homemade corned beef and cabbage luncheon generously sponsored by Peter MacLellan and cooked 
by Lou Cimaglia, was enjoyed by over 100 elders. A thank you to Filter Fresh for their generous 
donation of coffee and supplies; Middlesex Sheriff s Department for providing an Italian dinner with 
dessert; Sons of Italy spaghetti and meatball supper, to the Kiwanis Organization for our Annual 
Summer Kick-off Dinner and Christmas Holiday Dinner at the Buzzell Senior Center. All of these 
organizations have been extremely generous to our Department and we would like to thank them for 
their continued support. A special thanks to all the clubs and businesses who donated generously for 
raffles and give-a-ways. 

A special thanks as well to the Town Manager, Michael Caira, and all Town department heads for 
their ongoing support and assistance. 



The Wilmington Housing Authority (WHA) is authorized to administer two housing programs in 
accordance with the Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) regulations for 
state-aided public housing and a small number of housing choice vouchers in accordance with the 
United States Housing and Urban Development Office of Public and Indian Housing (HUD) 
regulations (Federal Section 8 Certificate Program). The programs supply the Town with decent, 
safe and local affordable housing options. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting of four 
elected and one state appointed member, oversee the Authority's policies and procedures. The 
Executive Director is charged with the administration of these procedures. 




-76- 



At the close of 2011, the Wilmington Housing Authority programs provided state-aided affordable 
housing to 117 residents. The Elderly/Handicapped housing (Chapter 667) is located on Deming 
Way and our family housing (Chapter 705) is scattered throughout the town. As always, the 
Authority gives a preference on the waiting list to local Wilmington residents. 

The DHCD provided emergency construction funds for the repairs to an underground hot water pipe 
on Deming Way. We also repaired a road drain on Deming Way that has been creating back up 
water problems for years. The pipe was excavated and the damaged part was replaced. We then 
installed a duck bill at the end of the drain to prevent back flow and debris from damaging the pipe 
in the future. The problem of standing water around Deming Way after storms has been resolved. 
The WHA did have the emergency generator at our 667-2 building replaced this year. The generator 
backs up the sewer pumping system. 

The Housing Authority is prepared to submit to the state for approval a five year capital plan. The 
capital planning system that has been recently developed by the DHCD will allow the WHA to plan 
for a consistent flow of construction dollars each year. The total award to the WHA is $227,298 to be 
allocated over the next five fiscal years. The formula funding program allows us to plan for the 
modernization and improvements to our developments, however, the amount of funds available falls 
significantly short of our actual need. We have had to weigh the priority of each project before 
submitting our plan. We will continue to be creative and resourceful maintaining our properties to 
keep them viable. 

The Authority did not require a financial subsidy from the DHCD to manage our programs. The 
WHA finished the last fiscal year, which ended on September 30, 2011, having begun the recovery 
process by not being in a deficit. The state issued a 3% increase to our budget this fiscal year, after 
many years of zero and decreases. The limited budget makes our ability to fund extraordinary 
maintenance projects challenging. We will continue to achieve fiscal stability for our programs. Our 
Section 8 Program administrative fee schedule has been reduced by HUD. Our federal program is 
very small and cannot afford to suffer additional funding shortfalls. We are in the business of 
housing low income families, elderly and disabled community members and we continue to do this in 
spite of the lack of adequate state and federal funding. 

We are grateful for the efforts of our Executive Director, Maureen Hickey and our Administrative 
Housing Assistant, Denise Brown who handle the day-to-day operations and ensure the programs 
run efficiently. Our long time maintenance man, Vito Varano, resigned from his position recently. 
We accepted his resignation heavy hearted and wish him well as he embarks on an early retirement. 
Mr. Varano served the Wilmington Housing Authority for over eighteen years and was loved by the 
tenants. Mr. Varano will be missed. The Wilmington Housing Authority is in the process of hiring a 
new maintenance person. 

We also said good bye to Board Member, John Goggin. Mr. Goggin served on the Housing Authority 
Board for one term (five years). He served as Chairman, Vice Chairman and Treasurer. We will 
miss Mr. Goggin's sound opinions and penchant for proper meeting procedures. We wish Mr. Goggin 
the best. 

We are fortunate to have the expertise of Mr. Martin Robb as Housing Management Specialist, Ms. 
Linda Lamont as Project Manager and Mr. William Miller as Construction Advisor, all from the 
DHCD. 

Our continued thanks for the ongoing support and professionalism provided by Town Hall, the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and Elderly Services. We 
continue in our efforts to work cooperatively with the Town and all its departments with a goal of 
delivering comprehensive services to our tenants. 



-77- 



We welcome your questions and comments. Please feel free to visit the Wilmington Housing 
Authority office located at 41 Deming Way, or contact us at 978-658-8531. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Board of Commissioners 

Robert DiPasquale, Chairperson 
Leona Bombard, Treasurer 
Stacie Murphy, Vice-Treasurer 
Gregory Bendel 
State Appointee 




The Department of Veterans' Services office is responsible for the needs of all the veterans and their 
dependents residing in Wilmington. It is the Veterans' Service Officer (VSO) to whom the 
unemployed, the indigent, the disabled, the ill, or veterans otherwise in need, first apply for 
assistance. The VSO interviews the applicants, determines their eligibility and files requests for 
assistance. The VSO assists in filing for all veterans' benefits, including the Massachusetts program 
for indigent veterans and their dependents (Ch. 115). The Town of Wilmington receives 75% 
reimbursement from the State for funds expended by the Town in accordance with Ch. 115. The 
VSO also assists Wilmington veterans with applying for all other State benefits such as tuition 
waivers, grants, student loans, annuities, outreach centers, counseling, tax exemptions, 
Massachusetts cemeteries, employment, Veterans license plates, etc. 

Under the category of Federal Aid, veterans are assisted in 
processing applications for benefits including service-connected 
compensation, disability pensions, personal aid pensions, social 
security benefits, medical, education, housing, employment, medals, 
life insurance, death benefits and retrieving military records for 
veterans who, without such documents, would not be eligible for any 
benefits. The Wilmington Dept. of Veterans' Services has assisted 
veterans to increase the Federal benefits received through the 
Veterans Administration (VA) through compensation, pension and 
widow pension. Over $2M a year is being paid to Wilmington 
veterans and their dependents. 

The Department also works to coordinate public events such as 
Veterans' Day and Memorial Day observances. This past Memorial 
Day and Veterans' Day ceremonies were well attended by many 
Wilmington residents. The Department of Veterans' Services also 
assisted with the September 11 th ceremonies that marked the 10 th 
anniversary of the tragic events that occurred on September 11, 
2001. 

Louis Cimaglia, Director of Veterans' Services for the Town of Wilmington, also serves as the Graves 
Officer. He is responsible for the decoration of all veterans' graves in town on Memorial Day, and to 
carry out commemorative activities related to Wilmington veterans. 




The office of the Board of Health is located in the Town Hall at 121 Glen Road in Room 5 and the Public 
Health Nurse's office is located off of the foyer in the main entrance. The Board of Health consists of 
three members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. Serving on the Board 
in year 2011 were Elizabeth (Libby) Sabounjian, who served as the Chairman, James Ficociello, D.D.S. 
and Jane Williams-Vale, M.D. The Director of Public Health is Shelly Newhouse, R.S. 



EXPIRATION OF TERM 

April, 2013 
April, 2015 
April, 2012 
April, 2016 
Vacant 





-78- 



The Town has the service of Mark Masiello as a Food Inspector. The Public Health Nurse is Tina 
Scanlon, R.N. The Animal Inspector is Ellen Sawyer. The secretary for the Board of Health is Kim 
Mytych. 

The administrative duties of the office includes issuing permits, reviewing plans for subdivisions, 
septic systems and other development proposals, issuing enforcement orders and citations, holding 
hearings, keeping records, attending meetings, operation of the Board of Health website and other 
regular administrative duties. The Board of Health meetings were generally held twice monthly, on 
the first and third Tuesday and usually at 5:30 p.m. Records of all meetings and other documents 
are kept at the office of the Board of Health. 

Environmental field activities included inspection of restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, the Fourth of July activities, caterers and other 
temporary food stands such as the new Farmers' Market. The Farmers' Market was a new addition 
to the Town's summer events and it brought in 12-15 vendors each Sunday in the grassy area 
adjacent to the Fourth of July Building. Mostly food items were sold along with a few craft tables. 
Additional Board of Health responsibilities include percolation tests and soil evaluations, subsurface 
sewage disposal system inspections, recreational camp inspections, semi-public pool inspections, 
tanning salons, nuisance complaint investigations, hazardous waste investigations, housing 
inspections, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, lake water quality sampling, Canada Geese 
control, beaver control and other miscellaneous investigations and activities. 

This year proved to be a challenging one in the Health Department due to the absence of Public 
Health Nurse Judy Baggs for the first six months. Judy was unexpectedly out for the first half of 
2011 and subsequently retired after providing the Town with five years of service. In July of 2011, a 
new Public Health Nurse was hired. Tina Scanlon, R.N., became the Town's newest Public Health 
Nurse. Tina comes from the private sector nursing, with experience in the schools as a substitute 
school nurse. After a six month break-in period, learning the ins and outs of public health nursing, 
Tina has proven herself to be a welcome addition to the Board of Health. The clinical component of 
the Board of Health is primarily the responsibility of the Public Health Nurse. Department of Public 
Health mandated responsibilities include communicable disease surveillance, investigation and 
follow-up, adult and child immunization, Mantoux Skin Testing for Tuberculosis (TB) and TB Case 
Management. Non- mandated services include a number of health screenings and prevention and 
education programs for general wellness. 

The Public Health Nurse is active in the Massachusetts Association of Public Health Nurses, 
Massachusetts Health Officers Association, School Health and Wellness Advisory Committee and 
Community Health Network Area (CHNA-15). She attended emergency management trainings 
through MEMA and FEMA. Tina was certified as a BLS (Basic Life Support- CPR/AED) Instructor 
through the American Heart Association. 

Elder Services included weekly screening and education programs at the Buzzell Senior Center. 
Education programs encompassed current health issues, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's 
Disease, fall prevention, food borne illness etc. In-home elder services provided were home safety 
evaluations, health assessments, administration of prescribed medications and referral to medical 
providers and service agencies. 

The Public Health Nurse gave child and adult Hepatitis A and B, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, 
Mumps, Rubella, Polio, Pneumonia and Influenza immunizations in homes and in the office. Other 
in-home and in-office services include blood pressure, blood sugar and weight screenings, 
administration of prescribed medications, general health assessment and consultation and referral 
to medical, mental health and social work providers. CPR re-certification classes were held for Town 
Hall and library employees. These will continue into 2012. The Public Health Nurse continues as a 
site leader and training coordinator for the Board of Health Public Access Defibrillation Program. 
Automated External Defibrillators (AED) can be used by trained personnel in the event of cardiac 
arrest. 



-79- 



The Salvation Army Good Neighbor Energy Fund Program was administered. This program 
provides fuel and other energy assistance to income eligible residents. Referrals were made for 
assistance (basic living essentials and comfort and recreation services) to those in need. 

An Employee Health and Benefits Fair was held in May in coordination with Director of Health 
Services, Doreen Crowe, R.N. A number of local health providers from the Wilmington community 
participated such as chiropractors, nutritionists, massage therapists and various sports clubs. 
Retired Public Health Nurse, Ann Fitzgerald, R.N. and Doreen Crowe, R.N. performed blood 
pressure screenings for town employees. In addition, Concentra provided cholesterol screenings and 
BMI calculations and Winchester Hospital performed bone density screenings. Special thanks go out 
to Wendy Martiniello who works in the Town Manager's office for all her extra effort and help in 
organizing the Employee Health and Benefits fair. 

The Board of Health receives state supplied flu vaccines every year. This year proved to be a 
challenge due to budget cuts across all departments in the state. Our state supplied allocation was 
drastically cut by 70%. Therefore, this year was the first year that the Board of Health purchased 
flu vaccines privately. This was done to meet the demand of our residents for flu shots. With the 
vaccine arriving in the fall of 2011, the Board of Health held a Town wide flu clinic at the Town Hall 
and another at the Senior Center. Several small clinics were subsequently held in the Public Health 
Nurse's office. The public flu clinics were for all residents' ages five and up. School based flu clinics 
were once again held with the cooperation of all the school nurses and school department staff. Flu 
vaccinations are expected to continue into the beginning part of the 2012 calendar year. Daily 
surveillance for Influenza-like illness in the community is an ongoing effort by the Town nurse and 
school nurses. To prevent flu like illness, infection controls were practiced in schools and in all 
public buildings. Since the Health Department is a Mass Immunization Site, the department took 
advantage of a reimbursement program administered by the National Health Information Center 
(NHIC) and UMass Medical that reimburses towns for the program costs related to the seasonal flu 
vaccine. This year Kim Mytych took part in a training program to learn about submitting claims for 
reimbursement from various private insurance companies and Medicare for administering and 
administrative costs associated with the flu vaccination clinics. 

The Director led the on-going activities of the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). Both medical and non- 
medical members of the community are encouraged to join and become part of a public health 
emergency response team whose function is to respond to emergencies such as bioterrorism, 
hurricanes, vaccination planning and other such disasters. During the early seasonal flu clinics late 
this past year, MRC volunteers continued to work all of our planned clinics. 

The Director served as a member for the Region 4A Coalition, a group of 34 communities designated 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH). The coalition receives grant funding 
for local Boards of Health for emergency planning and infrastructure improvements for emergency 
response activities. In 2011, the Board of Health received grants and equipment from the region for 
improvements and upgrades for local emergency planning. In addition, the department also 
continued to use public health emergency response funds for flu clinic planning and preparation. 
The purpose of Public Health Emergency Management training is to develop an emergency ready 
Public Health Department. 

With these grant funds from the MDPH, the Board of Health outfitted all the Wilmington Public 
Schools and public buildings with hand sanitizer unit refills. The Board of Health also replenished 
clinic supplies for both the Public Health Nurse's office and all the school nurses. Office supplies, 
training expenses and a new computer were purchased for the Board of Health office. The Director 
and the Public Health Nurse frequently attended training in relation to public health emergency 
response held throughout the year. Trainings are always funded by the Public Health Emergency 
Preparedness (PHEP) grant program. 

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) held its annual seminar at the Wilmington 
Middle School. This annual seminar is conducted for health officers in the DEP Northeast Region 
and is hosted each year by the Wilmington Board of Health. 

-80- 



The Title 5 Septic System Betterment Loan Program, which began in 1999 and continued each year 
thereafter, received funding again in 2005 and was reauthorized in 2011. Loans were made to 
homeowners which are to be repaid to the town through the betterment process appearing on the 
regular tax bill. This was made possible by a $200,000 grant from DEP and the Massachusetts 
Environmental Trust and will continue as encumbered monies are still available. 

The Canada Geese Control Program has continued operations throughout the year in cooperation 
with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

In a continuing effort to control the environmental impact of elemental mercury, residents can 
exchange fever thermometers containing mercury for digital thermometers at no charge at the office 
of the Board of Health. The office will also receive and recycle thermostats, mercury switches and 
any other items which contain mercury. The recycling of fluorescent light tubes containing mercury 
from the schools and public buildings continued and residents are encouraged to bring compact 
fluorescent lamps to Aubuchon Hardware, 2261 Main Street, Tewksbury for recycling. This 
recycling program is supported by outside funding at no cost to the Town of Wilmington. 

The Annual Rabies Clinic was held April 2, 2011 at the Public Buildings Department on Church 
Street. A total of 200 dogs and cats were inoculated with rabies vaccine by Dr. James Kim of the 
Wilmington Veterinary Hospital. The next rabies clinic is planned to be held on Saturday April 7, 
2012. 

Funds Collected: 



Reimbursements for Influenza shots 


669 


00 


Nurse's Total Fees Collected (various testing) 





00 


Transport/Haulers Permits 


7,000 


00 


Animal Permits 


1,680 


00 


Funeral Homes 


200 


00 


Percolation/Soil Tests 


2,000 


00 


Sewage Disposal Systems Permits 


11,300. 


00 


Food Establishment Permits 


20,295 


00 


Tanning Salons 


300 


00 


Installers Licenses 


4,300 


00 


Subdivision Review 





.00 


Photo Copies 


23 


60 


Recreation Camps 


400 


00 


Well Permits 


550 


00 


Rabies Clinic 


2,010 


.00 


Pool Permits 


300 


00 


Housing Inspection Certificate Fee 





.00 


Ice Rink 





.00 


Tobacco Sales Permits 


4,200 


,00 


Mercury Reimbursement 


1,296 


.64 


TOTAL FEES COLLECTED 


$56,524 


.24 



-81- 




Effective July 1 , 2008 the responsibilities of this position were assumed by representatives from the 
State Division of Standards. The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures in calendar year 2011 for the Town of Wilmington: 



Inspections Number Sealed 

Tested and sealed supermarket scales 50 
Tested and sealed pharmacy weights 10 
Tested and sealed truck scales 9 
Tested and sealed gas station meters 166 
Miscellaneous 9 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures maintains fairness in the marketplace. 




Louis Cimaglia, Director of Veterans' Services, reviews flag etiquette with local scout troop. 




-82- 



EDUCATION 




The Wilmington Public School System has earned a reputation for educational excellence by 
creating exciting learning environments for our students, demanding the best from our 
talented staff and fostering cooperation and collaboration between our schools and the Town. 
We live in a community that always has valued education as an investment in our Town's 
future. On December 13, 1880, Edwin Eldes wrote to the "Gentlemen of the Wilmington 
School Committee" in his letter of resignation from the board, "When you visit the schools, 
will you please say to the scholars... they are fortunate in living in such a town as 
Wilmington is, and in enjoying the superior advantages of the Wilmington schools." One 
hundred thirty-one years later, the Wilmington Public Schools continue to strive to develop a 
community of diverse learners focused on ensuring that each student reaches his or her 
potential and achieves a foundation for joyful life long learning. Our community has done 
the right things for our school children. 

The Wilmington Public School System has much to be proud of as we look forward to the 
2011-2012 school year. Much has been accomplished. For the past five years Wilmington 
has concentrated energy and resources on the system-wide strategic plan. We are now in the 
process of creating a new plan. As President Eisenhower once said, "Plans are nothing; 
planning is everything." In the Wilmington Public Schools, we understand that the world is 
changing rapidly and will pose challenges to our children that we can barely imagine today. 
Only through proper planning can we give our children the sound, well-rounded education 
that will help them live and compete successfully throughout their lives. 

Many jobs that our children are likely to hold have not even been invented yet. What should 
we be teaching our students and how should we prioritize, especially in times of diminished 
resources? These important questions will be addressed in the District's Strategic Plan, 
which we will write this year. 

The foundation for the development of the strategic plan is the Wilmington Public Schools' 
continued commitment to high standards for student achievement. The new plan will also 
focus on the mission of the Wilmington Public Schools which states: 

"The Wilmington Public Schools will provide a student centered education which fosters 
critical inquiry enabling the individual to be a productive citizen, respectful of self and 
others, capable of adapting to a changing world and its technology." 

^ 

Wilmington prides itself on the value we place on public education. We strive to provide the highest 
quality educational experience for the children of Wilmington and to ensure that they have 
everything they need to succeed in the classroom, the art studio, the stage and on the ball field. 
Today's students will be the citizens and leaders of the 21st Century, heirs to a world that grows 
smaller and more interconnected everyday. It is our responsibility to educate, prepare and inspire 
all students to achieve their full potential as lifelong learners, thinkers and productive contributors 
to our global society. 

Bringing the Wilmington Public Schools into the 21st Century must continue to be a priority this 
year. Research has shown that teachers are the most important factor affecting student 
achievement. We must define what constitutes a 21st Century education and provide the teachers 
with the tools they need to meet this goal. We must provide our teachers with the technologies they 
need in order to teach our students. 

Collaboration, technology and personal reflection must be combined with new methodology and 
standards-driven curriculum to create a problem-based inquiry-learning environment. Our job is to 
create thinkers, leaders and problem solvers. As educators, our responsibility is stay ahead of the 
digital natives who enter our classrooms. Students must develop critical thinking, learning and 
study skills that take them beyond the classroom. 



-83- 



In the Wilmington Public Schools we are committed to preparing students for success by continuing 
to ensure that the K-12 curriculum offers a coherent course of study, yet remains flexible enough to 
allow for differentiation according to students' needs. Nothing is more crucial to the Wilmington 
Public Schools going forward than recruiting, retaining and nurturing highly qualified teachers who 
are prepared to give their best to Wilmington students. A strong professional development program, 
along with an effective system of supervision and evaluation, is key to realizing this goal. None of 
the challenges above can be met without strong, informed public support for the Wilmington Public 
Schools among parents, elected officials and citizens at large. 

In the fall of 2011, the Wilmington Public School System welcomed 32 new staff to its instructional 
corps. In addition, Kate Burnham joined the system as Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum 
and Staff Development and Robert Arsenault returned as Interim Principal of the Woburn Street 
and Wildwood Schools. We said goodbye to Marlaine Potter, Director of Special Education, and 
welcomed Mary Houde as Interim Director. On August 31 st we greeted 3,676 students as we opened 
our doors for a new school year. 

The Wilmington Public School System has much to be proud of as we look forward to the 2011-2012 
school year. Most importantly, the community has approved a new high school. My sincere thank 
you to the residents of Wilmington for coming out to vote in the election on December 6th and to 
Town Meeting on December 10 th . Because of your support, the community will have a new high 
school. This new school will serve current students and future students for decades and will allow us 
the opportunity to provide the learning environment needed in order to teach skills for the 21st 
Century. The legacy you are helping to establish will benefit today's students and future generations 
of students. 

The Wilmington Public Schools is proud to serve the town's students, parents and citizens. As a 
district, we are a reflection of our community. Education is something we value and share. It is this 
tremendous community support that drives us to improve. It is our hope that if Edwin Eldes were 
alive today, he would be writing the same message to the Town. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

This year has been an exciting time to be a member of Wilmington High 
School. After many hours of planning and preparation by the members of 
the High School Working Group and the Permanent Building Committee, 
the people of Wilmington voted to support the building of a new 
Wilmington High School. At a price tag of about 83 million dollars, the 
new facility will enable us to deliver a high quality, 21st Century education 
to the students of Wilmington. The anticipated building boasts larger 
classrooms, updated technologies, an additional 40,000 square feet of space 
and state-of-the-art science labs as well as a second floor walking track 
built into the gymnasium. Other aspects include a new turf football field, 
an additional athletics practice field, a much larger auditorium/music 
space and an interior open air courtyard. We are thankful for the support 
of the community and look forward to building a model school that will 
benefit future generations. 

This year, we began our athletics season as one of two new members of the Middlesex League. After 
a two year wait, we jumped in with both feet. During the fall season, our athletes showed that we 
can be competitive in the new league and quickly made their mark as solid performers. 

We welcomed several new staff members to WHS. Joanne DeMild, Michael Hildt and Diana Hill are 
new members of the Special Education Department. We also added Mark Linehan in the Science 
Department and Victoria Green in the Mathematics Department. They each bring a unique set of 
skills to Wilmington High School. We look forward to their contributions. 

This year, we added an exciting new course to our elective options, Sign Language. After several 
student and parent requests, we were able to bring in a part-time instructor to begin two sections of 
the class. Over 50 students flocked to the new offering. 




High School student Lauren 
Azevedo sings the National 
Anthem at 9/11 ceremony. 



-84- 



The Marketing class, in conjunction with the Life Skills Program, was able to open up the new school 
store called The Wildcat's Den. The store has enabled the Marketing students to work hand in hand 
with the Life Skills students to teach them the skills they will need for future success, interactions 
with people, counting and managing money and procuring and stocking inventory. To date, the store 
has been a huge success! 

As a whole, our students are off to a strong start this year. Over 40 students made it to the state 
competition level at the local DECA conference in November. This is an impressive accomplishment 
for a program that is only three years old. Student Rachel Alatalo completed a 50 thousand word 
novel and Rachel Grabar was selected as Honorary Mention for the MIAA Essay and Poetry contest. 
Kristen Esdale was selected as the Superintendent's Leadership Award winner and was presented 
with a Certificate at a School Committee meeting. We are very proud of the accomplishments so 
early in the year and look forward to many more!! 

Business Department 

The Business Department continues to thrive and grow with academic activities as well as extra- 
curricular activities available to challenge students. The business courses continue to offer a 
challenging curriculum fostering critical thought while providing opportunities for problem solving 
and course mastery. 

Once again, students from Mrs. Canty's and Ms. Cool's Managing Your Money course participated in 
the U. S. Department of the Treasury's 2011 National Financial Capability Challenge in the spring 
of 2011. The National Financial Literacy Capability Challenge is designed to increase the financial 
knowledge of high school students in an effort to enable students to control their financial futures. 

Our Managing Your Money students have continued to achieve great success in the Challenge on the 
national level. Students scoring in the top 20 th percentile of the nation's scores were invited to 
attend a celebration of Excellence in Financial Capability in June 2011 at the Federal Reserve Bank 
of Boston in recognition of their achievement. The following students receiving this recognition were 
Allison Carroll, Brian Pickett, Jeffrey Favuzza, Courtney Cavanaugh, Brandon Wong, Jonathan 
Stratouly (Perfect Score), Andrea Simpson and Peter Ammon. Students who scored above the 
national average included Matthew Diorio, Andrew Hoang, Jess DeNorscia, Katherine Johnston, 
Jimmy Stein, David Hanson, Angelina Amato, Drew Cummings, Cat Parella, Dalton Rolli and D. J. 
Weaver. 

Managing Your Money has become a graduation requirement beginning with the Class of 2015 to 
ensure that our students continue to be financially literate and acquire the skills necessary to make 
smart financial choices. In this course students learn about the importance of financial planning, 
budgeting, investing, credit, financial services and insurance protection. 

The virtual Stock Market Game has continued to be one of the highlights of the Managing Your 
Money course. Over the course of a 10-week period, students have learned about stock basics, stock 
research and maintain a portfolio of stock investments. This year students have competed against 
over 700 teams throughout the state of Massachusetts. Our top team this year, Zachary Curley and 
Drew Foley, finished in 24 th place! 

The Business Department is buzzing with enthusiastic students who are signing up for new courses 
and participating in the school store. 

One of the popular new courses being offered is Honors Sports and Entertainment Marketing. 
Students are learning about how sports franchises and entertainers make money as well as all 
aspects of marketing, management and careers within the field. Students recently had a chance to 
showcase their knowledge and creativity by presenting marketing ideas to marketing executives at 
The Hall at Patriot Place. The executives were impressed with the ideas Wilmington High School 
students developed to increase attendance to The Hall from student selected target markets. 



-85- 



The school is pleased to open the Wilmington High School store, named by students as "The 
Wildcat's Den." Students who are enrolled in Marketing, Accounting and Entrepreneurship classes 
work in the store as part of their curriculum. The students have run promotional campaigns to 
generate excitement for their product selections for Spirit Week and for the holiday shopping frenzy. 
Students run the store, select the merchandise and keep the financial records making this endeavor 
a fantastic investment made by the Wilmington Education Foundation who enabled the store's 
existence through a grant. Life Skills students partner with the business students to run the store 
which makes this a great learning endeavor for all. 

The DECA Club, which prepares emerging leaders and entrepreneurs in marketing, finance, 
hospitality and management in high schools and colleges around the globe, enhances the co- 
curricular education of students who are enrolled in a business course. The DECA Club has had 
continued success in competition at the District, State and National levels. Earlier this year, three 
DECA students and their advisor participated in the International Career Development Conference 
and Competition in Orlando, Florida. On December 16, 53 WHS students competed in the DECA 
district competition against eight other schools. Students answered a 100 question business test 
followed by a business role play where they developed a solution to a business problem and 
presented it to a business professional who rated their performance. Wilmington High School 
business students continually demonstrate their ability to think quickly on their feet and 
demonstrate critical thinking skills and creativity. As a result, WHS won 41 medals and those 
students will attend the State competition in March held in Boston with the aspirations of winning a 
top spot in order to compete at the 2012 International Competition in Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Additionally, 12 Life Skills students participated in the DECA District conference, enjoyed their own 
competition, received medallions and shared camaraderie with the DECA Club. 

English Department 

The 2011-2012 school year is the English Department's fifth and final year of curriculum renewal. 
The renewal committee members include the following six high school teachers: Cathy Daley, Lisa 
Desberg, Maureen Dolan, Meghan Estrada, Claire Hitschler, Mia Parviainen and John Lewis. The 
six department members are analyzing longitudinal MCAS data in chart and narrative form in order 
to evaluate trends and issues and strengths and weaknesses in student performance across a given 
year's time spam. Our target is to evaluate the data analysis in order to inform curriculum, 
instruction and assessment at various grade levels. All renewal activities align the department's 
curriculum with year five of the school system's Strategic Plan and the schools' mission statements. 
The following contributions of the English Department members make a strong impact within the 
department and the Wilmington Public School system. 

In October 2011, Ms. Maureen Dolan, Mrs. Meghan Estrada and Mr. Joseph Kleponis attended the 
New England Association of Teachers of English conference; they went to workshops on integrating 
technology, applying the new Common Core State Standards and differentiated instruction as it 
relates to the English classroom. 

In November 2011, Ms. Mia Parviainen's creative writing student Rachel Alatalo successfully 
completed National Novel Writing Month. During the month of November, Rachel wrote a 50,000 
word novel. Ms. Lisa Bellavia and Ms. Parviainen advise the high school's literary magazine, 
Expressions. Expressions is hosting an Open Mic Night in February 2012. 

Mrs. Claire Hitschler wrote an article about utilizing Edmodo in an English classroom and it is 
featured in MassCue's online magazine. Mrs. Hitschler also offers an MCAS preparatory class one 
day a week after school. 

Mr. Kleponis is a published poet; recently, he was one of six finalists in the New England Association 
of Teachers of English (NEATE) 2011 poetry competition. At the NEATE conference, Mr. Kleponis 
read two thought provoking poems based on scenes in nature and shared his thoughts on the writing 
process, his inspiration and the art of poetry. 



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Ms. Marissa Bortone, Ms. Catherine Daley, Mrs. Claire Hitschler and Ms. Maura Lynch had WHS 
alumni and Vietnam veteran Mr. Fred Shine, come and talk about his experiences and how they 
related to those in Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried. 

The high school's English Department offers the following electives: Creative Writing and Language 
Arts Workshop taught by Ms. Parviainen, Expository Writing taught by Ms. Lynch, Film Studies 
taught by Ms. Dolan and Facing History and Ourselves co-taught by Ms. Desberg and social studies 
teacher Mrs. Maura Tucker. 

Ms. Desberg and social studies teacher Mrs. Tucker took Facing History and Ourselves students on 
two separate occasions to see Paul Rusesabagina and Elie Wiesel, genocide survivors and human 
rights activist, in Faneuil Hall in October and November 2011. They also took their students to the 
Boston Holocaust Center North's Human Rights Awareness Program to see another Holocaust 
survivor and Rwandan genocide survivor as well as a Lost Boy from Sudan in November 2011. 

Ms. Bortone and Ms. Lynch will be leading eight students to London, England in April 2012. There, 
they will head to Shakespeare's Globe Theater for a performance and interactive tour, to his home 
and to Anne Hathaway's home among other noteworthy sites. 

Ms. Lisa Bellavia is the Class of 2015 advisor. Ms. Marissa Bortone is the Class of 2012 advisor. 
Ms. Lisa Desberg is the PEACE Club and the Club WHS advisor. Mrs. Meghan Estrada is the 
SADD advisor. 

Foreign Language Department 

The high school is pleased to announce that two classes of American Sign Language (ASL) are being 
offered each semester this year. Teaching ASL is Ms. Chanel Garcia, who worked for the last seven 
years in Wilmington as an interpreter for a deaf student who graduated in 2011. 

Three languages instead of two are now being offered in grade 6 at Wilmington Middle School. 
Besides Spanish and French, there are now four sections of Italian. Our Italian teachers are Mrs. 
Lauren Fazio, who spent several weeks in July in Italy thanks to a Wilmington Educational 
Foundation Summer Travel Grant and Mrs. Rosangela Roman, a native speaker. The high school 
Foreign Language Department is now offering a three year sequence in Italian (Italian 1, 2 and 3) 
which will allow students to fulfill the language requirement for many state universities. This 
Italian program is funded in part by a grant from the Centro Attivita Scolastiche Italiane (C.A.S.I.T). 

Congratulations to high school Spanish teachers Rebecca Martiniello and Alba Santana who both 
completed their MAT in Spanish degrees at Salem State University with Honors. 

Seven high school students will be travelling to Costa Rica during April vacation 2012 for a 10 day 
stay. Staff chaperones are Ms. Pietro and Ms. Santana. 

The Foreign Language Club hosted their Culture Festival on March 10, 2011 in the high school 
cafeteria. There were booths from many countries, traditional foods, entertainment, raffles and 
prizes. This event was open to the public and was extremely well-attended. The Club will host an 
international holiday breakfast for faculty and staff on December 22. 

Curriculum Team Leader Joyce Beckwith was promoted to the rank of Officer in the Order of the 
French Academic Palms by the Ministry of Education in France for her efforts in promoting the 
French language and francophone culture across the United States. A medal ceremony was held at 
the residence of Mr. Christophe Guilhou, the French Consul in Boston, Mrs. Beckwith was also re- 
elected to serve a three year term (2012-2014) on the National Board of the American Association of 
Teachers of French (AATF). She also serves on the Board of the Massachusetts Foreign Language 
Association (MaFLA). 

Italian teacher Daniel Indiciani was elected Secretary of the Massachusetts Italian Teachers' 
Association (MITA). 



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Cynthia Irish, Spanish teacher at Wilmington Middle School, won a two week scholarship in July to 
attend the Cemanhuac Institute in Cuernavaca, Mexico. She reported on her trip to Mexico at a 
session at the MaFIA Fall Conference in Sturbridge from October 26-26. Terresa Pietro, Alba 
Santana and Joyce Beckwith also presented sessions at MaFLA this year. 

Spanish teacher Meghan Burns attended the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and 
Portuguese (AATSP) Annual Conference in July in Washington, D.C. Curriculum Team Leader 
(CTL) Joyce Beckwith attended and presented several sessions at the AATF Annual Conference, also 
in July, in Montreal, Canada. Three other teachers attended a summer immersion program at 
Lasell College, sponsored by MaFLA: Joanne Veliz in French and Rebecca Martiniello and Cynthia 
Irish in Spanish. 

Guidance Department 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department is committed to serving our students and their 
parents. Over the course of the academic year, the guidance team seizes numerous opportunities to 
reach out to our families and communicate important information regarding grade level issues, 
college planning, career exploration and personal and emotional well being. 

In its second year of adoption, Naviance is being used to its fullest capacity. From career planning to 
college research, Naviance offers interest inventories, career guidance and post-graduate resources 
to help students realize their goals. The counselors introduced Naviance in January to grade 10 
students in grade level seminars to familiarize them with the features of Naviance and to jump start 
interest in college and beyond. 

The Wilmington High School Guidance staff believes that the college planning process demands a 
comprehensive approach. The counselors have worked diligently to develop programs that address 
the various stages of the process. Beginning in February, an evening program, Junior Parent Night, 
coincided with in-class junior seminars focused on the initial steps in implementing an effective 
college search process. In September, as a follow-up to this presentation, the guidance staff 
sponsored the Senior Parent Breakfast. At this open forum, the parents were given an opportunity 
to ask specific questions that may have arisen as they explored college options with their student. In 
2011, this event was attended by 80 parents. Within a week of this presentation, the senior 
seminars were held in the high school library where students accessed Naviance and other college 
resources. Grade 12 students also met individually with their counselors where the finer points of 
college applications were discussed. In October, the high school guidance staff co-sponsored the Co- 
operative College Fair at the Shriners Auditorium. At this event the entire counseling staff was in 
attendance to answer questions and guide students to meet with college admissions representatives. 
Students were encouraged to attend this event which provided access to over 150 colleges and 
universities. In an effort to provide information about funding a college education, the guidance 
department presented a Financial Aid Night where a representative from a local university 
answered important questions about applying for financial aid. In addition, information about 
scholarship opportunities is maintained both in Naviance and the Scholarship Binder, which is 
located in the guidance office. The Alumni Roundtable, held during the college winter break, will 
welcome members of the previous year's graduating class who are eager to share anecdotes about 
college life. In January of 201 1, 17 members of the class of 2010 returned to regale our future 
graduates with stories of their college experiences. Each of these events contributes to supporting 
students and their families in successful realization of future goals. 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department offers college preparatory testing through the 
College Board. One hundred eighty three students participated in the May 2011 Scholastic Aptitude 
test. In mid-October, the guidance staff administered the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test to 
226 sophomore and junior students. In addition, 154 students participated in the November 
Scholastic Aptitude Test. In conjunction with the WHS Advanced Placement curriculum, 87 
students tested in the College Board's Advanced Placement Program under the direction of the 
guidance curriculum team leader. 



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To date, the high school counseling staff has processed over 784 college applications with over 53% of 
seniors applying to college. We are proud to announce that our students have been accepted to the 
following colleges: Babson College, Boston College, Bridgewater State University, Coastal Carolina 
University, Colby-Sawyer College, Curry College, Fisher College, Franklin Pierce University, High 
Point University, Hofstra University, Johnson & Wales University, Lasell College, Missouri 
University of Science and Technology, New England College, New England Culinary Institute, 
Northeastern University, Plymouth State University, Purdue University, Rivier College, Rutgers, 
The State University of New Jersey at Newark, Saint Anselm College, Salve Regina University, 
Simmons College, Southern New Hampshire University, Thomas College, University of Hartford, 
University of Maine, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of New England, University 
of New Haven and University of Vermont 

Members of the Class of 2011 are attending the following colleges: Arizona State University, 
Assumption College, Bentley University, Berklee College of Music, Boston College, Boston 
University, Brandeis University, Bridgewater State University, Bryant University, Champlain 
College, Colby College, Colby-Sawyer College, Columbia College, Connecticut College, Curry College 
, Dean College, Emerson College, Fitchburg State University, Florida Gulf Coast University, 
Fordham University, Framingham State University, Franklin Pierce University, Goucher College, 
Harvard University, High Point University, Hofstra University, James Madison University, Johnson 
& Wales University, Keene State College, Lasell College, Lesley University, Lyndon State College, 
Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Massachusetts 
College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Merrimack College, 
Middlesex Community College, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Newbury College, 
Nichols College, North Carolina State University, Northeastern University, Norwich University, 
Nova Southeastern University, Pitzer College, Plymouth State University, Regis College, Roger 
Williams University, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Saint Anselm College, Salem 
State University, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Simmons College, Southern New Hampshire 
University, Springfield College, Suffolk University, The New York Conservatory for Dramatic Arts- 
School of Film & Television, Tufts University, Unity College, University of Connecticut, University of 
Maine at Farmington, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 
University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, University of New 
Hampshire, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, University of Rhode Island, Wentworth 
Institute of Technology, Western New England University, Westfield State University, Wheelock 
College and Worcester State University 

Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department at Wilmington High School is comprised of 1 1 full-time teachers each 
teaching five classes and one curriculum team leader who teaches three classes. We have welcomed 
one new mathematics teacher this year that is starting her teaching career after recently graduating 
from Boston University. 

The courses offered in the Mathematics Department range from Algebra 1 through AP Calculus. 
Beginning with the Class of 2014, students are required to complete 20 credits of mathematics in 
order to be eligible for graduation, making mathematics a four-year requirement at Wilmington High 
School. At this time our current juniors and seniors complete their three year program with Algebra 
2 and may choose a fourth year of mathematics from one of our senior electives which include 2 
programming courses, Algebra 3, Pre Calculus, Introduction to Trigonometry, Introduction to 
Probability & Statistics, Statistics, Honors Calculus AB and AP Calculus AB. We have also decided 
to include more options for our seniors and at this time we are proposing to include an Engineering 
Design course in our program for the 2011-2012 school year. We hope to introduce students to the 
different fields of engineering and also to the engineering design process. Many of our current ninth 
graders have completed Algebra 1 in grade 8 and are enrolled in Geometry this year. They will 
advance to Algebra 2 as sophomores. We anticipate a revision to our High School Mathematics 
Program over the next several years as we anticipate the need to expand our offerings as we begin 
our curriculum renewal process. This process has begun and several high school and middle school 
teachers are involved in this work. We have started this project with a series of visits to other high 
schools to investigate their programs and to evaluate our own. This work as well as our curriculum 



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work that is ongoing, will prepare us to complete the tasks of this process. Another aspect of this 
work requires us to align our curriculum to the Common Core Standards on which our newly 
developed Massachusetts State Standards have been based. 

Our high school students continue to improve in our standardized testing. MCAS results were very 
positive again this year with a large percentage of our students scoring either in the Proficient or 
Advanced status. We continue to offer a Math Workshop course to our tenth graders as a 
preparation for the May exams. This course is designed to reinforce skills and to develop test-taking 
strategies. We also offer opportunities for extra preparation for eligible students through our 
Academic Support Services Program which is offered three different times during the school year 
and sometimes over the summer months. This program is funded by a grant which has been 
approved by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 

Our Advanced Placement testing in Calculus AB also demonstrates positive results with close to 
100% of those tested achieving a qualifying score on the 2011 exams. 

SAT Review classes are also offered through both the English and Mathematics departments. These 
classes are scheduled in the fall and also in the spring. Classes are offered in the evenings during 
the week and on Saturday mornings. The fall and spring sessions usually run for the six weeks prior 
to the SAT tests which are administered in November and December and in May and June. 

Science Department 

During 2011, the Wilmington High School Science Department made advances on several fronts in 
its continuous pursuit of excellence. As a member district of the Tri-City Technology Education 
Collaborative (TRITEC) members of the department had the opportunity to participate in high 
quality targeted professional development. The opening course in the program that started in 
January was Physics: Electricity & Magnetism taught by Professor Arthur Eisenkraft of UMass 
Boston. Not only did Al Chasse, 8 th grade science teacher at the Wilmington Middle School, enroll in 
the course as a student but the professor was also assisted by High School Physics/Chemistry 
teacher Jennifer Walker. The course was the first of a four part series to be delivered over the 
course of two years. In addition to receiving excellent instruction with direct classroom application, 
teachers also earn graduate credit which is offset by a modest stipend collected at the successful 
completion of each course. 

As a means of working towards science literacy, students in 
Environmental Studies took part in the 2011 Essay Writing Contest 
sponsored by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 
(MWRA). The contest was open to students from the 61 
communities served by the MWRA. The topic for the 2011 contest 
was "What a Clean Boston Harbor Means to Me". Melissa Dillon 
(2011) was recognized by the MWRA as a 2011 third place winner. 
Melissa was acknowledged at an awards ceremony in May at which 
time she was accompanied by science teacher Carol Mutchler and 
presented an additional acknowledgement by Representative James 
R. Miceli's office. 

In November, biology teacher Dawn Martell was informed that 
Wilmington High School and her Biotechnology students had been 
selected to participate in the Biotech Futures program at UMass 
Lowell under the auspices of the MassBioEd Foundation. Only eight 
schools in the region were selected so it was quite an honor to have 
our students recognized and involved. The event was part of an ongoing effort to increase interest in 
careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Lance Hartford, Executive 
Director of MassBioEd, stated that "This collaborative effort will allow the students who participated 
to apply science and theory to the practical world while participating in university labs. It is this 
blend of academic and experiential learning that provides students with the opportunity to fully 
grasp the wonders of science and career possibilities." 




Melissa Dillon accepts citation 
from Representative Miceli's office 



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Wilmington Middle School was represented by 12 students at the 
2011 Women in Science and Engineering (W.I.S.E.) program at Salem 
State University on March 15. Over 400 eighth grade girls from 
nearly 30 Massachusetts schools gathered for the all day conference 
which was designed to expose young women to the wide variety of 
interesting and challenging careers in mathematics and science 
(STEM). The students attended three different workshops led by women working in math or science 
focused fields. Many of the workshops included some hands-on activities to engage the students. 
The students were accompanied by 8 th grade science teacher Jennifer Judkins. 

Early in 2011, CTL James Megyesy was appointed to the Operations Board of the Governor's STEM 
Advisory Council chaired by Lieutenant Governor Timothy Murray. Mr. Megyesy also serves as the 
district contact for the Collaborative Project for Professional Development and the Northeast STEM 
Pipeline. Most recently he has taken on the role of serving on the Next Generation Science 
Standards Advisory Board (NGSS) for Massachusetts. 

Social Studies Department 

Members of the Wilmington High School Social Studies Department continue to participate in 
History Connected, which offers professional development funded by a Teaching American History 
Grant, sponsored by the United States Department of Education. Through this grant teachers have 
the opportunity to participate in a History Book Group, School Day Seminars and a weeklong 
Summer Institute. One of the highlights of year two of History Connected came when Christian 
Appy, the author of Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered from All Sides, attended the discussion 
of his book on April 25 and shared with the group personal stories from interviewing the many 
people featured in his book. 

The Social Studies Department (grades 6-12) entered into Year One of the Curriculum Renewal 
Process in the fall of 2011. During the fall, members of the middle and high school Social Studies 
Departments, along with the Middle School Library/Media Specialist, began meeting to study the 
latest trends and issues in Social Studies Education. The group has also begun to conduct a Needs 
Assessment and to develop Content Standards, comparing the courses being taught to the MA 
Frameworks, the Common Core and other national standards associated with Social Studies 
education. The participants have also begun to investigate possible schools to visit in early 2012. 
The schools visited will be those currently utilizing the technology, instructional techniques and 
assessment techniques that we are looking to bring to, or refine in, our classrooms. By the end of the 
2011-2012 school year the group will have written its Beliefs and Directions Statement, which will 
guide the group's future work. 

WILMINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 

In 2011, we welcomed several new staff members to the Wilmington Middle School: Jessica Busch, 
Special Education; Katherine Castelluccio, Music/Chorus; Lauren Fournier, Mathematics; Grayce 
McCreary, Social Studies; Dana Robinson, Special Education; Lauren Whalen, Special Education 
and Cara Wojcik, Art. We welcome them to our Middle School team where, as a faculty, we keep 
focus on our mission statement: Wilmington Middle School will provide a safe learning environment 
for all students and will inspire academic and social confidence, promote citizenship and encourage 
responsibility resulting in well-rounded individuals. 

Wilmington Middle School is fortunate to have well subscribed after school programs for students. 
The range of extra-curricular activities is as diverse as the talents and interests of our student body 
of 895 students. Eighth graders are leaders in our Student Council, organizing school dances, Spirit 
Week and charity drives/fundraisers. Our Math Team members and Future Scientists and 
Engineers of America work on problems and experiments that challenge their knowledge and hands- 
on skills. Drama Club features a cast and crew of over 80 students who put on our annual spring 
musical. Paw Prints, the middle school newspaper, is another creative outlet for students who enjoy 
interviewing others, writing stories and working with their peers. After School Sports attracts an 
active crowd who selects games and cooperative activities that get their heart rates up after the 
school day. Homework Club and Video Explorers also help students connect with classmates, stay 
organized and hone their reading and writing skills. 




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In January of 2011, the Wilmington Public Schools organized a Kindness Week where all schools in 
the district coordinated bullying prevention activities and programs. Sixth graders worked with The 
Academy of Traditional Karate, Inc. in physical education classes to build confidence and to 
encourage non-physical strategies and using your head to handle a bully. Seventh graders attended 
an assembly program entitled "Just One: Empowering Bystanders to Stop Bullying," presented by 
the Melrose Alliance Against Violence. Eighth graders participated in a multi-media program (set 
up by Camfel Productions) called "Balance of Power." This high-energy program discussed the 
themes of fairness, equity and facing adversity. Students were challenged to take responsibility for 
their choices and see the value of the obstacles they face each day. Students were inspired to reach 
for their dreams while, along the way, helping those around them to do the same. All middle school 
students and staff continue to use the lessons in our Second Step Violence Prevention curriculum 
focusing on Understanding the Problem, Training for Empathy, Anger Management, Problem 
Solving and Applying Skills. 

In order to reinforce the health curriculum, seventh and eighth grades attended an enrichment 
program presented by New Beginnings. Bill Phillips emceed the program and introduced us to his 
good friend, former Boston College Eagle and former New England Patriot, Chris Sullivan. Both 
gentlemen spoke of their personal experiences with drug and substance abuse and how their 
addictions have impacted their families, their professions and their personal health. This powerful 
program was made possible by the Middle School funds raised during the annual Wilmington 
Educational Foundation's Walk for WEF. 

Congratulations to Foreign Language teacher, Lauren Fazio and Visual Art teacher, Neal Roberts 
for receiving Summer Fellowship Awards from the Wilmington Educational Foundation. Mrs. Fazio 
traveled to Spain and Italy where she ran with the bulls in Pamplona, visited the Coliseum in Rome 
and most importantly collected materials and primary source items to share with her students. Mr. 
Roberts was able to visit the many Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C.: The Portrait 
Gallery, the American Art Museum and various art installations/sculptures throughout the city. His 
experience will serve as a foundation for eighth graders before their spring trip to see the art, 
monuments and architecture of our nation's capital. 

Mrs. Fazio's tour of Italy was quite timely as we initiated an Italian program for sixth graders in 
August of 2011. Over 80 students selected Italian as their language of study in grade 6. Students 
are exposed to the alphabet, the numbers, conversational phrases and culture in this introductory 
course. 

Sadly, Wilmington Middle School suffered the loss of a friend, colleague and mentor. Doug "Chern" 
Chernovetz passed away suddenly in early August. Students, staff and the community mourned the 
social studies teacher who was regarded as a talented coach, a strong motivator and a collaborative 
co-worker. Students and staff paid tribute to this educator and outdoorsman on November 23, 2011 
with a student vs. staff basketball game, "The Chernament of Champions" and the announcement of 
the Douglas J. Chernovetz scholarship. Students and staff respectfully paid homage to Doug and his 
motto, "Not learning is not an option." 

Learning is the priority at the Wilmington Middle School as 
students expand their knowledge in the areas of technology, 
collaboration and project-based learning. Students have 
become experts on using the flip-cam to teach others, 
projectors, document cameras and edmodo (a social network 
where teachers post homework and students reflect on 
what they are learning). Eighth graders in Discovery house 
researched a world leader and presented orally, and in 
writing, the leader's contributions to today's society. 
Computer Literacy students filmed, narrated, edited and 
formatted a 30 minute video on Winchester Hospital for its 
Centennial Celebration. Seventh grade science students 
Tommy Dunnett, Grade 8, with Principal ma( Je connections to their math learning with a unit on 
Christine McMenimen and Maureen Noone estimation and measurement. Sixth graders studying 
as their class studies the Middle Ages 




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Ancient Civilizations opted for projects that showed their strengths and their knowledge of the 
Neolithic Revolution. Students displayed facts about humans learning to produce food through 
farming and herding on interactive posters, creative songs, student-authored websites and plays. 

English Department 

Mrs. Jeanne McGonagle attended the Best New Young Adult Books workshop led by former chair of 
the Newbury Book Award. She shared Web 2.0 tools as they relate to English Language Arts (ELA) 
and Differentiated Instruction with the department. Ms. McGonagle is also working with literary 
professionals and her sixth grade English Language Arts colleagues, Mr. Brian Caira and Mr. 
Michael Mahoney to decide on a new sixth grade anchor book based on text complexity and the lexile 
measure. Also, Ms. McGonagle is leading a Wilmington University book club offering for middle 
school teachers. 

Mr. Caira serves as the co-advisor to the Wilmington Middle School student council alongside math 
teacher Nate Melbourne. There are over 40 eighth grade students in the council who are responsible 
for organizing and participating in school wide events and community service projects. 

Mrs. Dotty Bowen, Ms. Jill Olson and Ms. Kristin Smith took their students to see a live 
performance of Dickens' tale "A Christmas Carol" at the North Shore Music Theater. 

Mrs. Bowen, Ms. Olson and Ms. Smith are having their students partake in a simulated MCAS long 
composition prior to taking the MCAS in March. They will use their students' performance to inform 
instruction accordingly. 

Ms. Diana Kole and Ms. Olson are the WMS Drama Club faculty advisors. Over 80 students are 
members of this club, which is open to all student actors, singers, dancers and artists. The club will 
be performing the musical "Seussical" in March 2012. This show will be directed by both; 
specifically, Ms. Kole will be the choreographer and Ms. Olson will be the musical director. 

Ms. Kole, Mrs. Missy Simmons and Mr. Rick Cain are researching a better eighth grade summer 
reading choice based on the theme of bullying. 

Mrs. Simmons organizes the eighth grade Washington D.C. field trip. Students make a connection 
to the eighth grade ELA curricula when they explore the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum 
(USHMM). A major cornerstone of the grade eight curricula is literature that is based on the 
experiences during the Holocaust. Students read "The Diary of Anne Frank" and "Summer of My 
German Soldier" and also learn many aspects of the historical implications, but most importantly 
learn about tolerance, acceptance and what truly makes a human being a hero. Visiting the 
USHMM allows students to experience this part of history and human nature. 

Mr. Cain plans to lead a Wilmington University offering on writing conventions as it relates to the 
new Common Core State Standards. 

Social Studies Department 

Wilmington Middle School was greatly saddened by the 
unexpected death of 7th Grade Geography teacher, Doug 
Chernovetz. Mr. "Chern," as he was commonly known, 
touched the lives of many students and staff members 
during his career in Wilmington. Students and staff 
remembered Mr. Chernovetz on November 23 with a 
special basketball "Chernament," which saw the eighth 
graders square off against members of the faculty. The 
game was followed by the dedication of a special plaque to 
Mr. Chernovetz. Plans were also announced to establish a 
scholarship fund in the name of Mr. Chernovetz. It was a 
touching tribute to a teacher, friend and colleague. 

Members of Mr. Chernovetz's family were on hand for both the basketball game and the dedication of 
the plaque and appeared to be deeply touched by the outpouring of support for Mr. Chern. 




Chernament of Champions - Kellie Souza, 
Bridget Sullivan, Andrew Medros and 
Steven Godfrey 



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NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 



There are currently 312 students at the North Intermediate School in grades four and five. There 
are seven fourth grade classrooms, seven fifth grade classrooms and one language-based classroom 
at the school. Our students continue to have access to a broad academic curriculum that includes 
Reading/Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science. Students also participate in a variety of 
specialist periods each week. Music, Art, Physical Education, Library/Media, Health, Chorus and 
DARE provide students with a well-rounded curriculum. Our students continue to participate in the 
Second-Step anti-bullying program. 

We continue to work to update and improve our technology program. We are into our third year of 
implementation of the Renzulli Learning System in both grades 4 and 5. Renzulli is a web-based 
program that is designed to help students achieve by focusing on their strengths, their interests and 
the ways they like to learn and express themselves. Students are put in touch with engaging 
individualized resources, specifically chosen for their interest areas and learning styles. We also 
continue to utilize the Study Island Program. Study Island is another web-based program that 
includes specific instruction, assessment and reporting of student's performance. All lessons are 
built directly from state academic standards. We continue to utilize Smart Boards, a mimio device, 
In-Focus projectors, digital visual projection devices, Mimeo Vote and Kindle e-books to provide 
students with access to the latest technologies as well as the Internet. Mrs. Peachey, our library 
media instructor, continues to expand her use of our E-Instruction Classroom Performance System 
(CPS) in her classes. Through the assistance of the Wilmington Education Foundation (WEF) we 
were able to purchase a GradeMaster 600 Scanner. This allows us to quickly and efficiently grade 
student assessments as well as electronically store student data for future use. 

Improving our school-wide performance in math has been a primary goal at the North Intermediate 
School this year. Our students continue to participate in the Math Facts Challenge. Students are 
evaluated on a weekly basis on their ability to complete math facts problems in a timely manner. 
Students are tested in the four basic math operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and 
division). As they successfully complete each operation they are rewarded by their classroom 
teachers with a pencil which recognizes their achievement. When all four operations have been 
successfully mastered students are awarded a certificate and have their name and picture added to 
our "Math Facts Superstars" bulletin board. We implemented three before and after school math 
programs this past year. Both the Renzulli and Study Island programs were utilized to assist 
students in preparation for the Math MCAS exam. Two of our teachers started a Math Olympics 
challenge program for students after school as well. Our annual Math Immersion Day took place in 
April, prior to the spring MCAS math testing period. Curriculum Improvement Time has been 
utilized for staff to develop math lessons that focus on identified areas of weakness based on MCAS 
and Math benchmark testing data. All of these efforts led to overall math improvement on MCAS 
scores in 2011. 



Under the direction of school guidance counselor. Rebecca 
Farnham, the North Intermediate School implemented a new 
peer leadership program this year. This program was designed 
to expand on the positive aspects of both the peer mediation 
program and student council. Students were elected, from each 
grade five classroom, by their peers to represent the school as 
student leaders. These students, called the "NorthStars" have 
taken on a leadership role with several community service 
projects. They helped raise over $500 to assist students at our 
sister school in Wilmington, Vermont. This school received 
significant damage as a result of Hurricane Irene. They 
collected hats, scarves and mittens to donate to the Wilmington 
Clothing Pantry prior to the holidays. They helped organize an 
after school holiday craft project where over 100 students came 




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together to create crafts which were donated to local nursing homes. In cooperation with 
Wilmington Community Television (WCTV) these students are being trained how to operate digital 
video equipment. Ultimately, they will be charged with creating a video yearbook for the school. 

Communicating with parents and the community continues to be a top priority at the North 
Intermediate School. Three primary forms of communication are used. E-mail continues to be the 
quickest and most efficient means of communicating information in a timely manner. All staff 
regularly communicates, both among themselves and with parents, via e-mail. Secondly, we use our 
school website as a means of communicating more general school information. Lastly, and often in 
conjunction with our website, we continue to utilize the Alert Now phone information system. We 
have found that sending out phone/e-mail messages to alert parents of upcoming events, and/or 
directing them to the website for more detailed information, is both timely and efficient. 

In October, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary 
and Secondary Education and the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health presented the North 
Intermediate School with a Bronze-Level Massachusetts 
School Wellness Award. The featured wellness program at 
the North is called "Physically Fit Friday Health Tips." 
Each Friday morning our school nurse, Jane Ferrara, 
broadcasts information to the student body on how to 
maintain a healthy lifestyle. Always spiced with humor, 
her weekly health tips are very well-received. The North 
was recognized for going above and beyond what is required 
to ensure a safe and healthy learning environment. 

Safety continues to be a high priority at the North Intermediate School. In order to ensure the 
continuous improvement of these practices, the safety committee meets regularly to discuss ways to 
implement new procedures to address our changing needs. We have continued the process of 
providing room keys to all teachers and staff members and to require all volunteers complete CORI 
forms and all staff members wear I.D. badges. Visitors and volunteers are also required to wear 
badges whenever they are in the building for any reason and all staff members are required to have 
CORI checks completed. Various fire and emergency drills are conducted regularly to ensure 
readiness in the case of a real emergency. In the fall, we successfully conducted our second full 
school emergency evacuation. All students and staff safely and quickly evacuated the building. It is 
an ongoing goal of the North Intermediate School and the Wilmington Public Schools to anticipate 
any possible emergency situation and to develop a plan to ensure the safety of all students and 
school personnel. 

The North Intermediate School is extremely appreciative of the PAC for its ongoing generous 
support of our school and its programs. The fundraising activities they sponsor each year generate a 
considerable amount of money for programs and materials that benefit the school and enhance the 
curriculum. They provide enrichment programs for our students and generously purchase a variety 
of materials for the school. One recent purchase was a new laminating machine for the school. This 
year's enrichment activities have focused on Math and Anti-Bullying. Two PAC-sponsored activities 
that are extremely well-received are our annual Girl's Dance and Boy's Night Out. The North 
Intermediate School is grateful for the hard work and support of the PAC. We recognize it is the 
combined efforts of parents and teachers that create an atmosphere for learning which strives to 
meet the needs of each child and fosters the well-being and success of all students. 

WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The West Intermediate School prides itself on creating a positive environment; greeting children by 
name and making each child feel valued as members of the school community. The West 
Intermediate School staff is always working together to improve the quality of our instruction and 
our service to community. We had relatively few changes in the staff in the year 201 1. Kristen 
Meritt, grade five classroom teacher, left the West Intermediate School permanently, and her 
position was filled by Chelsea Lembo. In Art, Cara Wojcik was added to the West Intermediate and 
Wilmington Middle School staffs. 

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Staff members participated in continued professional development activities that support the 
District Strategic Plan and the North and West Intermediate Schools Improvement Plan. We 
continued with our web-based programs including Renzulli Learning, Study Island and other Web 
2.0 tools. In our classrooms, most teachers are now using Mimeo devices coupled with projectors, a 
set-up that allows direct student interaction with any program being used. We hosted a Family 
Math Night this fall, which was met with great enthusiasm. We have continued to expand our use of 
technology in both teaching and in student work, further ensuring that our students are provided the 
skills they need to become 21 st century learners. 

In the classrooms, we participated in many activities in addition to our academics. An important 
goal at the West Intermediate School is to instill in the children a sense of personal achievement and 
social awareness, particularly around bullying behaviors. The Second Step program has been very 
successful in teaching empathy and good decision-making skills to our students. We continued with 
our Explorer Day, Poetry Day and Math Immersion Day; participation in Wilmington Fire 
Department's Toys for Children In Need, collecting food for the local food pantry, the annual winter 
coat drive sponsored by Anton's cleaners and Box Tops for Education. 

In October, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education and Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health presented the West Intermediate School with a 
Bronze-Level Massachusetts School Wellness Award. The 
featured wellness program at the West is called "Recess 
Before Lunch." They recognized the West Intermediate 
School for going above and beyond what is required to ensure 
a safe and healthy learning environment. In gym, the 
children participated in the Five Minute Fitness Run, where 
every child in the school ran for five full minutes without 
stopping. In art, children participated in the Reading 
Municipal Light Department's T-shirt contest; made pottery, 
murals and collages that we displayed throughout the school. In music, the children performed a 
wonderful holiday concert in December. Our Wilmington Education Foundation (WEF) fundraiser 
walk in October was again a huge success, securing funds for use in the upcoming year. 

The Wilmington CARES program operates daily from the West Intermediate School and is an 
integral part of our school community. Kerin Ritchie is the site coordinator at the West Intermediate 
School. In addition to regular daily activities, she has also arranged for the children to attend 
sessions at GymStreet USA and for groups of children to spend time working on crafts projects at the 
Wilmington Health Care Center, which is a nursing home and rehabilitation center. 

The Shawsheen/West PAC continues to support grades one to five at both the Shawsheen 
Elementary and the West Intermediate Schools. They provide Student Planners and West T-shirts 
for every child. They fund enrichment programs, which included Mister Magnet, 
Techsploration/Simple Machines and Cryogenics. The PAC also organized additional activities such 
as the Ice Cream Social, Holiday Gift Fair, Grade 5 Student Yearbook, Family Game Night and the 
Grade 5 Yearbook Signing Party, which is the final farewell to the fifth graders as they prepare for 
middle school. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen Elementary School continues to serve students in grades one through three. We also 
house three special education classrooms: one is a multi-grade language based classroom serving 
students who present with academic challenges; the second classroom is a multi-grade classroom 
serving students who have a diagnosis that falls within the Autism Spectrum (Pathways) and the 
third classroom is a multi-grade program serving students with severe special needs that include 
both academic and medical challenges (Reach). This year a new speech and language pathologist 
was hired, Mrs. Kendra Stich. We also have a graduate student, Ms. Laura Kelley, assigned to our 
school as part of the Merrimack College Fellowship Program. In addition to working in one of the 
special education classrooms, she is also a student teacher in a grade two classroom. 

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With a focus on student achievement and student performance on standardized tests, the entire staff 
worked throughout the year in grade level and specialty groups, under the guidance of the 
Elementary Literacy Coordinator, Mr. Jerry LaPointe. During these meetings, staff analyzed 
student data from past assessments, which was provided as a result of investigations completed by 
the school's Data Team. In addition, staff conducted a concentrated look at the implementation of 
the Houghton-Mifflin Reading Program. It was concluded that knowing the reading ability level of 
each student and instructing students at the recommended small group, guided reading times was 
instrumental to student progress and achievement. 

The need to administer ongoing assessments in order to collect and analyze data to inform 
instruction remained key to designing lessons geared to the specific needs of the students. To this 
end, all first and second grade students were administered the Gates-MacGinite Reading Test in the 
spring. The results from this test provided teachers with current reading skills for their students. 
Additionally, this data was given to receiving teachers at the beginning of the school year so they 
would have some initial baseline information for each of their students. 

Both the first and second grade teams are involved with the Response to Intervention (RTI) 
initiative. They collect ongoing reading information on each of their students by conducting 
benchmark assessments throughout the year, helping them to determine the best interventions to be 
provided for all students to aid them in realizing steady reading progress and achievement. It has 
also been helpful in the early detection of at-risk students and getting them the necessary assistance 
to achieve. 

In addition, all teachers administer benchmark testing in math three times annually. Once again, 
the information collected from the assessment results provide teachers with more comprehensive 
data about their students' math skills. Finally, teachers will be conducting benchmark testing in 
reading using the Fountas and Pinnell Reading Assessment System. The results will assist teachers 
in determining the exact reading level of each of their students, which will greatly assist with 
reading instruction. 

School-run initiatives continue to support and celebrate student 

learning. The Math Word of the Week Program provides students 

with a weekly word aimed at building their mathematical 

vocabulary and understanding of a variety of math concepts. 

Students also participate in the Math Facts Challenge Program to 

assist them in learning the basic math facts in addition, 

subtraction, multiplication and division. The outcome of the 

program is to help each student earn a Math Honor Roll Certificate. 

Students prepare for the weekly 

The Reading Incentive Program continues to be offered to highlight Math Word of the Week drawing 
the importance of reading nightly. Last year's Reading Incentive 

Program, "Paws for Reading", witnessed a good amount of student participation. Students earned a 
monthly charm held on a chain with a final incentive of a special end of the year school assembly 
with a surprise visit from Willie the Wildcat. 

The Powerful Pencils Bulletin Board proved to be a wonderful opportunity for us to display the 
creative writings of the children. Each classroom takes a turn to exhibit writing pieces completed by 
students. At the Shawsheen, we remain committed to make reading/language arts and math vital to 
a child's learning experience. 

As we prepare students for the 21 st century, the staff members have been committed to integrating 
more technology in the classroom. As a result of grant opportunities, offered by the Wilmington 
Education Foundation (WEF) and the School Business Partnership, teachers have been awarded 
funds in order to purchase technology to be integrated in their classrooms to enhance their 
instructional practices. Several classrooms are now equipped with multi-media projectors and 
mimios. The computer lab was relocated and a ceiling-mounted projector was installed so teachers 
could conduct lessons during their weekly visits to the lab. 




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To assist third grade students with test-taking strategies, especially in preparation of the MCAS, the 
Shawsheen School once again offered an after school assistance program. All third grade students 
were invited to attend this program conducted one afternoon a week, for one and one half hours per 
session, for a six week period. Lessons are designed by a program coordinator and instructed by staff 
members. The lessons focus on specific test taking tips while using reading comprehension and 
language arts as the content areas. New this year, an after school assistance program was offered to 
students with special needs, following a similar program and content as the test taking program. 
Finally, a before school assistance program focused on math concepts and skills was provided for 
third grade students who would be targeted to benefit from extra reinforcement math practice. 
These assistance programs have been well received and attended. 

The Shawsheen faculty remains dedicated to working with students in becoming responsible 
citizens, respectful of one another. All staff members have been trained with respect to anti-bullying 
procedures, adhering to a protocol established by the district. The "Golden Rule" remains a steadfast 
guide for all interactions. The school's guidance counselor ran weekly lessons to reinforce positive 
and productive student interaction, using the Second Step program. The assistant principal and 
guidance counselor jointly conducted a character education program called, "Eight Keys to a Better 
Me." Each month a presentation on a specific value, such as responsibility and kindness, is provided 
for students during lunches that will become the monthly focused value. It is our goal to take 
proactive measures to help students learn how to make the right social and behavioral choices. 

During this past summer the Shawsheen School had new windows and doors installed. As a result 
of this face lift, the exterior of the school building looks remarkable. In addition to the cosmetic 
impact, the new windows and doors prevent water leakage during storms as well as being more 
energy efficient. We thank the Town of Wilmington for allocating the funds to have this project 
completed. 

The Shawsheen Elementary School remains committed to providing excellent educational 
opportunities and experiences for all students in a safe learning environment. We are able to 
achieve this goal as a result of the dedicated collaboration and contributions of all school community 
members including students, parents, public safety departments and the staff. 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

This year the Woburn Street School has a total enrollment of 472 students in grades one, two and 
three. There are seven first grade classrooms, eight second grade classrooms, seven third grade 
classrooms and one special education language based classroom. New staff members this year 
include Ms. Keriann Bartley who has taken the special education teaching position in the language 
based classroom. Ms. Niamh Daly has transferred into the position of special education service 
provider for grades one and two. We also have two graduate students from Merrimack College with 
us this year. Ms. Julie Fisher and Ms. Erin Murray are part of the Merrimack Fellowship Program 
and will be helping out as they finish their schooling. We also have Ms. Casey Meagher, an intern 
from Simmons College, working with Mrs. Traci Jansen in a third grade classroom. 

With the help of our School Advisory Council, we developed a 2011/2012 School Improvement Plan to 
guide us in the coming year. The first goal in the plan is to expand the use of AIMS web (an RTI 
assessment and data management program). Training will be provided for first and second grade 
staff in RTI and AIMS web to help support them in this endeavor. Included in the expansion of 
AIMS web and RTI will be scheduled interventions, benchmark testing three times a year and 
monthly progress monitoring. In first, second and third grade Mr. LaPointe, the elementary literacy 
coordinator, will be training teachers in the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System. 
This assessment system will be useful in obtaining an accurate reading level for all students. The 
second goal is to improve math instruction and student achievement. The elementary math 
coordinator, Terri Buscemi, will provide support and training for first and second year teachers with 
the curriculum. The math vertical team, made up of teachers, administrators and the math 
coordinator, will continue to examine ways to differentiate math instruction in the classroom and 
report back to the staff on their continued progress. In addition, the math coordinator and the 
vertical math team will work on the benchmark testing for grades one through three and develop 
ways to utilize the data received from these tests. 



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Another objective that the Woburn Street School is focusing on this year is communicating 
effectively with parents about curriculum and school initiatives. The Math Family Night was held in 
the fall and was very successful with support from staff, families and administrators. In the 
upcoming months we look forward to planning information sessions for parents on Reading Eggs, 
Title 1 and more about the RTI process. 

The Woburn Street School was pleased to utilize the funds raised from the Wilmington Education 
Foundation (WEF) last year to purchase leveled reading materials for grades one through three. The 
materials were organized this summer to create a literacy closet which all teachers can utilize to 
help in differentiating instruction in small groups. In addition, the school recently received four 
grants through the Innovative Teacher Grant Program sponsored by the Wilmington 
School/Business Partnership. Mr. Mclnerney will be trying out some new math manipulatives in 
second grade. In first grade, Ms. DiNicola will be using some dry erase markers and crayons for 
math. Mrs. Simons will be working with her students using story grammar markers. Selected 
teachers from each grade level will have an opportunity to work with recorder pens for reading. We 
are excited to use these new tools and expand their use to other teachers and grades. We are also 
continuing to expand our use of technology by encouraging teachers to continue to incorporate new 
technology tools into the delivery of daily lessons. Projectors, Smart Boards, Web 2.0 tools and web- 
based programs enhance the curriculum and provide new and creative ways to deliver instruction. 

The annual Reading Incentive Program continues this year to encourage children to read at home. 
Our theme is "Kick it up and Read" and the children have been busy reading each day to complete 
the program's requirements. In an effort to encourage students to utilize Study Island and Reading 
Eggs at home, we will be promoting a whole school goal and creating a school bulletin board to 
increase home/school technology usage. 

The Woburn Street School has established a Student Council this year. Mr. MacDonald and Mr. 
MacCrate meet regularly with the group of third grade students to work on school goals and 
community support programs. They have helped to coordinate Coats for Kids, Toys for Wilmington 
Children through the fire department and a school wide anti-bullying pledge. In the future months 
they will be working on a school wide Study Island goal. 

The Woburn Street School is fortunate to have a long and cooperative association with the Northside 
PAC. The PAC sponsors a variety of fundraising activities to generate money for programs and 
materials that benefit the school and enhance the curriculum. The PAC regularly provides 
enrichment programs for our students, as well as providing a variety of materials each year. The 
Woburn Street School is extremely grateful for the hard work and support of the PAC. 

BOUTWELL EARLY EDUCATION CENTER 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is a school dedicated to the education of young children. The 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center is fully staffed. It is a comprehensive early childhood site that is 
home to an Integrated Pre-school Classroom, a Substantially Separate Pre-school classroom, five 
Kindergarten Classrooms and the Bridge Program. In addition, the Boutwell houses an Extended 
Day Kindergarten Program (CARES). 

The Wilmington Public Schools is in its fifth year of full day Kindergarten at both Early Childhood 
sites. The program is five hours and fifteen minutes in duration daily. The children have a morning 
snack, lunch period and recess each day. The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is able to offer a 
multi-faceted learning experience to the students, which includes participation in physical education, 
music, art, library and computer lab. There is a Reading, Math and Science Program in place, which 
carries through to the elementary school. Special Education services are available for those students 
who qualify and need assistance in the areas of Speech and Language, Occupational Therapy, 
Physical Therapy and Resource Learning services. In addition, there is a Reading Specialist on staff 
at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center. The Reading Specialist focuses on reading support and 
enrichment to the Kindergarten students. 



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The Pre-school Program continues to be a half-day program, Monday through Thursday. The 
Integrated Pre-school Program has adopted the Pre-K component of the Houghton-Mifflin Reading 
Language Arts Series. It introduces pre-school students to the Alpha Friends, which is the 
cornerstone of the Reading Program. The children are also involved in many thematic units of study 
within the framework of the pre-school curriculum. Both the Pre-school and Kindergarten 
curriculums are aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. 

Student Progress Reports are submitted to parents in January and May, and reflect the Frameworks 
as well as curriculum initiatives. Math, pre and post, testing is completed on each Kindergarten 
student. The Dibels Benchmark Assessment is in its third year as a screening tool in the area of 
early literacy and is administered to each kindergarten student three times a year. The Houghton- 
Mifflin Reading/Language Arts Program and Trailblazer Math Program are firmly established in the 
Kindergarten curriculum. Our Kindergarten classes also maintain book buddies with West 
Intermediate students. The Harcourt Brace Science Program continues to be an integral part of the 
Kindergarten curriculum. The focus is on inquiry and exploration of the natural and physical world. 

The Boutwell Parent Advisory Council (PAC) has been a strong and involved presence at the 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center this year. Members of the PAC work closely with staff and 
administration. The enrichment programs funded by PAC, which included "Rising Stars", "Pioneer 
Living" and visiting authors, have greatly enhanced curriculum. PAC has brought families together 
with such events as, Movie Nights, Family Fun Night and the Ice Cream Social. Their contributions 
to the students and families, has been instrumental in developing a sense of community at the 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is another opportunity to involve parents. It includes 
representatives of parents, teachers and administrators from both the Boutwell and Wildwood 
Schools. Their charge is to develop a School Improvement Plan that is based on safety, security, 
curriculum and building initiatives. 

Two performances are held during the school year under the direction of our Music Specialist, Pre- 
school and Kindergarten staff. In January, a winter concert was presented to parents and friends. 
This year's theme was "Winter Fun." In April, parents were treated to a program that celebrates 
community. It is the culmination of a month long unit of study of the Town of Wilmington and the 
world around us. Activities that the children participated included visits by the Town Manager, Fire 
Chief, Police Chief, School Superintendent and Postmaster at a "Mini Town Meeting", held at the 
Middle School Auditorium. Our Pre-school holds two performances each year and hosts a 
"Grandparents Tea" each spring. It is yet another highlight of the school year! 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center continues to provide a positive and productive learning 
environment for its students, many of whom are experiencing public school for the first time. Our 
staff strives to create a balance between each child's social emotional development while at the same 
time cognizant of curriculum and instruction. With the support and involvement of our parents, we 
endeavor to make each child's school experience an enriching one that will lay the foundation for the 
years to come. 

WILDWOOD EARLY EDUCATION CENTER 

The Wildwood Early Childhood Center, located at 182 Wildwood Street, currently has an enrollment 
of 177 Kindergarten and pre-school students. This September, the Wildwood Early Childhood 
Center began the fifth year of full day Kindergarten after making a successful transition from half 
day Kindergarten in 2007. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center is presently comprised of seven 
full day Kindergarten classrooms as well as our Kindergarten Compass Program for students with 
special needs. The five hour and fifteen minute Kindergarten day allows our students to learn 
experientially and at a pace that is conducive to in-depth exploration of curriculum. The Wildwood 
also offers two pre-school programs. The integrated pre-school program is a half-day program with 
two sessions that run four days a week for two and a half hours a day. In addition, the Wildwood 
Early Childhood Center offers a full day pre-school for students with special needs that run for five 



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hours and fifteen minutes four days a week and three hours every Friday. Our pre-school and 
Kindergarten programs help build a foundation of skills and early development for our students. 
The Wildwood Early Childhood Center also houses the Wilmington Public Schools Special Education 
Department. 

All Kindergarten students at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center receive weekly art, music, 
library and computer time. Physical education classes are offered twice weekly. The Kindergarten 
library program at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center is currently coordinated and run by parent 
volunteers. Our pre school students also participate in library and computer time once a week. Both 
the library and computer programs at the pre-school level are run by parent volunteers. The 
inclusion of thirty minutes of designated computer time for every pre-school and Kindergarten 
classroom has enabled all of the early childhood students to interact directly with technology on a 
weekly basis which has been extremely beneficial to the facilitation of early technology skills for our 
pre-school and Kindergarten students. This year, the district purchased a web-based early literacy 
program, Reading Eggs, for Kindergarten students to utilize during their assigned computer time. 
The program has been a wonderful enhancement to the existing Kindergarten English Language Art 
curriculum. Lunches are served to all of our full day students on a daily basis. Special Education 
support services, such as Speech/Language Therapy, Resource/Learning Support, Occupational 
Therapy and Physical Therapy are available for students who are determined eligible through the 
Special Education Department. 



The Wildwood Early Childhood Center prides itself on 
being a student-centered educational facility, emphasizing 
individual student development, strong student-centered 
curriculum, family involvement and positive school 
climate. Central to our Kindergarten curriculum are the 
Houghton-Mifflin English Language Arts Program, which 
is also utilized in the pre-school and the Math Trailblazers 
Program. Both programs lay the foundation for student 
success across multiple curriculum areas. In 2008, the 
Kindergarten classrooms adopted the Harcourt Science 
Program. Through this hands-on science program, our 
Kindergarten students are encouraged to explore life, Kindergarten students Explore the Ocean. 

physical and earth science. The staff has worked 

diligently to align the science curriculum with our existing reading and math programs and they 
continue exploring additional ways and resources to most effectively teach science to early childhood 
students. In addition to the Kindergarten and pre-school adopted curriculum, we also invite various 
enrichment programs to visit the Wildwood Early Childhood Center throughout the year to enhance 
our existing programs. In an effort to support our Houghton-Mifflin Language Arts Program, closely 
monitor student progress and assist in guiding our literacy instruction to meet every student's 
individual needs, the DIBELS reading assessment was adopted at the beginning of the 2009-2010 
school year. The DIBELS reading assessment is a standardized reading assessment designed to 
gather baseline data on students and assist in the identification of individual student strengths and 
weaknesses in the area of literacy. Throughout the first two years of the DIBELS reading 
assessment adoption, curriculum improvement time at the early childhood level was devoted to 
training all pre-school and Kindergarten staff in administering the DIBELS assessment, analyzing 
the data gathered and learning how to best suit the needs of our early childhood students in the area 
of literacy. Now in our third year of using the DIBELS, staff members have become even more 
comfortable and knowledgeable in the use of this assessment instrument to monitor and support the 
diverse learners in their classrooms. The staff from early childhood programs across the district 
work together to design classroom and school activities that facilitate the acquisition or 21 st century 
skills that will prepare them for success in the future. Staff members work tirelessly through 
participation in district wide committees to keep our curriculum current and aligned with the 
standards adopted by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Classroom and center activities focus 
on age-appropriate literacy skills, phonemic awareness, mathematics, written language, science, 
social studies, technology integration and social skill development. Social and emotional 
development is an equally important facet of our curriculum in the pre-school and Kindergarten 
programs. Play and positive peer interactions are woven into every child's day. 




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Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is a combined committee of administrators, teachers and parents 
from the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers, who meet on a monthly basis to develop a 
school improvement plan for the early childhood centers and monitor the progress of outline goals for 
the year. The School Improvement Plan is a compilation of goals addressing the school's needs 
around learning results, professional development, facilities, community, technology and 
communication. 

Additionally, our parents put forth great interest and enthusiasm in all of their efforts to support our 
school through an active Wildwood Parent Advisory Council (PAC). PAC sponsors enrichment 
opportunities for our students that include field trips, materials for classrooms and the school, 
presentations and Family Fun Nights that help bring together the Wildwood Early Childhood Center 
community. 

In the spring, the Wildwood Early Childhood Center participates in a school-wide thematic unit that 
focuses on the Town of Wilmington. Through this Wilmington Unit, students learn about the 
community, landmarks and traditions of their hometown through activities designed to meet all 
areas of the curriculum. During our unit we also have a "mini Town Meeting" where various town 
officials come to our school and establish important relationships with our young students. Officer 
Moon, our safety officer, is a friendly face to all the children as he presents bus and community 
safety programs and Lt. Hurley, along with many other Wilmington fire fighters, bring important 
fire safety messages and programs to our Wildwood students. We are thankful to have such 
community involvement and support for the children at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center where 
our goal is to meet the needs of all our students in order for them to succeed and develop a life long 
love of learning. 

PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT 



Wilmington's Performing Arts department has been hard 
at work with their students making music and sharing it 
with the community. After a successful band camp this 
summer, the Wilmington Wildcat Band, led by Ms. 
Barbara Mette and Ms. Anita DiLullo, enjoyed a 
successful marching season, though a select few games 
had to be missed due to weather. Presently, the students 
are hard at work preparing for their Winter Concert on 
January 26. 




Meanwhile, the Strings Attached group, led by Mr. Ward " — mmM 

Dilmore, is busy preparing for their bi-annual trip to Lake George, NY after a successful trip to 
Austria last year. It is a particularly exciting year because we are in the process of hiring a new 
Strings instructor to assist Mr. Dilmore at the elementary and middle school levels. We look forward 
to watching the Strings program grow even more than it has over the last 10 years with additional 
staff. The WHS Lamplighters Drama Guild is hard at work preparing their annual musical, The 
Pajama Game, which opens Friday, January 13. They will also be participating in the Massachusetts 
Educational Theater Guild (METG) One Act Festival this spring performing an original, student- 
written work for the first time ever. 

At the elementary and middle school levels more exciting things are happening than ever as the 
format for some of our elementary concerts has been tweaked slightly and converted to 
"informances". Simply put, they are an opportunity for parents and family members to enter the 
classroom and witness a lesson being taught by the music teacher that culminates in a performance 
with that same class based on curricular standards. Ms. Mazzarino, Mrs. Rene, Mrs. Stolar and 
Mrs. Knoettner continue to set a high standard at the middle school for our young music students. 



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VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 



The Visual Arts Department had several major changes over the course of 2011, starting when Marie 
Shack, Wilmington High School Art and Visual Arts Department Liaison, and Suzette Durso, 
Wilmington High School Photo, retired this past June. Following their departure, Jennifer Fidler, 
Wilmington High School Graphic Design, was appointed as the new Visual Arts Department Liaison. 
Sara Sussman moved from the middle school program to take over the high school art classes and 
two new staff members were hired. Cara Wojcik joined Neal Roberts at the middle school and Daniel 
Fionte took over the high school photography program. 

Along with our new teachers, the entire Visual Arts Department has been hard at work with various 
projects. The high school teachers have been planning a Juried Art Show for January, with a gallery 
show planned for April at the Wilmington Arts Center. The middle school teachers continue to 
prepare students with a long-term sketchbook project in addition to various creative challenges, and 
our elementary staff has also continued to provide outstanding art education by developing a 
curriculum around the other disciplines being taught. For example, the Woburn Street School 
students presented an inspiring collection of artwork at last June's Art and Literature Night, an 
event that is sure to impress again this year. 

With such a successful start to the 2012 school year, the Wilmington Public Schools Visual Arts 
Department is looking forward to showcasing more student artwork around the schools and Town in 
the coming year. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

The Physical Education & Health Department continued to serve all students (K-12). 

The Elementary Physical Education and Health Education Program is a comprehensive curriculum 
which incorporates physical fitness and skill development components as well as specific health 
related topics. The Health Education at the second, third and fourth grade level emphasizes the 
importance of exercise, body systems, hygiene, proper nutrition, personal health care, sun protection, 
rest and sleep to feel well. The students learn to identify major behaviors that contribute to wellness 
through self-esteem, relationships, responsibility, communication and decision making skills. In 
fifth grade, we continue to offer the DARE Program in cooperation with the Wilmington Police 
Department and Officer Julie Pozzi. 

The Middle School Physical Education and Health Education program is a comprehensive 
curriculum which incorporates health topics, physical fitness and sport skill development for all 
students. A popular physical education unit includes the traverse climbing wall at the middle school 
gymnasium and the students continue to be extremely excited about using the climbing wall. The 
climbing wall enhances skills that build strength, endurance and coordination. A new physical 
education unit is "Yoga-tation" this combines yoga stretches with meditation exercises. In the 
Health Education class there is a new lesson within the safety unit which informs the students on 
the topic of an AED device. An AED is an Automatic External Defibrillator which is used to assist in 
the rescue of a person. On September 30, 2011 the entire middle school student body and staff 
participated in team building activity day that enhanced positive relationships among their school 
community. At this team building day the students and staff participated in team building physical 
activities. In addition, the staff presented the first Second Step lesson for this year to the students 
which included Understanding the Problem with the theme of what is interpersonal conflict. The 
third activity on this day was a book discussion group related to their summer reading assignment. 
The day was wonderful and enjoyed by everyone at the Wilmington Middle School. 

The Physical Education Curriculum at the high school, Health Dynamics, is a comprehensive 
program dealing with health, fitness and life skills. Students will examine appropriate health topics 
including substance abuse, nutrition, physical fitness, human sexuality, mental health and stress 
management. The curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, consumer issues, ecology 
and social issues in the program. Related physical activities designed to reinforce health issues will 
be offered to ensure a complete holistic sense of mental, spiritual and physical well-being. 



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ATHLETIC DEPARMENT 



The Health Dynamics Department cited several students for Outstanding Achievement in 2011: 
Academic Excellence Awards were presented to the following students: 



Class of 2014 
Class of 2013 
Class of 2012 
Class of 2011 



Jessica Marciello 
Wayne Huynh 
Jennifer Stewart 
Tori Lord 



Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 



Rachel Grabar 
Cole Peffer 
Katelyn Richardson 
Sydnee Russo 
Stephanie Tran 

Athletic Award Recipients 



Dr. Gerald Fagan Award "To the most outstanding Wilmington High School Senior Athlete": 
Sean Hanley and Amanda Keane 

Lawrence H. Cushing, Sr. Award "To the senior demonstrating dedication to athletics at 
Wilmington High School": John Malone and Katherine Aoki 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award "To the senior athlete demonstrating dedication to athletics while 
attending Wilmington High School": Kevin Mitchell and Elizabeth Jaeschke 

Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Memorial Scholarship "To the senior athlete demonstrating courage, 
discipline and tenacity while attending Wilmington High School": Ryan Woods and Taylor 
Hanley 

Jack Wolfe Memorial Scholarship "To the male and female athlete who exhibit team spirit, 
leadership and equal dedication to academics as well as athletics": Nick Godzyk, Amanda Keane 
and Kevin Mitchell 

Dick Scanlon Scholarship: Christopher Frissore and Heather Kealos 
The Wildcat Distinguished Service Award: Dan McConologue 



Athletic Department Highlights of 2011 

The Boys Basketball team, coached by Head Coach Joe Maiella, had an overall record of 
17-3. They were co-champs in the GAL Large Division. They lost in the State Division II Quarter 
Final to Winchester. Vinny Scifo was a CAL All League and Lowell Sun All Star. Tim McCarthy was 
a CAL All League player and Nick Godzyk was named CAL All Star. Joe Maiella was the CAL Coach 
of the Year and also the MBCA (Massachusetts Basketball Coaches Association) Coach of the Year. 



The Girls Basketball team, coached by Jay Keane, had a record of 12-10. The team finished third in 
the CAL Large Division. They lost in the State Division II Quarter Final to North Andover. 
Amanda Keane was named a CAL All League and Lowell Sun All Star. Maggie Brown was CAL All 
Star. 



The Boys Ice Hockey team, coached by Stephen Scanlon, had a record of 18-3-2. They finished first 
in the CAL for their tenth League Championship. They lost in the semi-finals of the Division II 
State Tournament to Saugus. Cam Owens and Brian Hurley were both named CAL All League and 
Lowell Sun All Star. Joe Aucoin was a CAL All League player. John Malone and Andy Owens were 
CAL All Stars. 



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The Girls Ice Hockey team, coached by Joe McMahon, had Michaela McLaughlin named to the 
Greater Boston League/Merrimack Valley Conference (GBL/MVC) All Conference team. Chloe 
Castellano, Megan Pickett and Jane Farrell were named to the GBL/MVC All Star team. 

Our Boys Winter Track team, coached by Michael Kinney, had Nathan Downs named to the Lowell 
Sun All Star team. 

The Baseball team, coached by Aldo Caira, lost in the first round of the State Tournament to 
Beverly. Vinny Scifo was a CAL All League player. Dalton Rolli and Sean Hanley were named to 
the CAL All Star team. 

Our Softball team, coached by Audrey Cabral-Pini, finished first in the CAL Large Division and had 
an overall record of 13-7. They lost in the first round of the State Tournament to Tewksbury. Emily 
Crannell and Lauren Zaremba were named to the CAL All League team. CAL All Stars were Tori 
Lord, Taylor Hanley and Jackie Kennedy. 

The Boys Spring Track team, coached by Michael Kinney, finished with an overall record of 5-5. 
Nathan Downs was a CAL All League performer in the Long Jump. 

In the fall 2011, Wilmington High School entered the Middlesex League. 

The Girls Cross Country team, coached by Thomas Bradley, had an overall record of 4-3. Callie 
O'Connell was a Middlesex League and Lowell Sun Ail-Star. 

The Boys Soccer team, coached by Stephen Scanlon, had an overall record of 6-6-6. They lost in the 
first round of the State Tournament to Stoneham. Colin Doherty, Phil Lentini and James Mara were 
named to the Middlesex League All Star team. 

The Girls Soccer team, coached by Sue Hendee, had an overall record of 10-4-4. The girls finished 
first in the Middlesex League All Star team as Co-Champs with Stoneham. They lost in the first 
round of the Tournament in double overtime to Arlington. Holly Niemiec, Kaitlyn Curley, Kelly 
Hartsough and Rachel Grabar were named to the Middlesex League All Star team. 

Our Golf team, coached by Steve Lynch, had a league record of 4-1. John Keough was a Lowell Sun 
All Star. 

Field Hockey, coached by Jodi Campbell, had an overall record of 12-4-2 and finished second in the 
Middlesex League Small Division. They lost in the second round of the State Tournament to 
Belmont. Courtney Cavanaugh and Shelley Sullivan were Middlesex League All League players. 

The Football team, coached by Mike Barry, had an overall record of 6-4. They finished second in the 
Middlesex League Small Division behind Wakefield. John Parsons was named to the Middlesex 
League and Lowell Sun All Star teams. He was also the MVP of the Middlesex League Small 
Division and a Boston Globe All Scholastic. Matt Ferreira and Alex Furlong were also named to the 
Middlesex All Star team. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last academic year, the Special Education Department received 150 referrals for initial 
Team evaluations and provided special education and related treatment services to 654 eligible 
students. 

During the last academic year, the Special Education Department expanded its capacity to provide 
services to medically fragile children by opening the REACH Program located at the Shawsheen 
Elementary School for students in grades 1-3. 



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In a continuing effort to provide staff training for faculty and related service providers the Special 
Education Department has supported numerous workshops and conferences on topics such as, 
bullying prevention, mental health issues, assessment, technology, math, English language arts, 
applied behavior analysis, federal & state regulations, legal issues, basic rights and home-school 
communication. 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Wilmington School Food Service employs 16 full-time and 24 part-time staff, in addition to the Food 
Service Secretary and the Administrator of Food Services. All salaries, food, supply and equipment 
purchases, as well as most maintenance costs and office supplies are paid from the Food Service 
revolving account. Revenues obtained from student lunch participation, reimbursement from the 
Department of Education, catering, Senior Citizen Lunch, Extended Day Care and other programs 
are used solely for the support and improvement of the School Food Service Program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture's food based menu-planning system 
and nutrient standards, providing meals that meet 1/3 of the RDA for calories, as well as required 
levels of other key nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, protein, vitamins A & C, iron and calcium. 
Lunch prices for the 2011/2012 school year are as follows: $1.75 at the elementary schools. The 
middle school is $2.00 and the high school is $2.00-2.50. A total of 376,037 student meals were 
served last school year. Students may choose from a variety of lunch options at all grade levels to 
encourage participation. Average monthly participation was approximately 65 percent district-wide. 
In addition to reimbursable meals, a la carte items are available to students to supplement school 
lunches and those brought from home. A variety of fruits and vegetables are served daily, up to 14 
different choices, many of which are fresh fruits and vegetables. 

Allergy and other health concerns continue to be addressed. Full-time food service employees are 
trained annually in EPI-PEN administration. Cafeteria managers at each school and the 
Administrator of Food Service, work closely with school nurses and parents, providing ingredient 
and nutrient information as necessary. At present, there are 42 ServSafe certified sanitarians on 
staff including the administrator and food service secretary. All staff have been trained on kitchen 
safety issues, such as lifting, slips and falls. All managers and the administrator have completed an 
allergy awareness certification. 

The food service program continually conducts promotions to increase students' participation in 
lunch, including "Fourth Grade Corn Shucking Day", "Superbowl", "Opening Day" and "Gobble 
Gobble Day". 

Computerized Point-of-Sale systems are in place at all schools to improve the efficiency and accuracy 
of reporting and accounting. Participation, especially of students eligible for free and reduced price 
meals, has increased remarkably since this program was introduced and online services are now also 
available. Other initiatives completed during the school year include various equipment and storage 
facility improvements and the purchase of a new steamer and kettle for Wilmington Middle School, 
two new ovens for the high school and Woburn Street School. We also installed a carbon monoxide 
detection system for the Woburn Street School kitchen. 

From July 2010 through June 2011, the senior citizen home-delivered meals program at the West 
Intermediate School served 10,499 lunches. 

WILMINGTON CARES 

Children's Art, Recreation and Enrichment Services 

The CARES Program continues its commitment to provide a safe and enriching environment for 
Wilmington children before and after regular school hours. In addition, we offer vacation programs 
for children in grades K-5 from 7:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. during the February and April breaks as well 
as approximately seven weeks during the summer months. These programs continue to grow as the 
need for our services increases and the word gets out that CARES is the place to be! 



-106- 



We are currently gearing up for February break at the Woburn Street School, during which our 
qualified staff will enjoy the company of approximately 100 of our local youth each day. The children 
will enjoy activities throughout the week facilitated by our professional staff. There are always 
special trips and activities planned during vacations. In addition, we can all look forward to some 
good 'ole American fun including, sledding (if we get any snow), basketball and a good game of Crazy 
8's. The activities are diverse, so as to appeal to children of all age levels and interests. We strive 
for a balance of physical activities, the arts and cognitive challenges. We will be playing team sports, 
designing our own crafts and exploring the computers. 

CONCLUSION 

Wilmington Public Schools had several retirees this past year, many who gave the school system 
over 25 years of service: Marilyn Allard, Sandra Dumont, Suzette Durso, Marlaine Mahady-Potter, 
Barbara McDevitt, Paula M. Samatis, Janet Senesi, Marie Shack and Cheryl Soderquist. These staff 
members have been an integral part of the Wilmington Public Schools. They have given of 
themselves to support, nurture and teach our students. We would like to wish them many happy 
and healthful retirement years. 

Our sincere thanks to Town Manager Michael Caira and his senior management staff for their 
consistent support of the public schools. The school department is proud of the collaborative efforts 
and bonds that have been formed with the Town and we are most appreciative that the Town 
continues its longstanding commitment to supporting its schools so that they can function as 
learning communities. 



-107- 



Lastly, the school department would be remiss if we did not acknowledge the upcoming retirement of 
Town Manager Michael Caira. In 1910, Theodore Roosevelt gave a speech entitled Citizenship in a 
Republic . There is a passage in the speech that could easily have been written about Mr. Caira. 

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or 
where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is 
actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives 
valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without 
error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great 
enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best 
knows in the end the triumph of high achievement..." 

Thank you Mr. Caira for being that man and for lavishing your gifts on the Wilmington Public 
Schools. You have left your imprint on all of us. 

SHAWSHEEN VALLEY REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District is pleased to submit its 2011 
Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington. Located 
on Cook Street in Billerica next to the towns of Burlington and Wilmington, the school celebrated its 
41st anniversary this year, perpetuating the highest quality in vocational technical education to area 
youth and residents. 

The representatives of the 10 member Regional School Committee that governs the District are: 
Donald Drouin, Secretary, and Glenn Mclntyre from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum and Paula 
McShane Lambert, Treasurer, from Billerica; Paul V. Gedick, Chairman, and Robert Gallagher from 
Burlington; J. Peter Downing and Patricia W. Meuse from Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis and 
Robert G. Peterson, Vice Chairman, from Wilmington. Charles Lyons has been 
Superintendent/Director of the District since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School (SVTHS) is one of 26 regional vocational technical school 
districts in Massachusetts. One thousand three hundred forty-six (1,346) high school students were 
enrolled in SVTHS's day school programs in October of 2011 and more than 400 adults participated 
in the school's various adult and continuing education courses. 

In June of 2011, SVTHS graduated 324 seniors. Over 70% of the graduates planned to attend college 
or other post secondary schooling in the fall. Twenty percent of the students intended to continue 
working in their trade with another 11% working in another field after graduation. In addition, 2% 
entered the armed forces. 

The SVTHS faculty is an exceptional group of talented academic and vocational/technical educators 
who are highly qualified to teach in their respective disciplines and occupational areas. SVTHS 
employs 135 full-time teachers as well as 18 para-professionals. Of those full-time teachers, ten are 
department chairs and 15 are lead teachers. All SVTHS teachers exhibit the character, health, 
personality and professional competency worthy of serving the needs of District students. 

Academic Programs 

MCAS Performance: In the spring of 2011, the 321 sophomores comprising SVTHS' Class of 2013 
distinguished themselves among all other vocational/technical high school students, among all 
sophomores within the five town district and, most impressively, among all sophomores throughout 
the Commonwealth, earning a special commendation from the Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education (DESE) in the latter analysis. 



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With only one exception, SVTHS sophomores outperformed all other vocational/technical sophomores 
on all MCAS performance measures (English Language Arts, Mathematics and Science/Technology/ 
Engineering) during the 2011 test period. 

The District analysis paralleled the vocational analysis. With the exception of Wilmington 
(Mathematics only), SVTHS sophomores outscored or equaled all of their District peers on the three 
performance measures. Table 1 identifies the percent of District students who scored at or above the 
Proficiency level in each of the three MCAS test areas. 



TABLE 1. PERCENT OF TENTH GRADERS SCORING IN EITHER THE ADVANCED OR 
PROFICIENT RANGE IN SPRING 2011 MCAS TESTING 




Bedford 


Billerica 


Burlington 


Tewksbury 


SVTHS 


Wilmington 


English 


96.8 


96.5 


98.4 


95.7 


98.5 


98 


Mathematics 


94.7 


93.2 


96.2 


92.4 


95.4 


95.9 


Science/Tech/Eng 


94.9 


92.8 


90.4 


90.3 


95.2 


90.4 



Although remarkable, both the vocational/technical and District analyses pale statistically to 
SVTHS' pre-eminent performance throughout the Commonwealth with respect to a rank ordering of 
Median Student Growth Percentiles (MSGP). The MSGP is a statistical measure of student growth 
between grades eight and ten. In the spring of 2011, SVTHS ranked fifth among the 297 school 
districts for which the DESE reported tenth grade MCAS scores. This extraordinary achievement 
earned SVTHS a special commendation from the DESE for a third consecutive year. Table 2 
identifies District Median Growth Percentiles for District students in English Language Arts and 
Mathematics. 



TABLE 2. MEDIAN STUDENT GROWTH PERCENTILE SCORES IN SPRING 2011 
MCAS TESTING 





Bedford 


Billerica 


Burlington 


Tewksbury 


SVTHS 


Wilmington 


English 


55 


39 


62.5 


42 


83 


55 


Mathematics 


61 


44 


54 


67 


70.5 


51 


Science/Tech/Eng 


NA 


NA 


NA 


NA 


NA 


NA 



Note: The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education calculates MSGP only for English 
Language Arts and Mathematics, the two test areas that determine a schools' Adequate Yearly 
Progress (AYP.) 



Curriculum Revision: In response to the curriculum change promulgated by the Massachusetts Core 
Curriculum, the design and sequence of course offerings at SVTHS are changing to support earlier 
access to College Preparatory Mathematics courses. The revision takes effect in the fall of 2011 and 
will become an ongoing project during the next four years as the class of 2015, the first group 
affected by the Core Curriculum provisions, progresses through grades 9-12. College Preparatory 
Algebra I, Level 2, which was designed cooperatively by a team of regular and special education 
faculty throughout the 2010-2011 school year, was implemented in the fall of 2011. College 
Preparatory Geometry, Level 2 is scheduled for implementation in the fall of 2012 and College 
Preparatory Algebra II, Level 2 in the fall of 2013. 

New Staff: In the fall, Anne DeMarco, a seven year veteran from Billerica Memorial High School, 
joined the Mathematics Department to fill the vacancy created by the retirement of James Byrnes. 
Kimberly Canadas, a Shawsheen alum and six year veteran from Northeast Metro Vocational High 
School, also joined Shawsheen's Mathematics Department. 

Summer School: In the summer of 2011, the SVTHS Summer Program enrolled 119 students from 
ten surrounding school systems in 22 courses offered to students in grades 7-10. All courses were on- 
site, face-to-face offerings that provided the frequency and depth of teacher interaction necessary 
and predictable for students attempting to recover credit for courses that they previously failed. 
Individuals seeking summer school information should contact Dr. Robert Kanellas, Director of 
Academic Programs, at 978-671-3640 or Mr. Kevin Bloom, Summer Coordinator, at 978-671-3631. 



-109- 



Infrastructure Renovations: The completion of SVTHS' state-of-the-art Life Science wing and the 
migration of the Health program to that new facility made available to academic programs three 
rooms previously occupied by the Health shop in the school's mall area. Extensive summer 
renovations to those rooms converted a small Health lab to a larger academic Science lab. A second 
area was converted to a science classroom and a third area became a social studies classroom. In 
addition to these changes, installation of ceiling-mounted LED projectors, interactive white boards 
and mimio technology continued throughout the building. 

Clubs and Organizations 

Classes: A yearlong series of successful social events and thoughtfully devised fundraisers, which 
included initiatives to raise supplies for American soldiers in war zones, each of the four classes 
culminated the year with memorable formal and semi-formal events. Under the direction of their 
advisor, Angela Caira, the senior class planned and enjoyed an elegant senior prom at the Westin 
Waltham Hotel. Junior class advisor, Stacy LaBella, and her junior class officers planned and held a 
gala prom at the Crestview in Woburn. The sophomore class, advised by Marygrace Ferrari, and the 
freshman class, advised by Jay Tildsley and Greg Bendel, collaborated on the annual Spring Fling 
semi-formal, which was held at the school. 

The 12th Annual Shawsheen Turkey Bowl, the much anticipated flag-football game between the 
junior and senior girls, was once again a successful holiday event which raised significant donations 
of cash and food for the Billerica Food Pantry. 

Literary Magazine: For the fourth consecutive year, Shawsheen's literary magazine, Ramblings, 
received awards for excellence by a major educational organization, including the New England 
Scholastic Press Association (NESPA) affiliated with Boston University's College of Communication, 
the National Council of Teachers of English and the Columbia University Scholastic Press 
Association. These distinguished awards recognize the special talents of the SVTHS students who 
supplied the content and designed the layout of the annual publication under the supervision of Mrs. 
Leah Marquis of the English Department and Mr. Doug Michaud of the Technical 
Illustration/Commercial Art shop. 

School Newspaper: In a model school-wide collaborative effort, Mrs. Leah Marquis of the English 
Department, Mr. Doug Michaud of the Technical Illustration shop and Messrs. Tim Broadrick and 
Tom Struthers of the Graphic Arts shop again produced quarterly editions of the Rampage that 
presented the school year's major events in artistic design and thoughtful narrative. 

National Honor Society: Under the advisorship of Mrs. Gail Poulten of the English Department, the 
SVTHS chapter of the National Honor Society inducted 39 eleventh and twelfth graders in March of 
2011. Superintendent Charles Lyons was the guest speaker at the induction ceremony. Throughout 
the year, members of the Honor Society thoughtfully and enthusiastically participated in a broad 
array of community service and they traveled to Newport, RI and Salem, MA to visit cultural and 
historic sites. 

Student Council: The Student Council, under the direction of faculty advisor Ms. Ellen Mountain, 
continued its energetic paper recycling program throughout the year. In 2011, Ms. Mountain 
continued the Council's recently expanded efforts to recycle plastic, toner cartridges, cell phones and 
sneakers. 

The Traveling Rams: Throughout the spring, club advisor Kristin Sciacca and approximately 40 
Shawsheen students initiated plans for a trip to Italy scheduled for April of 2012. Interested world 
travelers or their parents should contact Ms. Sciacca at 978-667-2111 x577 or 
ksciacca@shawsheen.tec.ma.us. 

Oratory Club: Coached by faculty advisor, Mrs. Leah Marquis of the English Department, Anne 
Whitehouse, a 12 th grade Internet Technology student from Tewksbury, placed first at the district 
(Post 2597 of Pinehurst), state and regional levels in the Voice of Democracy Speech Contest 
sponsored by Veterans of Foreign Wars. Anne's extraordinary accomplishment earned her a trip to 
the national competition in Washington, DC, where she and the other elite qualifiers met President 
Obama. 



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Robotics Club: For a second consecutive year, the Robotics Club captured first place at the annual 
Trebuchet tournament, which was hosted most recently by Windham High School in New 
Hampshire. Later in the year, the club finished second in the First Tech Challenge (FTC) regional 
qualifier and sixth, of approximately 35 teams from New England, New York and Canada, at the 
FTC championship tournament. 

Mathematics Club and Science Club: New in 2010 to the diverse array of after school activities 
offered by SVTHS were two academic co-curricular clubs, the Mathematics Club, advised by Debra 
Dew of the Mathematics Department, and the Science Club, advised by Angel Hardy of the Science 
Department. In its inaugural year, the Mathematics Club practiced for, and participated in, not only 
a series of competitions hosted by district schools but also a special invitational competition 
sponsored and hosted by Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In its inaugural year, the Science Club 
participated in after school activities that broadened participants' understanding of scientific theory 
and applications. Mathematics enthusiasts should contact Ms. Dew at ddew@shawsheen.tec.ma.us ; 
science enthusiasts should contact Ms. Hardy at ahardy@shawsheen.tec.ma. us . 

Outdoor Club and Ski Club: New in 2010 to SVTHS' recreational, extra-curricular options were the 
Outdoor Club and the Ski Club. The former group, advised by Jessica Cook of the Social Studies 
Department, planned six overnight climbs of Mount Washington in New Hampshire. The latter 
group, co-advised by Kelly McFadden of the Guidance Department and Doug Michaud of the 
Technical Illustration Shop, planned a series of after school ski trips to the Nashoba Valley Ski Area 
in Westford, MA. Interested mountain climbers should contact Ms. Cook at 

icook@shawsheen.tec.ma.us . and interested skiers or boarders of any experience level should contact 
Ms. McFadden at kmacfadden@shawsheen.tec.ma.us or Mr. Michaud at 
dmichaud@shawsheen. tec, ma. us . 

Parent Advisory Council: Once again, graduation day culminated in a well-attended all-night party 
sponsored and organized by the SVTHS Parent Advisory Council under the direction of its faculty 
advisor, Mr. Ronald Fusco, and its chair and SVTHS alumna, Mrs. Robin Sgrosso. 

Alumni Association: Under the direction of its planning committee and faculty advisor, Mrs. Gail 
Poulten, the Alumni Association vetted nominations, selected honorees and hosted an Alumni Hall of 
Fame induction at the Tewksbury Country Club. Any SVTHS alumni interested in planning future 
events with Mrs. Poulten should contact her at gpoulten@shawsheen.tec.ma.us or 978-667-2111 
x584. 

Support Services 

The SVTHS Support Services Department services the fourth largest population of students with 
special needs in Vocational Education within Massachusetts, approximately 320 students. The most 
frequently occurring area of need is the category of Specific Learning Disability which reflects that 
many students have a history of academic difficulties upon their arrival at Shawsheen. 
Nevertheless, SVTHS has had a strong track graduation rate of this group of students with 94.3% 
graduating in June, 2010. This compares to a state average of 64 percent for special needs students. 

Shawsheen's success on the MCAS has continued as a result of a "team" effort on the part of 
Academic, Vocational/Technical and Support Services staff to address the needs of our Special 
Education population. Although over 24 percent of SVTHS students are diagnosed with special 
needs, the school's rate of either Advanced or Proficient MCAS scores exceeded 90 percent on English 
Language Arts, Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry. 

The Support Services staff has continued with extensive training to support the IEP process and the 
identification of disabilities for our special needs population based on federal and state guidelines. 
Shawsheen adopted eSped software to write Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) and supporting 
documentation. Staff training continues to occur to utilize updates to this software for IEP 
development. In addition, the Support Services Department continues to implement various forms of 
technology that allow for equal access to the curriculum for all learners. Finally, support services 
staff has been involved with implementing Shawsheen's anti-bullying plan. One component consists 
of a social skills group for students who were identified to be vulnerable to such behavior. 

-Ill- 



Athletics 



The year 2011 was a memorable year for Shawsheen's Athletics, with over 450 Shawsheen students 
participating in interscholastic athletics. The Rams earned 12 league championships and four state 
vocational titles. 

The overall winning percentage of the varsity teams, 14 of whom qualified for post-season play, 
ranked among the highest in school history. Dozens of students were honored with All-Star 
recognition by the Commonwealth Athletic Conference and the Lowell Sun. Wrestler Ryan Cassidy 
was named to the All Scholastic Wrestling team by the Boston Herald. 

For an unprecedented ninth time in ten years, SVTHS has earned the Markham Award from the 
Boston Globe for the most outstanding vocational technical high school program in Massachusetts. 
The award is a reflection of the commitment and talent of all those associated with the SVTHS 
athletic program. 

Community Services 

Adult Evening School: The Adult Evening School offered a wide variety of vocational/technical 
courses for adults interested in expanding their knowledge and skills. Courses are offered during 
both the fall and winter semesters, with enrollment exceeding five hundred adult learners during the 
past year. Interested residents should contact Ms. Carissa Karakaedos, Director of Community 
Services, at (978) 671-3607 for information and/or a brochure. 

School of Practical Nursing: The 2010-2011 year graduated 32 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN). 
Since its inception, a total of 563 students have successfully continued on to a rewarding career as 
Licensed Practical Nurses. This intense ten-month program offers a combination of evening and 
weekend coursework and clinical externship experiences. Preparation for the state LPN exam is also 
included. Residents interested in applying to the LPN program are urged to contact the Director of 
the School of Practical Nursing, Ms. Patricia Noonan, at (978) 671-3646. 

Project Explore: Nearly 450 middle school students from the District participated in after school 
career awareness activities during the 2011 winter semester. Students explored a variety of career 
path options. This program is coordinated with area middle school guidance counselors. The 
program is free of charge. Busing is provided by SVTHS. For registration materials or general 
information, interested residents should contact Ms. Carissa Karakaedos at 978-671-3607. 

Swim Program: SVTHS energetically continued its water aerobics, lap swim, parent-and-me swim 
class and swim lessons during the 2010-2011 year. The Shawsheen's pool also continues to serve as 
the home site for interscholastic high school swim teams from Billerica, Bedford and Burlington 
public schools. Individuals seeking swim program information should contact Ms. Jill Branley, 
Aquatic Director, at (978) 671-3699. 

Billerica House of Correction: The Billerica House of Correction's (BHOC) Education Director leads 
all prison education initiatives beyond the already established Culinary Arts program and the 10- 
Hour General Industry OSHA course. SVTHS continues to collaborate through the Director of 
Community Services, Carissa Karakaedos, with BHOC to expand its educational goals to inmates. 
SVTHS looks forward to maintaining its relationship with BHOC by providing technical assistance 
and end-of-course assessment services that will validate inmate achievement of course objectives. 

Middlesex Community College: SVTHS continued its partnership with the Hospitality Management 
Department of Middlesex Community College to deliver four courses at Shawsheen Tech as part of 
the requirements for its Culinary Arts Certificate or Associates in Science Degree option. Student 
enrollment was strong in 2011 and the program received exemplary student evaluations. 
Discussions to expand technical course offerings are currently being explored by the MCC 
Hospitality Dean and SVTHS Director of Community Services, Ms. Carissa Karakaedos. 



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Computer Services 

During the 2011 year, Computer Services completed all DESE data collection requirements. These 
reports included Student Information Management System (SIMS) data, Education Personnel 
Information Management System (EPIMS) data, Student Course Schedule (SCS) data, School Safety 
and Discipline Report (SSDR) data, the Technology Report data and the Vocational Technical 
Competency Tracking System (VTCTS) data. 

Computer Services requested all staff to use iPass rankbook since its implementation the year 
before. iPass rankbook allows teachers to keep a grade book and share their students' progress with 
parents through Parent Access Manager. 

In the fall, Computer Services added the current ninth grade population (class of 2015) to the Parent 
Access Manager System, bringing parent participation to approximately 80 percent. The Parent 
Access Manager allows parents to view up-to-date information on their children in the areas of 
attendance, grades, rankbook, schedules and discipline information. 

The computer labs for Graphic Arts, Design & Visual Communications, Machine Shop, Mathematics 
Lab, Room 500, Room 501 and Room 504 received upgrades during 2011. In each area, computers 
were replaced with the latest models. 

Computer Services continues to maintain its virtualized server solution to run a more energy 
efficient infrastructure. Wireless networking infrastructure was installed in the Life Science Wing 
and will be extended to the remaining portion of the building as part of a long term plan. 

Office 2010 has been installed on 85% of the computers that are capable of receiving the upgrade. 
Additional Office 2010 licenses will be purchased in preparation for the remaining computer 
upgrades. 

Guidance 

Admissions: Applications once again exceeded 600 for 350 seats in the class of 2015. This year, 
presentations occurred in all the Billerica, Wilmington, Tewksbury, Bedford and Burlington middle 
schools. Students, parents and community members were invited to events on-site including the 
Community Open House in November and the 8th Grade Career Night in January. 

9 th Grade Orientation: The Class of 2015 participated in SVTHS 9 th grade orientation program, 
Fresh Start. This exceptional program, which is in its second year, gave new students an 
opportunity to meet each other and become familiar with the school, its programs and staff through 
an interactive and fun day of events. Since the Guidance Department implemented the freshman 
transition program in 2006, with the support of the superintendent and school committee, 
attendance has continued to improve and withdrawals have decreased substantially. A mentoring 
program to help with transition was implemented using the same student leaders who helped deliver 
the orientation day. 

College and Career Planning: Shawsheen students continue to expand their options and 
opportunities after graduation. Studies conducted this year show a growing trend for SVTHS 
students to attend and remain at four-year colleges and universities. In addition, SVTHS met 
federal benchmarks this year for graduates in all programs. This included positive placement in 
employment, college and military careers. SVTHS offered preparatory programs for both Accuplacer 
and SAT college exams. Over 75 percent of the senior class participated in one or the other. SVTHS 
continues to offer a foreign language to students pursuing college programs that have this 
requirement. The course is offered after school and evenings. The college fair this year included 
over 70 colleges and universities and a special workshop was offered to students with special 
education needs to understand their options for post secondary learning. Over 500 students and 
parents participated in this largest-to-date event. 



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Scholarships and Awards: Despite the tough economy, SVTHS students were awarded over $88,000 
in scholarship funds. A graduate was also the recipient of the Massachusetts Vocational Association 
scholarship award. 

Cooperative Education Program: Cooperative education built momentum this fall with many of the 
vocational/technical programs increasing cooperative education placement by 50 percent or more. 
The trend continues as the placement office has currently secured cooperative education positions for 
more than 145 students. 

Student Health: Completed state mandate to do BMI testing on all 10 th graders. We fall in the same 
category as surrounding schools. 

School Council 

An important agency of school governance, the 2011-2012 SVTHS School Council, is made up of 
parents, Susan Berry from Billerica, JoAnn Brace from Tewksbury and Gayle Razzaboni from 
Billerica; community members, Bob Lazott of Billerica, Jean Perry of Burlington and Cosmo 
Ciccariello of Burlington; two SVTHS students, Mikayla Radcliff and Jennie Galante; faculty 
members, Robert Roach and Jason Tildsley; and co-chair Dr. Robert Cunningham, Assistant 
Superintendent-Director/Principal. 

The three primary functions of the School Council are to meet with the Superintendent/Director 
when he presents the school budget, make additions and revisions to the SVTHS Student Handbook 
and develop the annual School Improvement Plan. 

Technical Programs 

Skills USA: Skills USA is a national non-profit organization preparing students for careers in trade, 
technology and skilled service occupations. SVTHS earned 85 medals at the 2011 district 
competition and 38 medals at the state competition, including 16 gold medals. Twenty-one SVTHS 
students went on to the national competition in Kansas City, MO with all of the students placing no 
lower than seventh place. Medical Assisting earned a Gold Medal, while Web Design finished second 
and Occupational Health & Safety finished a strong third. 

Business Professionals of America: Business Professionals of America (BPA) is a national career and 
technical student organization composed of state associations and local chapters serving members 
who are pursuing or planning careers in business and information technology occupations. BPA 
provides opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and to grow personally and 
professionally while utilizing career related competencies. Involvement in BPA enhances social 
awareness, civic responsibility and business communication skills. Twenty-eight SVTHS students 
earned rewards at the state level and sent seven students to the nationals where one student was 
elected as the national treasurer and two other competitors finished in the top ten. 

National Accreditation: SVTHS has 19 vocational programs, eight of which are nationally accredited 
by their respective industries. The programs include: Automotive Technology, Autobody, Machine 
Technology, Metal Fabrication, Culinary Arts, Graphic Communication, Drafting Technology and 
Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. 

Transportation Cluster 

Automotive Technology: The program embarked on several post secondary career days and industry 
field trips, exposing students to career opportunities and new technologies in the field. Field trips 
included: Mass Bay Community College, Universal Technical Institute and New England Institute 
of Technology. A $2,100 tool box cash award was donated from Lowes for SVTHS' 100% 
participation in SkillsUSA. Through the capital budget process, the program acquired a new 
technologically advanced Hunter high-speed GSP9700 wheel balancer. 



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Autobody: The Autobody program continues to do an outstanding job repairing automobiles in need 
of body work for people throughout the district. A contract was signed with the State Police 
providing additional live work on police cars. Through the capital budget, a new paint mixing room 
and a ramp for the paint spray booth have been constructed in the shop. 

Service Cluster 

Health Service and Technology: The Health Services & Technology program is preparing for a new 
location and expansion into three Chapter 74 programs: Medical and Laboratory Assisting, Health 
Assisting and Dental Assisting. These three programs will encompass the new Life Science Wing in 
the fall of 2011. Curriculum revisions were proposed to align each program with the VTEFs and an 
equipment list was generated. Career awareness was expanded to include the field of biotechnology 
through a job shadow day at Millipore Systems for grade 10 students coordinated with MassBioEd. 
The program also continues to expand its clinical affiliates, having recently added Woodbriar of 
Wilmington and Sunny Acres Nursing & Rehabilitation of Chelmsford. A strong partnership with 
Saints Medical Center led to another successful community blood drive at the school, collecting more 
than 40 units of blood. All 26 seniors successfully passed the Massachusetts Nurse Aide State 
Examination, directly and positively impacting job placements. Christine O'Brien won a gold medal 
at the National SkillsUSA conference in Medical Assisting. 

Culinary Arts: The Culinary Arts department visited several post secondary career days, exposing 
students to career opportunities. Field trips included: Lincoln Institute in Hartford, Connecticut 
and The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Craft Advisory member, Ruben 
Arroco from Culinary Artworks, came into the shop and demonstrated some incredible fruit carving 
techniques and skills to the students. 

Cosmetology: The Cosmetology program began the school year with technology improvements to the 
theory classroom that included an LCD projector and two large white boards. With counsel from the 
Advisory Committee, Cosmetology continues to modernize student kits, work stations, supplies, tools 
and equipment. A record number of students participated in SkillsUSA, in which 12 students 
competed at the district level resulting in two silver medals. The two medalists continued to the 
state level resulting in another silver medal. The program took their annual field trip to Catherine 
Hinds Institute of Esthetics, and continued to be involved with the community, volunteering at local 
assisted living facilities. Fourteen out of eighteen seniors graduated with a Cosmetology license 
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and six secured co-op positions in local hair salons. 

Construction Cluster 

Carpentry, Plumbing, Electrical, Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration and 
Masonry: Construction projects within the community continue to be a large part of our project- 
based curriculum. All five construction programs work collaboratively with the district's five towns. 
Highlighted this year are the following projects: the building of the third house for Greater Lowell 
Habitat for Humanity in Bedford, the final phase of the Marion Tavern farmhouse project in 
Burlington, construction of 75 violin cases for Wilmington High School, signs for the Billerica Rotary 
club and major concrete stair renovations at the Tewksbury Department of Public Works. The 
construction cluster also contributes to the daily projects within the school. A multi-tier retaining 
wall is currently under construction as part of a new soccer field house project. Other notable 
projects include: a 10'xl2' shed for the school's sand & salt, work stations in the Masonry and 
Carpentry programs, as well as repairs in the Cosmetology shop and Electronics. 

Arts and Communication Services Cluster 

Business Technology: The program traveled to several post secondary career days and field trips, 
exposing students to career opportunities. Some of the trips included the DeCordova Museum, 
Concord Museum, Hammond Castle and to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants 
(AICPA) conference at Bentley College. Capital improvements provided up dating and re-imaged 
computers in all three labs. Students continue to thrive in the Business Professionals of America, 
medaling at both the state and national levels. 



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Informational Support Services & Networking: Microsoft Academy is now part of IT's curriculum 
with future goals to train and certify our students as Microsoft Certified Professionals in Windows7. 
The Class of 2012 completed online Career Safe Program and prepared for Co-op opportunities. Two 
students won the bronze medal at the National SkillsUSA conference in Web Design. 

Design & Visual Communications: The department took on the major school initiative this year of 
redesigning and launching the new SVTHS website. With the advent of the website, the program 
will continue to grow and expand its digital media curriculum. Work-based learning culminates 
through the many in-house and community projects. This valuable component of the curriculum is 
where students continue to learn skills in video and DVD production and photography. Through the 
capital budget process, a technology plan was completed in Lab A, updating 25 Mac computers. 

Graphic Communications: The Graphics program continues to implement hands-on projects in the 
pre-press & pressroom that provide a great benefit in forming community partnerships. Every year 
the program produces a record number of live jobs for schools, town governments and nonprofit 
organizations. The program again received a national literary magazine award for their publication 
of Ramblings. Three students won bronze medals at the National SkillsUSA conference in National 
Occupational Health & Safety. 

Electro/Mechanical Cluster 

Computer Aided Design & Drafting: The Drafting shop has been busy once again this year in 
helping support the construction cluster in a variety of projects. These major projects included the 
Soccer Field House, Library Drop Box and various offsite construction drawings. In addition, the 
program has completed various drawings such as the rooftop units map, cafeteria/gym table and 
chair layout and the Go-Cart project. Through the capital budget process the program was able to 
create two more computer work stations in each grade level, expanding the capacity to 40 computer 
work stations. Also addressed was the replacement of 18 computers which were also re-imaged with 
the latest CAD software. 

Electronics: The Electronics program will move forward in training and certifying students to the J- 
STD-001E IPC Standard. An instructor was trained as a certified IPC trainer and curriculum and 
projects have been developed. A record number of students participated in SkillsUSA with 
Shawsheen Electronics taking the top four places at the regional competition. The Electronics 
students placed first at the annual Trebuchet competition at Windham High School, while also 
participating at the First Tech Challenge (Robotics) which made it into the State Competition. 

Machine Technology: The machine shop has seen many changes this year, the first being the creation 
of a related classroom which was formerly a heat treat and grinding area within the shop. A new 
shop floor layout of equipment was also implemented, creating the flexibility to incorporate many 
new projects into all levels of the curriculum. Through the capital budget process a new 3-axis 
Prototrak Milling Machine is being quoted. Four students won the gold medal at the SkillsUSA 
districts in CNC Milling Technology & Precision Machine Technology. 

Metal Fabrication and Welding: Metal Fabrication has worked on numerous welding and sheet 
metal projects that supported multiple school clusters and the community at large. This work 
included duct work for a new related room, a library drop box project, new Autobody ramps, a stool 
repair for M.C.I. Billerica and the Go-Cart project. For the second consecutive year, SVTHS hosted 
the annual open house for the Boston Chapter of American Welding Society (AWS). Two new swing- 
arm ventilation hoods were approved through the capital budget process. Mitre Corporation donated 
various pieces of equipment to our program, including a four foot hydraulic press brake, large 
capacity box and pan brake and a vertical band saw. 



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Conclusion and Acknowledgement 



The SVTHS Committee, staff and students gratefully appreciate the support that they receive from 
the residents of the five-member District. The SVTHS family especially acknowledges the continued 
financial support of the local town managers, finance committees and town meetings, who 
collectively ensure and perpetuate the highest quality in vocational/technical training opportunities 
for area youth. 

The District is grateful for the significant contributions provided by SVTHS staff and employees and 
acknowledges the many contributions of the SVTHS staff who retired during 2011. Those retirees 
are: James Byrnes, Mathematics; Marilyn Ferro, Business Information Services; Linda LeClair, 
Business Information Services; Leah Marquis, English Language Arts and Elaine Pearl, Executive 
Administrative Assistant, Superintendent/Director's Office. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning & Conservation Department 

In 2011, the department continued to deal with a distressed economy. However, even with slowed 
development nationally and locally, Wilmington managed a slow pace of activity. The Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission continued abbreviated schedules of meeting once a month. 
When activity increases, as it inevitably will, each will resume a regular schedule of meeting twice a 
month. Provision of service to the community in the areas of planning, conservation, housing, 
transportation and other community development activities continued. The Planning Board remains 
responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control Act and Site Plan Review, issuance of 
Special Permits for Conservation Subdivisions, Chapter 81G roadway improvement projects, Over-55 
housing, multi-family units in the Central Business District, signage and lots having less than 
10,000 square feet of land, permits for Stormwater Management, recommendations on zoning 
amendments, cases before the Board of Appeals and specific planning studies. The Conservation 
Commission continues to be responsible for wetlands protection in accordance with the state 
Wetlands Protection Act. The Commission is also responsible for management of the Town's Open 
Space Land and for acquiring additional land for passive recreation. Department staff provides 
assistance to both the Planning Board and the Conservation Commission. 

Carole Hamilton is the Director of Planning and Conservation. She staffs the Planning Board. She 
chairs the Community Development Technical Review Team and the Property Review Board, 
coordinating the review of development projects and the disposition of town-owned land. She serves 
as the point person for review of 40B affordable housing projects and provides input to the Board of 
Appeals. The Director serves as the representative to the Transportation Improvement Program 
(TIP), the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning Council 
(NSPC), acting as the liaison between the town and the state on transportation and planning issues. 

Winifred McGowan serves as the Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation and provides 
technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the department on wetland and 
environmental issues. Michael C. Vivaldi serves as Assistant Planner. Senior Clerk, Cheryl 
Licciardi, provides administrative support. Joann Roberto served as senior clerk for most of the year 
before transferring to Elderly Services. 

Planning Board Activity 

The responsibilities of the Planning Board include review of subdivision and "Approval Not 
Required" plans; review of commercial and industrial site plans; issuance of special permits for 
Conservation Subdivisions, multi-family units in the Central Business District, Over-55 housing, lots 
having less than 10,000 square feet, Chapter 81G roadway improvements and signage, permits for 
Stormwater Management, recommendations to the Board of Appeals on variances and special 
permits, strategic and comprehensive planning, zoning amendments and implementation of the 
Muster Plan. 



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The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five-year terms. Planning 
Board members are Michael Sorrentino (Chairman), Ann Yurek (Clerk), Randi Holland, Brian 
Corrigan and James Banda, Jr. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by M.G.L. Chapter 41, 
Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed one conventional subdivision containing two lots. No conservation 
subdivisions were reviewed. 

Conventional Subdivisions # Lots Action 

Railroad Avenue 2 Approved with conditions 

One (1) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plan was submitted. The Planning Board determined that 
the subdivision of land did not require approval under the Subdivision Control Law, and the plan 
was endorsed. One new building lot was created by this plan. 

Site Plan Review 

Five new site plan review applications for commercial and industrial projects were submitted. Three 
projects were approved with conditions by the Planning Board; the two remaining are pending action 
by the Board. One proposal will construct an early childhood education facility on Main Street 
behind Sonic. The second will create a retail strip on Ballardvale Street on the former AGFA site 
and the final submission will create commercial condominiums near the ice skating rink off Main 
Street. The pending applications are for the reuse of an industrial building on Jewel Drive and the 
creation of a donut shop on Main Street at the site of the former Danvers Bank. 

Stormwater Management Permits 

The past year was the first full year of implementation of the Town's Stormwater Management 
Bylaw enacted at the 2009 Annual Town Meeting. A full Stormwater Management Permit is 
required for projects disturbing 20,000 square feet of land or more, while Simple Stormwater 
Management Permits are issued for projects causing less land disturbance, such as additions of 600 
square feet or more. This year, 39 applications for simple permits were received and 13 for full 
permits. Greater coordination between those departments involved in the development process has 
been one benefit of the new By-law. Full permits for projects disturbing 20,000 square feet of land or 
more require a public hearing. Those projects needing to file a Notice of Intent with the 
Conservation Commission are heard in conjunction with the public hearing for the Notice of Intent. 
Others are heard by the Planning Board in conjunction with a public hearing for Site Plan Review. 
Simple Stormwater applications are handled administratively by Planning & Conservation staff. 

Of the 39 applications for Simple Stormwater Management Permits, two were denied for inadequate 
information. They were subsequently resubmitted and approved with conditions. Three others are 
pending. Thirteen full Stormwater Management Permit applications were received. Twelve were 
approved with conditions and the 13th application is pending. 

Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board holds required statutory public 
hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map and submits formal reports and 
recommendations to Town Meeting voters. Those recommendations are included in this Annual 
Report under "Town Meeting." 

Conservation Commission Activity 

The Wilmington Conservation Commission is charged with upholding the interests of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act. The Commission received 44 filings for activities under the 
jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection (M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40 and its 
regulations at 310 CMR 10.00) in 2011. 



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Wilmington has an abundance of these wetland resource areas, including banks, bordering vegetated 
wetlands (swamps, marshes, etc.), land under water bodies and riverfront areas. Activities reviewed 
by the Commission can include tree removal and landscaping and construction of houses, driveways, 
additions, septic systems and subdivision roadways/utilities/drainage systems within 100 feet of the 
above resource areas or 200 feet of a perennial stream. Work within bordering land subject to 
flooding (floodplain) is also subject to the jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission. Each filing 
involves one or, in some cases, multiple public hearings before the Commission. The Commission 
seeks to work through the permitting process with the applicant to provide protection of the public 
and private water supply as well as groundwater supply, provide flood control, prevent storm 
damage and pollution and protect wildlife habitats. Residents are encouraged to attend and provide 
comment relative to work near wetland resource areas. The hearings are generally held on the first 
and third Wednesday of each month. The agenda for hearings can be accessed at 
www. town. Wilmington. ma. us/old/conserve. htm. 

When the Wilmington Conservation Commission was originally formed in 1964, its purpose was to 
inventory, promote, develop and conserve the town's natural resources. Today, the primary 
responsibility of the Conservation Commission is the administration and enforcement of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (310 CMR) leaving little time to actually acquire and 
manage open space. The Conservation Commission oversees a management plan for the Town 
Forest. Implementing effective forest management strategies are the Commission's goals. The 
significant size of the parcel (154 acres) and the fact that most of it is a scenic forested upland make 
it a very promising site for passive recreational activities such as hiking, horseback riding, 
picnicking, bicycling, cross-country skiing, birding and photography. With the access road and 
parking area, the forest is accessible to residents. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three-year terms by the Town Manager. Citizens 
serving on the Commission in 2011 were: Chairman Donald Pearson; Vice Chairman Vincent 
Licciardi; members Frank Ingram, Charles Fiore, Jr. and Julia Flynn. Heidi Mitza and Thomas 
Siracusa stepped down. Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations or filing procedures 
should be directed to Winifred McGowan, Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation. 

Special Projects: 

Affordable Housing 

The Town's achieved goal of 10% affordability was short-lived as the new U. S. census added housing 
units created during the past 10 years. The town is credited with having 7,788 housing units of 
which 711 are affordable units. The Town has now achieved 9.1% affordability. The property 
located at 10 Burlington Avenue, formerly known as Crystal Commons and now known as Legacy 
Place, has an active comprehensive permit. The Board of Appeals allowed the project developer to 
amend its application to become rental units rather than condominiums. The property has been 
transferred to the new owner and a demolition permit is expected to be issued in early 2012. Once 
building permits are issued, these units will be added to the Town's inventory of affordable units, 
bring the number of affordable units to 819 enabling the Town to again achieve 10% affordability. 
This will allow the community to consider affordable housing projects that attain significant 
community support and will prevent developers from seeking to overturn a negative decision by the 
Board of Appeals through the State Housing Appeals Court. 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Update 

The Town's Open Space and Recreation Plan is mandated to be updated every five years and the 
Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee was re-established in 2006 for that purpose. 

1-93 Interchange Planning 

The Town Manager, a representative of the Board of Selectmen, the Chairman of the Planning Board 
and the Planning Director serve on the 1-93 Task Force. Similar representatives from Andover and 
Tewksbury make up the remainder of the Task Force. A Memorandum of Understanding sets a 
framework of cooperation among the communities. All meetings of the Task Force are open to the 
public and posted in the respective communities. 



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Funds from a grant program administered by the Executive Office of Housing and Economic 
Development were awarded to each town for land use planning of the 700 acres identified as the 
study area for the interchange project. A draft Form Based Code is under review and will establish a 
form of land use and zoning for the development area. A Form Based Code is different than 
conventional zoning in that it is based on building form, arrangement of streets and walkways, 
provision of open space and density of use before the actual land use is established. Conventional 
zoning is strictly based on land uses allowed in districts with little to no emphasis on building and 
development form. 

During the year, the project has been on hold pending identification of a funding source. 

Statistical Data 

Filing Fees Collected 
Notices of Intent Filed 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 
Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation Issued/Pending 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 
Extension Permits Issued/Denied 
Enforcement Orders Issued 
Violation Notices Issued 
Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 
Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 
Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 
Emergency Certifications Issued 
Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 
Negative Determination/Pending 
Positive Determination/Withdrawn/Pending 
Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied/Pending 
Acres of Land Acquired 




The North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) is composed of eight towns and one city that have 
formed a voluntary association to facilitate cooperative regional planning. The goals of NSPC are to 
facilitate communication between member communities on planning topics of interest including: 
issues of growth management and land use and to provide a forum for members to create a shared 
agenda for action that, if thoughtfully addressed, will allow the region to continue to thrive as a 
desirable place to live and work. 

NSPC held ten meetings in 2011. Tony Fields, Town of Burlington, continued to serve as the 
Chairman, Joan Blaustein, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) Land Resources Planner, 
has served in the role of NSPC Subregional Coordinator for over two decades; she stepped down from 
this role in 2011. Jennifer Erickson, MAPC Regional Planner, will serve in this role moving forward. 
NSPC members heard from guest presenters as well as MAPC staff about various projects and topics 
of interest. Members received information about project funding opportunities through the 
Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant (SCRPG), District Local Technical Assistance 
(DLTA)-funded regional energy projects and the MAPC Local Energy Action Program. Presentations 
were also offered on timely topics like stormwater management, the regionalization of housing 
services and municipal governments and accessibility issues. Members continued the annual 
activity of reviewing NSPC transportation priorities, projects and study areas as part of the 
Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified Work Planning Program. Through the 
Sustainable Communities proposal development process, members identified a number of shared 
interests and project ideas, including: identification of priority development and preservation areas 
in the subregion; open space preservation and connectivity planning with potential linkages towards 
creation of a regional open space and trails system; residential development patterns in NSPC 
communities and best practices for regional corridor districts. 



$6,575.00 
23 
18 
3/0 
92 
3/0 
2 
50 
16/0 
1/0 
22/1/5 
6 
2/0 
18/2 
0/1/0 
2/0/1 
0.00 



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NSPC and its member communities also engaged in the following notable activities in 2011: 
submission of a comment letter on the TIP priority projects list to the Metropolitan Planning 
Organization (MPO), development and submission of a proposal to the Sustainable Communities 
Regional Planning grant program and participation in developing a 2012 NSPC Work Plan that 
includes new strategies the subregion will engage that are enabled by SCRPG funding. MAPC also 
commenced project work on the Reading- Wakefield-Melrose Main Street Corridor Planning Study, 
which involves two NSPC member communities, Wakefield and Reading, along with the City of 
Melrose. This project was funded through the 2011 DLTA program. It looks at ways to improve 
upon the existing transportation network by reducing automobile traffic while promoting commuter 
rail, walking, bicycling and bus transportation. 

MAPC continues to upgrade the NSPC webpage in an on-going effort to provide member 
communities with better access to information. The page is: www.mapc.org/subregions/nspc. 




The Middlesex Canal Commission (MCC) is a State Commission consisting of members representing 
each of the nine towns through which the canal traversed and representatives of the MassDOT, 
Conservation Department, state officials, Representative James R. Miceli and Senator Bruce E. 
Tarr. Thomas Raphael from the Town of Winchester has been Chairman for the past sixteen years. 
This has been a very busy year as the final planning for the 25 percent design's final approval by the 
MassDOT for the "Mill Pond Heritage Park" is underway. John Ryther from ICON and Thomas 
Raphael spent the year resolving the many details of basic construction. There were meetings with 
the Billerica Engineering Department, the MassDOT in Boston and at least three meetings at our 
museum with numerous representatives of state departments. This detail is necessary to fulfill 
requirements of eligibility for Federal Highway Enhancement Project Funding. 

The Middlesex Canal Association is a group whose purpose is to preserve the Canal and raise its 
awareness in the community. There are members at large who pay dues, elect a group of officers and 
plan a variety of activities to enhance its purpose. 

Activities in 2011 included a fall walk at Sandy Beach in Winchester/Mystic River Aqueduct in 
Medford and a spring walk at the Baldwin Mansion in Woburn. These are well attended and well 
liked. A fall bike ride led by Medford's Dick and Roberta Bauer. This is an enthusiastic group who 
ride up to Lowell, stopping by our museum for refreshments and then take the train back home. 
Three lectures at the museum: In the winter, Professor Chad Montrie spoke about the lower 
Concord River with emphasis on the industry there. In the spring, Chuck Parrott from the National 
Park Service discussed his research into the Tidal Mill that operated at Mill Creek in Boston. In the 
fall, Tom Raphael showed slides and spoke of his World Canal Conference attendance in the 
Netherlands. Jeff Ellis spoke of his 400 mile bike ride along the Erie Canal. This meeting was 
followed by refreshments consisting of Baldwin Apple crisp, an annual event. Education Programs 
led by Woburn Street School teacher Traci Jansen provided activities for 200 third graders at the 
museum. Additional sessions are planned as requested for adults and children. October is 
Massachusetts Archeology month. President Jay Breen showed people the marker used to 
determine the height of the Mill Pond water which he discovered for the first time. Past President of 
the Middlesex Canal Association, Leo Eno's original paper on the Great Billerica Dam Controversy 
was on display. Bill Berber had a display for pottery and household items which were discovered by 
John Ciriello in North Woburn when he was digging out the back of his house for an addition at the 
site of the Old Tay Tavern where the Middlesex Canal crossed from the east side of Route 38 to the 
west side. Senator Niki Tsongas celebrated Concord River Day at our museum. A large group of 
Girl Scouts were in attendance. They had studied water quality and several received awards. 
Wilmington teacher Traci Jansen received a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition in 
appreciation of her efforts to educate children about the historical significance of the Middlesex 
Canal and her gift of bringing local history to life. Neil Devin and Russ Silva covered a display of the 
Middlesex Canal at the annual Wilmington Memorial Library Community Fair. 



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Highlights of the year were our Celebration of Ten Years since the museum opened in July of 2001. 
This has been an extraordinary effort by a group of volunteers. The second highlight was when we 
were asked by the West End Museum in Boston to set up an exhibit about the Canal. We were 
delighted to accept. Few people in Boston realize that the Canal bi sected Canal Street in Boston 
and played a major role in bringing supplies for the construction of Boston. Granite, quarried in 
Chelmsford, was brought down the Canal to construct Massachusetts General Hospital's first 
building, the Fanuiel Hall Market Place and numerous Bulfinch mansions. Haymarket Square was 
the place where hay was brought to feed the horses. Lectures were given by our Directors. This four 
week exhibit was well attended. 

Unfortunately we lost three of our most prolific Directors: Col. Wilbar M. Hoxie, 94 years old, whose 
expertise and leadership led to the Shawsheen Aqueduct being declared a National Historic 
Engineering Landmark and drew up a map of the Middlesex Canal which was used in our National 
Historic Registry application. David Dettinger, 91 years old, wrote our canal song "Hauling Down to 
Boston," wrote the definitive thesis on "The Canal which Bisected Boston" and the play about how 
the Canal got started. Bruce McHenry, 79 years old, who worked for National Parks all over the 
country, gave us much valuable advice about how to improve our operations. They will be missed. 

The Middlesex Canal Museum and Visitor Center in North Billerica is open every weekend except 
major holidays from noon to 4 p.m. and is free. Our web site: www. middlesexcanal.org is well run 
and full of information. We welcome new members. 

Wilmington Middlesex Canal Commission Members are: Betty M. Bigwood, Neil P. Devins and 
Michael J. Mclnnis. 




-122- 



Inspector of Buildings 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-law and 
for maintaining all related records. In addition, all administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are 
handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Al Spaulding; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is Paul Raffi; the Wiring 
Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Toni La Rivee serves as the secretary for the Building Inspector's office 
and the Board of Appeals. 

It is our goal to help people understand the regulations enforced by the Inspector of Buildings, how 
best to comply with those regulations and to provide assistance to residents and others who have 
questions about homes and property in the town. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to 
come and see us. 







2009 




2010 




2011 


RESIDENTIAL 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


Single Family Dwellings 


26 


4,069,760 


39 


6,697,120 


35 


5,533,516 


Additions 


60 


2,352,473 


65 


2,471,341 


69 


2,485,488 


Remodeling 


168 


1,451,041 


251 


2,561,759 


247 


2,649,475 


Utility Buildings 


9 


77,600 


9 


114,964 


8 


193,075 


Pools 


17 


96,294 


24 


233,670 


14 


157,045 


Miscellaneous 


42 


389,717 


45 


232.982 


40 


582,835 




322 


8,436,885 


433 


12,311,836 


413 


11,601,434 


COMMERCIAL 














New Buildings 


5 


2,478,000 


5 


2,706,365 


3 


1,020,000 


Public Buildings 




















Additions 


3 


427,000 


3 


1,943,996 


o 

/ 


zo,yt>u 


Fitups 


57 


5,391,442 


36 


15,781,826 


47 


12,488,296 


Utility Buildings 


1 


60,000 








1 


4,800 


Signs 


33 


86,587 


24 


98,725 


17 


594,646 


Miscellaneous 


22 


869.095 


17 


700.787 


26 


1.300.830 




121 


9,312,124 


85 


21,231,699 


96 


15,434,532 


TOTAL 


443 


17,749,009 


518 


33,543,535 


509 


27,035,966 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 






Building Permits 


443 


210,070.50 


519 


287,544.07 


509 


299,056.00 


Wiring Permits 


471 


67,754.00 


513 


55,705.00 


539 


77,027.00 


Gas Permits 


228 


16,975.00 


265 


15,219.00 


280 


19,240.00 


Plumbing Permits 


262 


26,380.00 


328 


25,485.00 


331 


33,265.00 


Sheet Metal 














19 


5,880.00 


Cert, of Inspection 


47 


2,206.00 


30 


1,494.00 


24 


1,065.00 


Occupancy 


73 


3,600.00 


70 


3,500.00 


76 


3,750.00 


Copies 




53.60 




80.75 




378.25 


Court 




















Industrial Elec. Permits 


56 


9,000.00 


58 


9,750.00 


46 


6,900.00 


Board of Appeals Fees 


35 


3.500.00 


24 


2.400.00 


26 


3.100.00 


1,615 


$339,539.10 


1,807 


$401,177.82 


1,850 


$449,661.25 



-123- 




Case 1-11 Robert L. Gilbert Map 24 Parcel 6 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.15 Auto Repair for property located on 4 Jewel 
Drive, Unit 6. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 2-11 Ferro Ceramic Grinding, Inc. Map 99 Parcel 143 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.6.6 General Manufacturing for property located on 5 
Cornell Place. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 3-11 Ferro Ceramic Grinding, Inc. Map 99 Parcel 143 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.6 Handling of Hazardous Wastes for property 
located on 5 Cornell Place. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 4- 1 1 CampaneUi-Trigate GS LLC Map 99 Parcel 143 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.4 Parking for property located on 5 Cornell Place. 
Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 5-11 Cornell Real Estate LLC Map 99 Parcel 141 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.5 to construct an addition no closer than 20 feet from the rear yard lot 
line when 50 feet is required for property located at 1 Cornell Place. 

Granted - no closer than 20 feet. 

Case 6-11 Cornell Real Estate LLC Map 99 Parcel 1 4 1 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.4.3 Relief from Parking Regulations for property 
located at 1 Cornell Place. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 7- 1 1 Cornell Real Estate LLC Map 99 Parcel 141 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.7 requesting building coverage of 41% when 35% is allowed for property 
located at 1 Cornell Place. 

Granted - 41% when 35% is allowed. 



-124- 



Case 8-11 



Cornell Real Estate LLC 



Map 99 Parcel 141 



To acquire a variance from §5.2.6.1 natural buffer of 210 feet - 20 foot landscaped buffer when abutting 
residential property is required for property located at 1 Cornell Place. 

Granted - natural buffer of 210 feet. 

Case 9-11 Cornell Real Estate LLC Map 99 Parcel 1 4 1 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located at 1 Cornell Place. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 10-11 Tresca Brothers Sand & Gravel Map 38 Parcels 3 A & B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District. 
Denied 

Case 11-11 Tresca Brothers Sand & Gravel Map 38 Parcels 3 A & B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.6.6 General Manufacturing. 

Denied 

Case 12-11 Tresca Brothers Sand & Gravel Map 38 Parcels 3 A & B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.4 modify an existing nonconforming building for 
property located on 90 Eames Street. 

Denied 

Case 13-11 innoPad Inc. Map R2 Parcel 26C 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.6.5, Limited Manufacturing for property located at 
265 Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 

Case 14-11 Griffith Properties LLC Map R2 Parcels 2 1 & 7 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located on 150-200 Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



-125- 



Case 15-11 David T. Ward Map 34 Parcel 157 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District for property 
located on 15 Fitz Terrace. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 16-11 4 th of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.1.9 for a carnival during the Fun on the Fourth 
Celebration for property located on 159 Church Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 1 7- 1 1 Garrett R. DeBlois Map 97 Parcel 39 

To appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings and approve a variance from Standard Dimensional 
Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 (front yard setback) and §5.3.1 (special exceptions - average of abutting - 
33.05 feet) and construct an addition 26.2 feet from the front yard setback when 33.05 feet is allowed for 
property located on 1 1 Catherine Avenue. 

Denied - no demonstrated hardship. 



Case 18-11 Victoriano Layon Map 84 Parcel 84 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 to allow an existing 
addition to remain 29.7 feet from the front lot line when 30 feet is required for property located on 11 
McDonald Road. 

Granted - no closer than 29.7 feet from the front lot line. 



Case 19-11 Hidden Jewel LLC Map 24 Parcel 205 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.6.5 Limited Manufacturing for property located on 1 
Jewel Drive. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 20- 1 1 Gregory & Elizabeth McGowan Map 1 3 Parcel 003 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 to allow an existing 
cabana to remain 18 feet from the rear lot line when 25 feet is required for property located on 364 
Chestnut Street. 

Granted - no closer than 18 feet from the rear lot line. 



-126- 



Case 21-11 



MT Pokkets Realty Trust 



Map 25 Parcel 004 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 to allow an existing 
building to remain 27.1 feet from the rear lot line when 50 feet is required and §5.2.6.1 which requires a 
residential landscape buffer between business and residential uses for property located on 911 Main 
Street. 

Granted - no closer than 27.1 feet from the rear lot line. 



Case 22-11 Panera Bread Map 043 Parcel 005 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant for property located 
at (240 Main Street- Wilmington Plaza) 228 Main Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 23-11 Mary C. Law Map 31 Parcels 68 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (for a 
bulkhead to be 16 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required) for property located on 3 
Dunmore Road. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



Case 24-11 William F. Cavanaugh, III Map 55 Parcel 33 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to add a 
second story to an existing nonconforming structure-rear portion only) for property located on 2 Jones 
Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



Case 25-11 Dana Anderson c/o F. Hancox Map 53 Parcel 21A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
construct a two-story addition 10.7 feet from the side yard lot line when 15 feet is required) for property 
located at 3 Rhodes Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than existing nonconforming structure. 



Case 26-11 Dana Anderson c/o F. Hancox Map 53 Parcel 2 1A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District (to render 
impervious more than 15%) for property located at 3 Rhodes Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



-127- 



Case 27-11 



Karen Lee c/o R. Peterson 



Map 97 Parcel 44 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 Ground Water Protection District (to render 
impervious more than 15%) for property located at 7 Arlene Avenue. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the Zoning By-law. 



Case 28- 1 1 Richard Gore Map 70 Parcel 93 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 for an additional deck to 
be 8'2" from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required for property located on 51 Salem Street. 

Pending 



Case 29- 1 1 Sidney Kaizer c/o F. Hancox Map 45 Parcel 90 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 for an addition to be 6'1" 
from the side yard lot line when 15 feet is required for property located on 5 Cottage Avenue. 

Pending 




During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the Constable in each of the six 
(6) precincts. 

Annual Town Election and Town Meeting April 6, 2011 
Special Town Election October 14, 2011 

Special Town Meeting November 2, 2011 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 23, 2011 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON . 

TO: Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

ARTICLE 1 : To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices to wit: 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years; two members of the School Committee for the term of 
three years; one member of the Housing Authority for the term of five years; and one member of the 
Redevelopment Authority for a term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble 
subsequently and meet in the Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, 159 Church Street, in 
said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday the thirtieth day of April, A.D. 2011 at 10:30 a.m., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. 
George, at the Town Hall, Board of Registrar Member Priscilla Ward, at the Boutwell School and 
Warden, Patricia McKenna at the Wildwood School. 



-128- 



All voting equipment was in place in each precinct. The checkers were prepared with their voting 
lists and everything was in readiness at 8:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 

The results were as follows: 



Board of Selectmen for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Raymond N. Lepore 1,388 

Michael V. McCoy 1,739 

Mark Nelson 478 

Judith O'Connell 1,714 

Write-in 10 

Blanks 729 

Total 6,058 

School Committee for three years (vote for two) 

Leslee A. Quick 1,516 

Michael Bodnar, Jr. 631 

Virginia M. Bonish 1,682 

Manny L. Mulas 722 

Karl I. Sagal 414 

Write-in 78 

Blanks 1,015 

Total 6,058 

Housing Authority for five years (vote for one) 

Gregory Bendel (write-in candidate) 321 

Write-in 78 

Blanks 2.630 

Total 3,029 

Redevelopment Authority for five years (vote for one) 

Patrick M. Keogan 1,851 

Write-in 17 

Blanks 1.161 

Total 3,029 



The results of this election were ready at 8:30 p.m. and the elected officers present were sworn in to 
the faithful performance of their duties by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. George. The total number of 
votes cast was 3,029, which represented 20% of Wilmington's 15,516 registered voters. 

- ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, 2011 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 10:50 a.m. (150 by the Town of Wilmington By-Laws) James Stewart, 
Town Moderator, opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. The colors were presented by 
the Wilmington Minutemen. The Moderator then read the names of departed town workers, 
members of committees and boards that had passed away during the past year. Those present 
paused in tribute to our servicemen and women and the hope that they will all return safely home. 
A moment of silence was observed for all. He then introduced our newly elected and re-elected town 
officials. 

MOTION: On motion of Chairman Louis Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY that the Moderator suspend the reading of the Warrant 
and take up and make reference to each article by number. 

-129- 



ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. 



MOTION: On motion of Michael Caira, Town Manager, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY that no action be taken. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of 
previous years; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira, and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by the 
Town of Wilmington not to adopt Article 3. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, to enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2012 and for a term not to exceed three years, which will permit 
the Town of Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such institutions in return for said 
institutions providing banking services; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by 
the Town of Wilmington to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2012 and for a term not to exceed three 
years, which will permit the Town of Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such 
institutions in return for said institutions providing banking services. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses of the town and the 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Discussion began regarding the way each department budget was voted. A vote was put to the body 
as to taking each category; such as General Government, Public Safety, rather each department 
within the category. 

MOTION: On motion of John Doherty, Chairman of the Finance Committee, and duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative that the several and respective 
sums as recommended and presented by the Finance Committee be raised from the FY- 12 
tax levy and other general revenues of the Town, or by transfer from available funds as may 
be recommended by the Finance Committee, and be appropriated for the purpose set forth in 
Article #5, each budget category including General Government; Public Safety; Public Works; 
Community Development; Public Buildings; Human Services; Wilmington School 
Department; Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District; 
Maturing Debt and Interest; Unclassified & Reserve and Statutory Charges to be taken up 
and voted on in the order they appear, subject to amendment, and each budget category not 
be open for reconsideration until the entire budget is voted. 

The Moderator recognized Mr. Doherty for comments. Mr. Doherty stated that the Finance 
Committee has four motions (5A, 5B, 5C and 5D) that will be voted on during the budget votes. Each 
motion will be voted during the part of the budget it refers to. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 4,620 

Expenses 14,800 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 19,420 



-130- 



Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 25,623 

Expenses 13,565 

Total 39,188 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,875 

Expenses 6,450 

Total 8,325 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 1,400 

Expenses 8,500 

Total 9,900 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 140,000 

Other Salaries 285,971 

Expenses 70,300 

Furnishings & Equipment 1,400 

Total 497,671 



Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 104,268 

Other Salaries 234,190 

Expenses 2,315 

Furnishings & Equipment 245 

Total 341,018 



Treasurer/Collector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 84,687 

Other Salaries 141,774 

Expenses 19,482 

Amt. Cert. Tax Title 15,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 125 

Total 261,068 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 75,613 

Other Salaries 77,520 

Expenses 3,350 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 156,483 



Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 101,494 

Other Salaries 92,042 

Expenses 79,100 

Appraisals & Inventory 62,500 

ATB Costs 20,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 2.300 

Total 357,436 



Town Counsel 

Legal Services 221,000 

Expenses 5,500 

Total 226,500 



-131- 



Permanent Building Committee 

Salaries 450 

Expenses 

Total 450 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT L917.459 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Police 



Salary - Chief 


111,860 


Salary - Deputy Chief 


98,470 


Salary — Lieutenants 


304,343 


Salary - Sergeants 


390,638 


Salary - Patrolmen 


1,894,609 


Salary - Clerks 


85,503 


Salary - Overtime 


445,000 


Salary - Paid Holidays 


100,000 


Salary - Specialists 


12,350 


Salary - Night Differential 


45,864 


Salary - Incentive 


223,785 


Sick Leave Buyback 


30,667 


Expenses 


234,349 


Furnishings & Equipment 


21.300 


Total 


3,998,738 



Fire 



Salary - Chief 


114,856 


Salary - Deputy Chief 


87,527 


Salary - Lieutenants 


453,086 


Salary - Privates 


1,906,468 


Salary - Clerk 


52,470 


Salary - Part Time 


18,655 


Salary - Overtime 


450,000 


Salary - Paid Holidays 


128,446 


Salary - EMT & Incentive Pay 


9,025 


Salary - Fire Alarms 





Salary - Sick Leave Buyback 


28,878 


Expenses 


121,325 


Furnishing & Equipment 


18.000 


Total 


3,388,736 



Public Safety Central Dispatch 



Personnel Services 554,535 

Contractual Services 28,000 

Material & Supplies 3,750 

Furnishings & Equipment 5.000 

Total 591,285 

Animal Control 

Salaries 39,335 

Expenses 3,825 

Total 43,160 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 8.021.919 



-132- 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Personnel Services 

Superintendent 105,867 

Engineer - Full Time 229,584 

Engineer - Part Time 12,220 

Highway - Full Time 1,183,403 

Highway - Overtime 60,990 

Highway - Seasonal 13,600 

Stream Maintenance - Seasonal 13,600 

Tree - Full Time 181,257 

Tree - Overtime 8,800 

Parks/Grounds - Full Time 326,416 

Parks/Grounds - Overtime 18,830 

Cemetery - Full Time 118,615 

Cemetery - Part Time 6,760 

Cemetery - Overtime 10,360 

Snow/Ice - Extra Help - Overtime 168,350 

Total 2,458,652 

Contractual Services 

Engineer 7,700 

Engineer - Training/Conference 2,000 

Highway 86,090 

Highway - Repairs/Town Vehicles 1 20,900 

Highway - Training/Conference 2,000 

Tree 5,000 

Parks/Grounds 19,000 

Cemetery 4,100 

Road Machinery - Repair 80,000 

Public Street Lights 265,000 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 1,606,511 

Snow & Ice - Repairs 18,730 

Snow & Ice - Miscellaneous Services 155,000 

Total 2,372,031 

Materials & Supplies 

Engineer 4,800 

Highway 39,000 

Highway - Construction Supplies & Road Improvements 82,000 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 174,387 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 138,312 

Stream Maintenance - Expenses 1,000 

Tree 6,500 

Parks/Grounds 106,060 

Cemetery 13,650 

Drainage Projects 55,000 

Snow & Ice - Salt & Sand 199,410 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 6,000 

Total 826,119 

Furnishings & Equipment 37,990 

SEWER 

Personnel Services 69,964 

Maintenance/Operations 59,120 

Total 129,084 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 5,823,876 



-133- 



5A 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Five Million Eight Hundred Twenty-Three Thousand Eight 
Hundred Seventy-Six Dollars ($5.823,876) be appropriated for the Department of Public 
Works; and to meet this appropriation Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) be transferred 
from the Sale of Cemetery Lots Account and that and the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars 
($20,000) be transferred from Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be 
applied to the line item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of 
Five Million Seven Hundred Eighty-Three Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-Six Dollars 
($5,783,876) be raised from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Board of Health 

Salary - Director 75,347 

Other Salaries 113,157 

Expenses 9,575 

Mental Health 35,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 233,079 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Salaries 

Expenses 5,000 

Total 5,000 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 81,664 

Other Salaries 222,748 

Expenses 10,175 

Furnishings & Equipment 500 

Total 315,087 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 73,411 

Other Salaries 106,901 

Expenses 4,250 

Furnishings/Equipment 

Total 184,562 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 737.728 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Salary - Superintendent 92,162 

Other Salaries 2,260,346 

Overtime 48,000 

Part Time Seasonal 13,600 

Heating 1,047,000 

Electricity 200,000 

Utilities 110,000 

Expenses 520,400 

Furnishings & Equipment 



TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 4.291.508 



-134- 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Veterans' Aid/Benefits 

Salary - Veterans' Agent 58, 7 1 3 

Expenses 1,800 

Assistance - Veterans 306,000 

Total 366,513 

Library 

Salary - Director 84,423 

Other Salaries 715,687 

Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 33,195 

Expenses 148,323 

Furnishings & Equipment 18,350 

Total 999,978 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 68, 60 1 

Other Salaries 46,994 

Expenses 4,500 

Furnishings & Equipment 700 

Total 120,795 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 66, 7 1 3 

Other Salaries 113,253 

Expenses 40,670 

Furnishings & Equipment 150 

Total 220,786 

Historical Commission 

Salaries 21,542 

Expenses 6,750 

Furnishings & Equipment Q 

Total 28,292 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 1.736.364 

SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 31,467,500 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District 3,252,000 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 34.719.500 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 113,213 

Public Safety 152,175 

General Government 

Sewer 176,198 

Water 163,080 
Interest on Anticipation of Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Miscellaneous Debt 20,000 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 624.666 



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5B 



MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Six Hundred Twenty-Four Thousand Six Hundred Sixty-Six 
Dollars ($624,666) be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest and, to meet this 
appropriation, the sum of One Hundred Sixty-Three Thousand One Hundred Sixty Dollars 
($163,160) be transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the line 
item Maturing Dept and Interest- Water and that the sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000) 
be transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the line item 
Maturing Debt and Interest, Authorization Fees and Miscellaneous Debt, and that the 
balance of Four Hundred Fifty-Nine Thousand Five Hundred Six Dollars ($459,506) be 
raised from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 



5C 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Eleven Million Two Hundred Twenty- Four Thousand Three 
Hundred Forty Dollars ($11,224,340) be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve of which 
the sum of Eighty-Five Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-Five Dollars ($85,995) be 
transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and 
Reserve - Insurance Account; and that the sum of Two Hundred Sixty- Eight Thousand Six 
Hundred Thirty-Four Dollars ($268,634) be transferred from Water Department Available 
Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Employee Life and Health Insurance 
Account; and that the sum of Twenty-Two Thousand Five Hundred Thirty-Three Dollars 
($22,533) be transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the 
Unclassified and Reserve - Medicare Employee's Contribution Account; and that the 
remaining balance of Ten Million Eight Hundred Forty-Seven Thousand One Hundred 
Seventy-Eight Dollars ($10,847,178) be raised from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general 
revenues of the Town. 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 
Insurance 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 

Veterans' Retirement 

Employee Retirement Unused Sick Leave 

Medicare Employer's Contribution 

Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 

Local Transportation & Training Conferences 

Out-of- State Travel 

Computer Maintenance Expenses 

Annual Audit 

Ambulance Billing 

Town Report & Calendar 

Professional & Technical Services 

Reserve Fund 



585,600 
9,066,000 




36,740 
562,500 
250,000 
5,000 
1,500 
90,000 
30,000 
27,000 
10,000 
110,000 
450,000 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 



11,224,340 



TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 



34,377,860 



STATUTORY CHARGES 
Current Year Overlay 
Retirement Contributions 
Offset Items 
Special Education 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 
RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 
Metro Air Pollution Control District 
Mosquito Control Program 



700,000 
4,195,687 



439,738 



6,636 
12,500 

6,614 
47,382 



38,000 
4,331 



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M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 2,208,067 

School Choice 22,600 

Charter Schools 81,981 

Essex County Technical Institute 49,159 

TOTAL STATUTORY CHARGES 7.812.695 



5D 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the sum of Seven Million Eight Hundred Twelve Thousand Six Hundred 
Ninety-Five Dollars ($7,812.695) be appropriated for Statutory Charges of which the sum of 
Three Hundred Sixty-Seven Thousand Five Hundred Eighty-Eight Dollars ($367.588) be 
transferred from Water Department Available Funds and be applied to the Statutory 
Charges - Retirement Contributions Account; and that the remaining balance of Seven 
Million Four Hundred Forty-Five Thousand One Hundred Seven Dollars ($7.445.107) be 
raised from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town. 



TOTAL 76,910,055 

PROPOSED CAPITAL OUTLAY & WARRANT ARTICLES 1,808,035 

TOTAL PROPOSED BUDGET 78,718,090 

ESTIMATED AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Tax Levy 57,647,262 

Local Receipts 5,828,000 

Local Receipts - Sewer 2,324,151 

Local Aid 11,968,767 

Free Cash 

Water Dept. Available Funds 909,910 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 20,000 

Cemetery Trust Fund - Interest 20,000 

Capital Stabilization Fund 

Capital Project Closeouts 

TOTAL ESTIMATED FY 2012 AVAILABLE FUNDS 78.718.090 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available funds, 
or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase of new and/or 
replacement capital equipment, including but not limited to the following items, and further to 
authorize the sale, trade-in, conveyance or other disposition of any equipment being so replaced, 
such funds to be spent by the town department, so indicated, with the approval of the Town 
Manager, and to the extent set forth in Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, the Board of Selectmen, as 
follows: 

Police Department 

Purchase of five (5) replacement police cruisers 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Michael V. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($150.000) be 
raised and appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to 
be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of five (5) replacement police cruisers for the 
Police Department and further, the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles is hereby authorized. 



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Fire Department 

Purchase of one (1) rapid response vehicle 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Michael J. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Two Hundred Twenty Thousand Dollars ($220.000) 
be raised and appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town 
to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) rapid response vehicle for the 
Fire Department. 

Public Buildings Department 
Purchase of two (2) cargo vans 

MOTON: On motion of Selectman Michael L. Champoux, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Forty-Two Thousand Dollars ($42,000) be raised 
and appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent 
by the Town Manager for the purchase of two (2) cargo van trucks for the Public Buildings 
Department and further, the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles is hereby authorized. 

Department of Public Works 

Purchase of one (1) replacement 3/4 ton pick-up truck with cap and plow; one (1) replacement skid 
steer loader and one (1) replacement heavy duty catch basin cleaner truck, all vehicles to be assigned 
to the Highway Division 

MOTION: On motion of Selectman Judith L. O'Connell, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative that Two Hundred Thirty-Nine Thousand Nine Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($239,950) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other 
general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement 3/4 ton pick-up truck with cap and plow, one (1) replacement skid steer loader 
and one (1) replacement heavy duty catch basin cleaner truck for the Department of Public 
Works and further the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, of said replaced vehicles is 
hereby authorized. 

Department of Elderly Services 

Purchase of one (1) replacement wheelchair accessible transport van. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Sixty Thousand Five Hundred Twenty-Five Dollars ($60,525) be raised 
and appropriated from the FY-12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent 
by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) replacement wheelchair accessible 
transport van for the Department of Elderly Services and further the sale, trade in or other 
disposition, if any, of said replaced vehicle is hereby authorized. 

School Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement wheelchair accessible mini- van; 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that Forty-Seven Thousand Dollars ($47,000) be raised and appropriated from 
the FY-12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager 
for the purchase of one (1) replacement wheelchair accessible mini-van for the School 
Department and further the sale, trade in or other disposition, if any, of said replaced vehicle 
is hereby authorized. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 



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ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the replacement of approximately 
2,545 square feet of roof area at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center; 5,260 square feet of roof area 
at the Public Buildings Department headquarters and 9,652 square feet of roof area at the Public 
Works Department headquarters, such funds to be spent by the Public Buildings Department with 
the approval of the Town Manager; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Three Hundred Thirty-Six Thousand Dollars ($336,000) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by 
the Town Manager for the replacement of approximately 2,545 square feet of roof area at the 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center; 5,260 square feet of roof area at the Public Buildings 
Department headquarters and 9,652 square feet of roof area at the Public Works Department 
headquarters. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase and installation of an 
upgraded fire alarm system at the North Intermediate School and at the Woburn Street School; or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux, seconded by Mr. Doherty, the Town of Wilmington 
voted in the affirmative that Three Hundred Ten Thousand Dollars ($310,000) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by 
the Town Manager for the purchase and installation of an upgraded fire alarm system at the 
North Intermediate School and at the Woburn Street School. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase and installation of one 
high energy efficient forced hot air furnace at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Ms. O'Connell, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Eighty-Five Thousand Dollars ($85,000) be raised and appropriated from 
the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager 
for the purchase and installation of one (1) high energy efficient forced hot air furnace at the 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available 
funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to replace windows and doors at 
the Wilmington Memorial Library; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Seventy-Five Thousand Dollars ($75,000) be raised and appropriated 
from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by the Town 
Manager for the purchase and installation of replacement windows and doors at the 
Wilmington Memorial Library. 



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ARTICLE 11. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any 
available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to make improvements 
to school and recreation play areas including the replacement of fencing at the Woburn Street School 
tennis courts; the replacement of fencing and the resurfacing of the tennis and basketball courts 
located across from the Boutwell School; and the repair of play structures and other maintenance 
improvements to the Justin A. O'Neil Memorial Skate Park located on the grounds of the Shawsheen 
School; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that Ninety-Four Thousand Seven Hundred Dollars ($94,700) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by 
the Town Manager to make improvements to school and recreational play areas at the 
Woburn Street School Tennis Courts; at the tennis and basketball courts located across from 
the Boutwell School and at the Justin Andrew O'Neil Memorial Skate Park located on the 
grounds of the Shawsheen School. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available 
funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to undertake various 
improvements and repairs to municipal and school facilities including but not limited to addressing 
energy efficiencies, plant operations, mechanical systems, structural issues and code compliance, 
such funds to be spent by the Public Buildings Department with the approval of the Town Manager; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that One Hundred Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($125.000) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by 
the Town Manager to undertake various improvements and repairs to municipal and school 
facilities including but not limited to addressing energy efficiencies, plant operations, 
mechanical systems, structural issues and code compliance. 

ARTICLE 13. To see what sum the Town will vote to transfer into various line items of the Fiscal 
Year 2011 budget from other line items of said budget and from other available funds; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee Took No Action on this Article pending further information. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira, seconded by Mr. Doherty, the Town of Wilmington voted 
in the affirmative that Six Hundred Twelve Thousand Dollars ($612,000) be transferred from 
the following fiscal year 2011 accounts: 



Town Manager - Other Salaries 
Treasurer/Collector - Other Salaries 
Police Salary - Paid Holidays 

Public Safety Central Dispatch - Personnel Services 

Public Works, Personnel Services - Parks/Grounds, Full Time 

Public Works, Personnel Services - Cemetery, Full Time 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Public Street Lights 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Rubbish Collection & Disposal 

Public Works, Sewer - Personnel Services 

Board of Health - Other Salaries 

Elderly Services - Other Salaries 

Schools - Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Tech. H. S. District 
Unclassified and Reserve - Veterans' Retirement 



$ 



25,000 
20,000 
25,000 
60,000 
50,000 
35,000 
30,000 
200,000 
35,000 
20,000 
25,000 
77,000 
10,000 



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the entire amount of available funds being $612,000 to the following fiscal year 
2011 accounts: 



Police, Salary - Overtime 
Fire, Salary - Overtime 

Public Works, Personnel Services - Snow & Ice, Extra Help/Overtime 
Public Works, Contractual Services - Snow & Ice, Misc. Services 
Public Works, Materials & Supplies, Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 
Public Works, Materials & Supplies, Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 
Public Buildings — Heating Fuel 

Capital Outlay, Public Buildings - Misc. Facilities Improvements 



60,000 
75,000 
46,000 
125,000 
20,000 
20,000 
150,000 
116,000 



Total $ 612,000 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen 
work opportunities for services rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen 
Tax Work-Off Program; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
in the affirmative that Fifteen Thousand Three Hundred Sixty Dollars ($15,360) be raised 
and appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be 
spent by the Town Manager for the purpose of providing senior citizen work opportunities for 
services rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off 
Program. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Ms. O'Connell, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that Six Thousand Dollars ($6,000) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 
12 tax levy and other general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the 
observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $1,500) for the purpose 
of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee- Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Wilmington Post 136 of the American Legion; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that One Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($1,500) be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 12 tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to be spent by 
the Town Manager for the purpose of renewing, under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 
40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 



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a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Nee- Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the 
United States; 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Wilmington Post 136 of the American Legion; 

Random selection begins with Article 17 

ARTICLE 17. (drawn #24) To see if the Town will vote to authorize or reauthorize as the case may 
be, revolving accounts pursuant to M. G. L. Chapter 44, Section 53E l A for the various boards, 
commissions, departments and agencies of the Town; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in the 
affirmative that the Town vote to reauthorize the following revolving accounts pursuant to 
M. G. L. Chapter 44, Section 53 E K as follows: 

First a Compost Bin Revolving Fund with an established spending limit of $4,500, with 
the source of revenues being the sale of composting bins, the spending authority being 
the Town Manager and the purpose for which money may be spent is the purchase of 
composting bins; and second, a Subsurface Sewage Disposal Upgrade Revolving Fund 
with an established spending limit of $200,000, with the source of revenues being 
betterment receipts and other loan repayments from property owners participating in 
said program, the purpose of expenditures being the repair and upgrade of subsurface 
sewage disposal systems and the repayment to the Massachusetts Water Pollution 
Abatement Trust of any funds advanced to the town for this purpose, and the spending 
authority being the Board of Health with the approval of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn #22) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money representing the amount of proceeds received by the town from the 
Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) products liability litigation settlements or otherwise to transfer 
such MTBE settlement proceeds to the Water Fund; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Water & Sewer Commissioner Joseph Balliro, and duly seconded, 
the Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative that the sum of Three Thousand Nine 
Hundred Two and 34/100 Dollars ($3,902.34) , representing the amount of proceeds received 
by the treasury of the Town during fiscal year 2011 from the Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 
(MTBE) products liability litigation settlements be hereby transferred from the treasury of 
the Town to the Water Fund. 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn #34) To see if the Town will vote to accept Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 64L, Section 2(a) to impose a local meals tax; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Discussion ensued on Article 19. Mr. Newhouse started the discussion stating that he is in favor of 
approving the meals tax. Right now he said we are supporting other town's that have already passed 
this tax. 

Mr. Champoux read a statement that he was opposed to the meals tax. 

Town Manager Michael Caira spoke in favor of the meals tax stating it could generate $300,000 for 
the town. 



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Mr. McCoy spoke in opposition, as did many others in the audience. 

Move the Question: It was motioned and seconded from the floor to Move the Question thus ending 
debate. Voted in favor. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 65 
in favor 29 opposed that the Town accept M. G. L. Chapter 64L, Section 2(a) to impose a 
local meals tax. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn #35) To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the following 
described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
(Massachusetts General Laws Ch. 41 and Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on certain Definitive 
Subdivision plans approved in accordance with "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of 
Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts," which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds and copies of which are on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and to authorize the 
Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain such land and slope, drainage and other 
easements as may be necessary to effectuate the purpose of this Article; and further to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money to be spent by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen for such 
purposes; and to take any other action related thereto. 

a. Leonard Lane - Beginning at a stone bound located at the southerly sideline of 

Hopkins Street and the northeasterly corner of land now or formerly owned by Gari 
and Marty Sinh; thence fifty-one and fifty-two hundredths (51.52') feet along the arc 
of a curve with radius of thirty feet (30.00') to the right to a stone bound. Thence 
Sl2°-29'-58" W a distance of ninety and eighty-nine hundredths feet (90.89') to a 
stone bound. Thence forty-eight and seventy-seven hundredths feet (48.77') along the 
arc length of a curve to the left with radius two-hundred twenty-five feet (225.00') to 
a stone bound. Thence S0°-04'-50" W a distance of one hundred fifty and seventy- 
three hundredths feet (150.73') to a stone bound. Thence one hundred three and 
fifty-seven hundredths feet (103.57') along the arc length of a curve to the left with 
radius two hundred twenty-five feet (225.00') to a stone bound, thence twenty-five 
and thirty-one hundredths feet (25.31') along the arc of a curve with radius of thirty 
feet (30.00') to the right to a stone bound. Thence two hundred ninety-seven and 
seventy-three hundredths feet (297.73') along a curve to the left, which is the 
roadway cul-de-sac with radius sixty feet (60.00') to a stone bound. Thence thirty and 
eighty-four hundredths feet (30.84') along the arc of a curve with radius of thirty feet 
(30.00') to the right to a stone bound. Thence seventy-one and sixty-six hundredths 
feet (71.66') along the arc of a curve to the right with radius of one hundred seventy- 
five feet (175.00') to the right to a point. Thence N0°-04'-50" E a distance of one 
hundred fifty and seventy-three hundredths feet (150.73') to a stone bound. Thence 
thirty-seven and ninety-three hundredths feet (37.93') along the arc of a curve to the 
right with radius of one hundred seventy-five feet (175.00') to a stone bound. Thence 
N12°-29'-58" E a distance of one hundred seven and fourteen hundredths feet 
(107.14') to a stone bound. Thence forty-two and seventy-two hundredths feet (42.72') 
along the arc of a curve with radius of thirty feet (30.00') to the right to a stone bound 
on the southerly side of Hopkins Street. Thence S85°-54'-18" E a distance of one 
hundred eleven and nineteen hundredths feet (111.19') along the sideline of Hopkins 
Street to a stone bound at the point of beginning. 

The roadway right of way contains thirty-three thousand thirty-three (33,033) square 
feet more or less. The roadway is from Hopkins Street to the end of the cul-de-sac 
and is approximately 540 feet in length. 

The roadway parcel described above is Leonard Lane and is shown on the plan 
entitled "Leonard Estates - Wilmington Massachusetts - Definitive Subdivision plan 
- Lot Layout" dated December 7, 2004, scale 1" = 40', prepared by GCG Associates, 
Inc., Wilmington, MA 01887, recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Plan Book 218 plan 109 and also shown on the plan entitled "Street Acceptance and 



-143- 



Layout Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts - Leonard Lane" dated 
September 3, 2010, scale 1" = 30', drawn by O'Neill Associates Civil Engineers and 
Land Surveyors, 234 Park Street, North Reading, MA 01864. 

b. Mill Road Extension - Beginning at a stone bound located at the northeasterly corner 
of Lot 17 shown on the plans described below; thence ninety and thirty-six 
hundredths (90.36') feet along the arc of a curve with radius of one hundred fifty feet 
(150.00') to the right to a stone bound. Thence S75°-01'-08"W a distance of five 
hundred seventeen and fifty-six hundredths feet (517.56') to a stone bound. Thence 
thirty-one and five hundredths feet (31.05') along the arc length of a curve to the left 
with radius thirty-five feet (35.00') to a stone bound. Thence two hundred ninety- 
four and ninety-six hundredths feet (294.96') along a curve to the right, which is the 
roadway cul-de-sac with radius sixty feet (60.00') to a stone bound. Thence thirty-one 
and five hundredths feet (31.05') along the arc length of a curve to the left with 
radius thirty-five feet (35.00') to a stone bound. Thence N75°-01'-08"E a distance of 
five hundred seventeen and fifty-six hundredths feet (517.56') to a stone bound. 
Thence sixty and twenty-four hundredths feet (60.24') along the arc of a curve with 
radius of one hundred feet (100.00') to the right to a stone bound. Thence N40°-30'- 
20"E a distance of two and fifty-six hundredths feet (2.56') to an iron pin at the 
southeasterly corner of Lot 17 on shown on the plans described below. Thence S46°- 
33'-57"E a distance of fifty and seven hundredths feet (50.07') traveling across Mill 
Road to a stone bound at the point of the beginning. 

The roadway right of way contains forty-one thousand eight hundred eighty-eight 
(41,888) square feet more or less. This roadway is from the eastern boundaries of Lot 
1 and Lot 17 shown on the plan described below to the end of the cul-de-sac and is 
approximately 725 feet in length. 

The roadway parcel described above is Mill Road Extension and is shown on the plan 
entitled "Kylie Estates - Wilmington, Massachusetts - Definitive Subdivision plan - 
Lot Layout Plan" dated April 5, 2002, scale 1" = 60', prepared by GCG Associates, 
Inc., Wilmington, MA 01887 and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
in Plan Book 210 plan 149 and also shown on the plan entitled "Wilmington, 
Massachusetts Mill Road Street Acceptance Plan" dated June 3, 2008, scale 1"= 60', 
drawn by GCG Associates Inc., Wilmington MA; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. The roadways under consideration for 
acceptance were developed under subdivision control. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
in the affirmative that the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 41 and Chapter 82, as amended and shown on certain plans described below, be 
hereby accepted as town public ways and that the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized 
to acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise, such land, slope and drainage or 
other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article. 

Leonard Lane - As shown on the plan entitled "Leonard Estates - Wilmington 
Massachusetts - Definitive Subdivision plan - Lot Layout" dated December 7, 2004, scale 1" 
= 40', prepared by GCG Associates, Inc., Wilmington, MA 01887 recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 218 plan 109 and also shown on the plan entitled 
"Street Acceptance and Layout Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts - Leonard Lane" 
dated September 3, 2010, scale 1" = 30', drawn by O'Neill Associates Civil Engineers and 
Land Surveyors, 234 Park Street, North Reading, MA 01864. 



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Mill Road Extension - As shown on the plan entitled "Kylie Estates - Wilmington, 
Massachusetts - Definitive Subdivision plan - Lot Layout Plan" dated April 5, 2002, scale 1" 
= 60', prepared by GCG Associates, Inc., Wilmington, MA 01887 and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 210 plan 149 and also shown on the plan 
entitled "Wilmington, Massachusetts Mill Road Street Acceptance Plan" dated June 3, 2008, 
scale 1"= 60', drawn by GCG Associates Inc., Wilmington, MA. 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn #27) To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 
41, Section 110A which reads as follows: 

Any public office in any city or town may remain closed on any or all Saturdays as may be 
determined from time to time, in a city by the city council, subject to the provisions of the city 
charter, or, in a town, by vote of the town at a special or regular town meeting, and the 
provisions of section nine of chapter four shall apply in the case of such closing of any such 
office on any Saturday to the same extent as if such Saturday were a legal holiday; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Selectmen O'Connell, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted in the affirmative that the Town vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 41, 
Section 110A which reads as follows: 

Any public office in any city or town may remain closed on any or all Saturdays as may 
be determined from time to time, in a city by the city council, subject to the provisions of 
the city charter, or, in a town, by vote of the town at a special or regular town meeting, 
and the provisions of section nine of chapter four shall apply in the case of such closing of 
any such office on any Saturday to the same extent as if such Saturday were a legal 
holiday. 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn #30) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington, Revised by adding the following new Chapter 5, Section 52; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

SECTION 52 - CURFEW IN PUBLIC PARKS, PLAYGROUNDS AND FIELDS 

52.1 — Definitions 

(a) "Public parks" shall mean Town-owned property which is made available to the 
public for outdoor activities, recreational use, and similar activities; 

(h) "Playgrounds" and "fields" shall mean Town-owned property which is made available 
to the public for games, sports activities, and similar activities. 

(c) "Juvenile" - any person under the age of seventeen (17). 

(d) "Town-owned property" shall mean all property owned by the Town or by any of its 
departments, including but not limited to the Wilmington Public Schools. 

52.2 - Curfew 

52.2.1 -Hours 

It shall be unlawful for any person to remain idle, wander, stroll, play or be present 
within the boundaries of any public park, playground, or field, whether on foot, 
bicycle, or vehicle or conveyance of any kind, between the hours of one (1) hour after 
sunset and one (1) hour before sunrise. 



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52.2.2 - Exception 

Notwithstanding the foregoing prohibition: 

(a) a person may lawfully be present in a public park, playground or field during 
the hours prohibited by this section 52 only if such person has obtained a 
permit from the Town's Recreation Department or Public School Department, 
as applicable, which specifies the date and the hours of permitted use and a 
specific description of the permitted use. It shall be a violation of section 52.2.1 
if any person covered by the permit is present on such property beyond the 
specified hours of use or engages in activity other than that specifically 
authorized by the permit; 

(b) a person may lawfully be present during the hours prohibited by this section 52 
in those portions of a public park, playground or field which are illuminated by 
lighting which is controlled by the Town. Such person may be present in such 
portions of such property only during such hours as the Town controlled 
lighting is in active operation. It shall be a violation of section 52.2.1 if any 
such person is present in such portions of such property beyond the time at 
which such Town controlled lighting is shut off. 

52.2.3 - Signage 

The Town shall conspicuously post signage at the entrance(s) to public parks, 
playgrounds, and fields stating the hours of curfew and stating that violations will be 
subject to enforcement as set forth in this section 52. 

52.3 - Juveniles 

52.3.1 - Parental Responsibility 

It shall be unlawful for the parent or the legal guardian of a juvenile to suffer to 
permit, or by insufficient control, to allow the juvenile to be in violation of section 
52.2.1, above, unless such parent or legal guardian has made a missing person 
notification to the Town Police Department. 

52.3.2 - Procedure for Juveniles 

(a) Any police officer of the Town, upon observing a juvenile in violation of section 
52.2.1, above, shall ascertain the true name and address of such juvenile; shall 
warn such juvenile that he or she is in violation of this by-law; and shall direct 
such juvenile to immediately proceed to his or her residence. The officer shall 
make an official report to the Town's Chief of Police, who shall cause his 
designee to notify the parent or legal guardian. The first violation within a 
calendar year shall constitute a "warning" and shall be so noted in the records 
of the Town's Police Department. 

(b) If there is a second, and any subsequent, violation by a juvenile; a refusal by 
the juvenile to obey the direction of the officer; or a refusal by the juvenile to 
provide his or her true name and address or the provision by the juvenile of a 
false name or address, the juvenile shall be taken by the officer to the Town's 
Police Department and the parent or legal guardian shall be promptly notified 
to appear and to take charge of the juvenile. If the parent or guardian cannot 
be notified after reasonable efforts or after notification refuses or fails to appear 
and take charge of the juvenile, the juvenile probation officer shall be contacted 
and shall take charge of the juvenile or authorize the release of the juvenile to 

a responsible person. 

52.4 - Arrest 

Any police officer, upon viewing a violation of this by-law by any person other than a juvenile, 
shall have the right to arrest such person. 



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52.5 - Penalty for Violation 
(a) The penalty 




(b) 



Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Chief Begonis spoke on the proposed by-law. He discussed the merits of a curfew and that it did not 
prohibit use of the parks. He continued with his comments by saying it allows for reasonable hours 
for the parks and playgrounds. 

James Burnham, 406 Woburn Street, said he understands the intent, but offered the following 
amendment. 

AMENDMENT TO THE MAIN MOTION: 

Article 22, Section 52.2.2 "Exceptions" "Notwithstanding the foregoing prohibition:" 
New Subsection: 

(c) It shall not be an offense under this By-Law for a juvenile to be in a public park, 

playground or field during the hours prohibited by this Section 52 while acting in the 
interests of an employer or voluntary organization or while returning home as soon as 
reasonably practical from an organized sporting or other event which has been sponsored 
by an adult. 

MOTION: Mr. James Burnham moved the adoption of the amendment which was duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted to defeat the presented amendment to the main 
motion. (Motion Fails) 

Back to the Main Motion. 

Mr. Michael Sorrentino spoke stating he felt the by-law was very restrictive. Mr. Richard Hayden, 
also felt it was too restrictive. 

Chief Begonis stated that he felt the by-law gave the police additional options. 

A motion was made by Ms. Judy Mason from the floor and duly seconded to end debate on this 
article. Voted. 

MAIN MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted 63 in favor 23 opposed that the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, 
Revised be amended by adding a new Chapter 5, Section 52, which would establish curfew 
hours and related regulations in the Town's public parks, playgrounds and fields, as set forth 
in Article 22 of the 2011 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. (Motion Passes) 

November 22, 2011 - Attorney General's Office decision on Article 22 deleted two sentences, 1. 52.3.2 
b the last sentence of paragraph and 2. 52.4 "Arrest" in its entirety. 

There is no appeal process for challenging the decision of the Attorney General with regard to by-law 
submission. 



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ARTICLE 23. (drawn #28) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington, Revised by deleting existing Chapter 5, Section 23 in its entirety and 
replacing it with the following; or take any other action related thereto. 



SECTION 23 - REGULATION OF DEALERS IN JUNK, OLD METALS OR SECOND HAND 
ARTICLES 

23.1 License and Application Procedure 

The Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as the Licensing Authority for the Town of 
Wilmington may, upon petition, license such persons as it deems suitable to be dealers of 
junk, old metals, and/or second hand articles and to be keepers of shops for the purchase, 
sale or barter of such articles pursuant to law within the Town of Wilmington. Such licenses 
shall not be valid to protect the holders thereon in a building or place other than that 
designated in the license. All licenses shall contain a provision that the licensee agrees to 
abide by and be subject to all the provisions of this by-law, including all amendments thereof; 

23.1.1 - Definitions 

(a) "Second hand articles" means all previously-owned personal property, 
including but not limited to electronic equipment, televisions and monitors, 
radios, disc players, cellular telephones, computers, compact discs, video 
discs, computer games, electronic media, precious and semi-precious metals, 
stones and gems, jewelry, watches, cameras, video and audio recorders, tools, 
sporting goods, and athletic equipment. 

(b) "Dealer" means any person or entity conducting the business of buying, 
obtaining, acquiring, receiving, selling, exchanging, dealing in or dealing with 
items which are the subject of this By-law. 

23.1.2 - Applications 

Applications for such licenses shall be examined and reported upon by the Chief of 
Police or his designee(s). The Chief of Police shall be informed as to whether or not 
the applicant wishes to engage in business as a second-hand dealer of any of the 
above stated articles and, if so, shall specify the types of articles to be dealt with. 
The applicant will be required to provide information as to whether or not the 
licensee has previously held a similar license in another jurisdiction, whether any 
such license was ever revoked, suspended or surrendered, and if so the reason 
therefore. 

23.1.3 - Filing and Expiration 

Applications for new licenses under this by-law may be filed at any time with the 
Licensing Authority. Applications for the re-issuance of licenses already existing 
should be filed at least thirty (30) days before the expiration of such license. All 
licenses issued under this rule shall expire annually on the first day of May. Persons 
whose licenses have expired and have not been re-issued will be liable to prosecution 
for engaging in any business for which the license is required. 

23.1.4 - Abandonment 

Whenever a licensee has failed to use the license for a continuous period of 30 days in 
the business at the place for which the license was issued, the Chief of Police, 
through his designee, will report such to the Licensing Authority, who may then 
deem the license abandoned and expired. Written notice of such shall be provided to 
the licensee who shall be given reasonable opportunity to present evidence that 
business under the license was in fact conducted during the 30-day period or 
evidence of mitigating factors which the Licensing Authority may in its discretion 
deem sufficient to revoke the finding of abandonment. 



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23.2 - Records, Inspections, Signs, Hours of Operation 
23.2.1- Records 

Every such licensee shall keep a solid bound book, such book shall be legibly 
written in the English language. No entry in such book shall be erased, obliterated 
or defaced; the following information shall be recorded, at the time of every 
acquisition of any second hand article: 

date and time of the transaction; 

name, street address, city or town of residence, and date of birth of the person 
or entity from whom the article is acquired; 

the dollar amount transacted; 

a particular description of the article, including inscriptions and dates, brand 
name, model and serial numbers, type of stone, type of gem, type of metal or 
style of particular design (i.e.: filigree, serpentine); 

a photograph of the article. 

23.2.2 - Photo Identification and Transaction Form 

The licensee shall require at the time of the transaction a government-issued form of 
photographic identification of the person from whom the article is acquired to confirm 
that the name, address and date of birth are correct. The licensee shall also require 
such person to sign his name on a transaction form approved by the Chief of Police or 
his designee. A copy of the transaction form shall be retained permanently by the 
licensee and kept in alphabetical order as to the name of the person from whom the 
article was acquired. When the article is a precious or semi-precious metal, stone or 
gem the form of identification and the transaction form shall be photocopied and such 
photocopy shall be kept with the required books. 

23.2.3 - Inspections 

The shop of every licensee, all second hand articles, junk or old metals therein, and 
the book required by sub-section 23.2.1, above, shall at all times, during business 
hours be open to inspection by officers of the Wilmington Police Department or by 
any other person authorized by the Licensing Authority. Any such officer or person 
may during business hours enter upon any premises listed by a licensee under the 
by-law as the location at which such licensed business is conducted. Such officer or 
person may examine any and all second hand articles, junk and old metals kept or 
stored in or upon said property and all books and inventories relating thereto, and all 
such property, books and inventories shall be exhibited to any such officer or person 
upon demand. Refusal to permit inspection shall constitute a violation of this by-law. 
Such officer's or person's actions shall at all times conform to the established policies 
and procedures of the Wilmington Police Department. 

23.2.4 - Signs 

Every licensee shall post in a conspicuous place in the licensed premise a copy of this 
by-law to which the licensee shall affix his printed name and signature. Every 
licensee shall post in a conspicuous place the license issued under this by-law. No 
licensee shall place or maintain any signs upon or in connection with the licensed 
premises which indicate that any form of business is being conducted therein that is 
not specifically authorized by the license or that is contrary to any law, by-law or 
regulation. 

23.2.5 - Hours of Operation 

Any licensee may conduct the licensed business pursuant to this by-law only between 
the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. 



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23.2.6 - Report of Stolen Property 



It shall be a condition of every license issued pursuant to this by-law that the 
licensee promptly report to the Wilmington Police Department the receipt of any 
property as to which there is a reasonable basis for believing that the property may 
have been stolen from its rightful owner. Such reasonable basis shall be presumed to 
exist where the property contains a serial number or other identifying information 
which has been removed, erased, deleted or defaced. 

23.3 - Transactions with Minors, Retention of Property 

23.3.1 - Transactions with Minors 

No licensee shall, directly or indirectly, purchase, acquire or receive any property 
covered by this by-law, from any person who has not attained the age of eighteen (18) 
years old. 

23.3.2 - Holding Period 

No licensee shall permit any property purchased, acquired or received by him to be 
sold, modified or removed from the licensed premises until a period of thirty (30) days 
has elapsed from the date of purchase, acquisition or receipt unless the licensee has 
obtained written permission from the Wilmington Police Department. No such 
permission shall be granted until the expiration of at least two full days from the 
date of acquisition, purchase, or receipt. All property covered by this sub-section 
shall remain on the licensed premises and shall not be made available for purchase, 
acquisition or other transfer until the applicable holding period has expired. This 
sub-section shall not apply to auction purchases or estate purchases from an 
administrator/administratrix/executor/executrix, provided, however, that in the case 
of such estate purchases the purchase is accompanied by adequate written evidence 
of the transferor's authority. 

23.3.3 - Lost and Stolen Property 

If the Wilmington Police Department determines that there is probable cause to 
conclude that a particular item of property in the possession of a licensee has been 
stolen or if the Wilmington Police Department determines that a particular item of 
property in the possession of a licensee has been reported as lost or stolen, a stop 
order shall be issued to the licensee which shall bar any transfer of the subject 
property pending conclusion of an investigation or of any necessary legal proceedings 
commenced by the person claiming that the property is lost or stolen is positively 
identified by the person claiming to be the rightful owner, the property shall be held 
by the Wilmington Police Department in custody, according to existing policies and 
procedures of the Wilmington Police Department and pending the ultimate outcome 
of any legal proceedings regarding rightful ownership. If the Wilmington Police 
Department's investigation establishes that the property is in fact not lost or stolen, 
the stop order shall be immediately revoked. 

23.4 - Fees, Revocation, Violations, Rules and Regulations 

23.4.1 - License Fee 

For every license granted under the by-law and every re-issuance thereof, there shall 
be a reasonable fee paid to the Licensing Authority. Such fee shall be established by 
the Licensing Authority and shall apply uniformly to all licensees. 

23.4.2 - Revocation 

Any license issued pursuant to this by-law may be revoked at any time by the 
Licensing Authority, after notice to the licensee and a hearing if requested by the 
licensee, for violation of any provision of this by-law or of any rules or regulations 
issued hereunder, or for other cause. 



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23.4.3 - Penalty for Violations 



The penalty for violations of this by-law shall be enforced in accordance with the 
provisions of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Revised as 
well as Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 2 ID. The penalty for a 
first violation of this by-law shall be one hundred ($100.00) dollars, and for any 
second or subsequent offense violation shall be two hundred ($200.00) dollars. For 
any second or subsequent violation, the penalty shall apply to each individual item of 
property or incident that was not properly documented or permitted. 

23.5 - Severability 

If any provision of this by-law shall, in whole or in part, be held invalid for any reason, all 
other provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Chief Begonis spoke on the merit of Article 23, stating the purpose of the by-law is not to prohibit 
business. 

Mr. Burnham stated that he would like to offer an amendment. 

To amend Section 23.1.1 "Definitions" section (b) as follows: 

Section (b) "Dealer" means any person or entity conducting the business of buying, obtaining, 
acquiring, receiving, selling, exchanging or dealing with items which are subject of this By- 
Law and who maintain a shop for the purchase, sale, or barter of such articles. This 
definition of "Dealer" excludes persons who occasionally buy or sell items designated under 
this By-law on an informal or occasional basis whether from their residence or through 
auctions electronic and otherwise. 

Discussion on Amendment: 

Mr. Burnham stated that he wanted the definition of a dealer to be specific. 

MOTION: Mr. Burnham moved the adoption of the proposed amendment which was duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 20 in favor 67 opposed to the proposed amendment 
to Article 23. (Motion Fails) 

Discussion continued from the floor with Brian Dussault stating the holding period will hurt his 
business. Chief Begonis replied that is not the intention of the by-law. 

Mr. William Wallace asked the Chief if other town's do this. The Chief replied yes. 

Move the Question: 

It was moved and seconded from the floor to move the question. So Voted. 

MAIN MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted 81 in favor 33 opposed that the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, 
Revised be amended by replacing existing Chapter 5, Section 23 in its entirety with a new 
Chapter 5, Section 23, which would establish regulations and requirements for the licensing 
and operation in the Town of dealers in junk, old metals and second hand articles, as set 
forth in Article 23 of the 2011 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 



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ARTI CLE 24. (drawn #19) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington, Revised by deleting existing Chapter 5, Section 24 in its entirety and 
replacing it with the following; or take any other action related thereto. 

SECTION 24 - REGULATION OF PAWNBROKERS 

24.1 License and Application Procedure 

The Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as the Licensing Authority for the Town of 
Wilmington may, upon petition, license such persons as it deems suitable to be pawnbrokers 
pursuant to law within the Town of Wilmington. Such licenses shall not be valid to protect 
the holder thereon in a building or place other than that designated in the license. All 
licenses shall contain a provision that the licensee agrees to abide by and be subject to all the 
provisions of this by-law, including all amendments thereof; 

24.1.1 - Applications 

Applications for such licenses shall be examined and reported upon by the Chief of 
Police or his designee(s). The applicant will be required to provide information as to 
whether or not the licensee has previously held a similar license in another 
jurisdiction, whether any such license was ever revoked, suspended or surrendered, 
and if so the reason therefore. 

24.1.2 - Filing and Expiration 

Applications for new licenses under this by-law may be filed at any time with the 
Licensing Authority. Applications for the re-issuance of licenses already existing 
should be filed at least thirty (30) days before the expiration of such license. All 
licenses issued under this rule shall expire annually on the first day of May. Persons 
whose licenses have expired and have not been re-issued will be liable to prosecution 
for engaging in any business for which the license is required. 

24.1.3 - Abandonment 

Whenever a licensee has failed to use the license for a continuous period of 30 days in 
the business at the place for which the license was issued, the Chief of Police, 
through his designee, will report such to the Licensing Authority, who may then 
deem the license abandoned and expired. Written notice of such shall be provided to 
the licensee who shall be given reasonable opportunity to present evidence that 
business under the license was in fact conducted during the 30-day period or 
evidence of mitigating factors which the Licensing Authority may in its discretion 
deem sufficient to revoke the finding of abandonment. 

24.2 - Records, Inspections, Signs, Hours of Operation 

24.2.1 - Records 

Every such licensee shall keep a solid bound book. Such book shall be legibly written 
in the English language. No entry in such book shall be erased, obliterated or 
defaced; the following information shall be recorded, at the time of every acquisition 
of any article taken in pawn: 

date and time of the transaction; 

name, street address, city or town of residence, and date of birth of the person 
or entity from whom the article is acquired; 
the dollar amount transacted; 

a particular description of the article, including inscriptions and dates, brand 

name, model and serial numbers, and other identifying information; 

a photograph of the article taken in pawn; 

a photograph of the person pawning the article. 



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24.2.2 - Photo Identification and Transaction Form 

The licensee shall require at the time of the transaction a government-issued form of 
photographic identification of the person from whom the article is taken in pawn to 
confirm that the name, address and date of birth are correct. The licensee shall also 
require such person to sign his name on a transaction form approved by the Chief of 
Police or his designee. A copy of the transaction form shall be retained permanently 
by the licensee and kept in alphabetical order as to the name of the person from 
whom the article was taken in pawn. 

24.2.3 - Inspections 

The shop of every licensee, all articles taken in pawn, and the book required by sub- 
section 24.2.1, above, shall at all times, during business hours be open to inspection 
by officers of the Wilmington Police Department or by any other person authorized by 
the Licensing Authority. Any such officer or person may during business hours enter 
upon any premises listed by a licensee under the by-law as the location at which such 
licensed business is conducted. Such officer or person may examine any and all 
articles taken in pawn kept or stored in or upon said property and all books and 
inventories relating thereto, and all such property, books and inventories shall be 
exhibited to any such officer or person upon demand. Refusal to permit inspection 
shall constitute a violation of this by-law. Such officer's or person's actions shall at 
all times conform to the established policies and procedures of the Wilmington Police 
Department. 

24.2.4 - Signs 

Every licensee shall post in a conspicuous place in the licensed premises a copy of 
this by-law to which the licensee shall affix his printed name and signature. Every 
licensee shall post in a conspicuous place the license issued under this by-law. No 
licensee shall place or maintain any signs upon or in connection with the licensed 
premises which indicate that any form of business is being conducted therein that is 
not specifically authorized by the license or that is contrary to any law, by-law or 
regulation. 

24.2.5 - Hours of Operation 

Any licensee may conduct the licensed business pursuant to this by-law only between 
the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. 

24.2.6 - Report of Stolen Property 

It shall be a condition of every license issued pursuant to this by-law that the 
licensee promptly report to the Wilmington Police Department the receipt of any 
property as to which there is a reasonable basis for believing that the property may 
have been stolen from its rightful owner. Such reasonable basis shall be presumed to 
exist where the property contains a serial number or other identifying information 
which has been removed, erased, deleted or defaced. 

24.3 - Transactions with Minors, Retention of Property 

24.3.1 - Transactions with Minors 

No licensee shall, directly or indirectly, take in pawn any property covered by this by- 
law, from any person who has not attained the age of eighteen (18) years old. 

24.3.2 - Holding Period 

No licensee shall permit any property taken by him in pawn to be sold, modified or 
removed from the licensed premises until a period of thirty (30) days has elapsed 
from the date of receipt unless the licensee has obtained written permission from the 
Wilmington Police Department. No such permission shall be granted until the 
expiration of at least two full days from the date of acquisition, purchase or receipt. 



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All property covered by this sub-section shall remain on the licensed premises and 
shall not be made available for purchase, acquisition or other transfer until the 
applicable holding period has expired. 

24.3.3 - Lost and Stolen Property 

If the Wilmington Police Department determines that there is probable cause to 
conclude that a particular item of property in the possession of a licensee has been 
stolen or if the Wilmington Police Department determines that a particular item of 
property in the possession of a licensee has been reported as lost or stolen, a stop 
order shall be issued to the licensee which shall bar any transfer of the subject 
property pending conclusion of an investigation or of any necessary legal proceedings 
commenced by the person claiming that the property is lost or stolen is positively 
identified by the person claiming to be the rightful owner, the property shall be held 
by the Wilmington Police Department in custody, according to existing policies and 
procedures of the Wilmington Police Department and pending the ultimate outcome 
of any legal proceedings regarding rightful ownership. If the Wilmington Police 
Department's investigation establishes that the property is in fact not lost or stolen, 
the stop order shall be immediately revoked. 

24.4 - Fees, Revocation, Violations, Rules and Regulations 

24.4.1 - License Fee 

For every license granted under the by-law and every re-issuance thereof, the 
licensee shall pay to the Licensing Authority a fee of one hundred ($100.00) dollars. 
In addition for every such license and every re-issuance thereof, the licensee shall 
furnish the bond required by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 77. 

24.4.2 - Revocation 

Any license issued pursuant to this by-law may be revoked at any time by the 
Licensing Authority, after notice to the licensee and a hearing if requested by the 
licensee, for violation of any provision of this by-law or of any rules or regulations 
issued hereunder, or for other cause. 

24.4.3 - Penalty for Violations 

The penalty for violations of this by-law shall be enforced in accordance with the 
provisions of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Revised as 
well as Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 2 ID. The penalty for a 
first violation of this By-Law shall be one hundred ($100.00) dollars, and for any 
second or subsequent offense violation shall be two hundred ($200.00) dollars. For 
any second or subsequent violation, the penalty shall apply to each individual item of 
property or incident that was not properly documented or permitted. 

24.5 - Severability 

If any provision of this by-law shall, in whole or in part, be held invalid for any reason, all 
other provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Chief Begonis stated this article has to do with stolen property recovery to owners. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted in 
the affirmative that the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Revised be 
amended by replacing existing Chapter 5, Section 24 in its entirety with a new Chapter 5, 
Section 24, which would establish regulations and requirements for the licensing and 
operation in the Town of pawnbrokers, as set forth in Article 24 of the 2011 Annual Town 
Meeting Warrant. 



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ARTICLE 25. (drawn #33) To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court and to request its 
representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in the form 
set forth below, it being the intent of the Town to authorize the General Court to make constructive 
changes to the text hereof, subject to the approval of the Town's Board of Selectmen, to accomplish the 
public policy purposes hereof; or take any other action related thereto: 

AN ACT EXEMPTING THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON FROM LIABILITY 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the Town of Wilmington shall not be found 
or held liable, with respect to the solid waste landfill and site located in the Town which is known as the 
"Maple Meadows Landfill", (a) pursuant to Chapter 21E of the General Laws or any regulations, 
guidelines, orders, or approvals promulgated thereunder; (b) pursuant to Chapter 111, Sections 150A or 
150A 1/2 of the General Laws or any regulations, guidelines, orders or approvals promulgated 
thereunder; (c) pursuant to Chapter 21C of the General Laws or any regulations, guidelines, orders or 
approvals promulgated thereunder; or (d) pursuant to the "Massachusetts Contingency Plan", Chapter 
310 of the Code of Massachusetts Regulations Section 40 or any guidelines, orders or approvals 
promulgated thereunder. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Champoux, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
unanimously that the Home Rule Petition set forth below be presented to the General Court, 
that the Town's representatives to the General Court be hereby requested to seek enactment of 
special legislation for the Town, it being the intent that the General Court be authorized to 
make constructive changes to the text hereof, subject to the approval of the Wilmington Board of 
Selectmen, to accomplish the public policy purposes as set forth below. 

AN ACT EXEMPTING THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON FROM LIABILITY 

Section 1. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the Town of Wilmington 
shall not be found or held liable, with respect to the solid waste landfill and site located in the 
Town which is known as the "Maple Meadows Landfill", (a) pursuant to Chapter 21E of the 
General Laws or any regulations, guidelines, orders, or approvals promulgated thereunder; (b) 
pursuant to Chapter 111, Sections 150A or 150A 1/2 of the General Laws or any regulations, 
guidelines, orders or approvals promulgated thereunder; (c) pursuant to Chapter 21C of the 
General Laws or any regulations, guidelines, orders or approvals promulgated thereunder; or (d) 
pursuant to the "Massachusetts Contingency Plan", Chapter 310 of the Code of Massachusetts 
Regulations Section 40 or any guidelines, orders or approvals promulgated thereunder. 

Section 2. This Act shall take effect upon passage. 

ARTICLE 26. (Taken up with Article 27) To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court 
and to request its representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for 
the Town in the form set forth below: 

AN ACT AMENDING THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

Section 7 of the Town Charter, St. 1950, c. 592, sees. 1, et seq., is amended by striking from the third 
sentence of such section 7 the following clause: 

", but shall be a resident of the town during his term of office." 

so that section 7, as amended, reads as follows: 

"SECTION 7. Appointment of Town Manager. The selectmen elected as provided herein 
shall appoint, as soon as practicable, for a term of three years, a Town Manager who shall be 
a person especially fitted by education, training and previous full time paid experience as a 
town or city manager or assistant manager, to perform the duties of the office. The Town 



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Manager shall be appointed without regard to his political beliefs. He need not be a resident 
of the town or this commonwealth when appointed, but shall not during the twelve months 
prior to his appointment have held any elective office in the Town of Wilmington. He may be 
appointed for successive terms of office. Before entering upon the duties of his office, the 
Town Manager shall be sworn to the faithful and impartial performance thereof by the Town 
Clerk, or a Justice of the Peace. He shall execute a bond in favor of the town for the faithful 
performance of his duties in such sum and with such surety or sureties as may be fixed or 
approved by the selectmen." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Mr. Newhouse explained this change would allow the Board of Selectmen as wide a field of 

candidates as possible. 

In opposition: Karl Sagal, James Burnham, Walter Collings, Mario Marchese 
In support: Ann Yurek, Mr. McCoy, Frank West. 

Michael Caira, Town Manager, stated he is in support and feels the residency requirement is very 
limiting in hiring someone. 

Bernard Nally, member of the Finance Committee, stated he would like to offer an amendment 
regarding female references within the body of the special legislation. 

AMENDMENT TO MAIN MOTION: On motion of Bernard Nally, and duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative to add female references to each male reference 
in the article and change to he/she or his/her references. 

MAIN MOTION: On motion of Ms. O'Connell, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted 98 in favor 13 opposed that the Town vote to petition the General Court and to request 
its representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town 
in the form set forth below: 

AN ACT AMENDING THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

Section 7 of the Town Charter, St. 1950, c. 592, sees. 1, et seq., is amended by striking from 
the third sentence of such section 7 the following clause: 

", but shall be a resident of the town during his term of office." 

so that section 7, as amended, reads as follows: 

"SECTION 7. Appointment of Town Manager. The selectmen elected as provided herein 
shall appoint; as soon as practicable, for a term of three years, a Town Manager who shall be 
a person especially fitted by education, training and previous full time paid experience as a 
town or city manager or assistant manager, to perform the duties of the office. The Town 
Manager shall be appointed without regard to his/her political beliefs. He/She need not be a 
resident of the town or this commonwealth when appointed, but shall not during the twelve 
months prior to his/her appointment have held any elective office in the Town of Wilmington. 
He/She may be appointed for successive terms of office. Before entering upon the duties of 
his/her office, the Town Manager shall be sworn to the faithful and impartial performance 
thereof by the Town Clerk, or a Justice of the Peace. He/She shall execute a bond in favor of 
the town for the faithful performance of his/her duties in such sum and with such surety or 
sureties as may be fixed or approved by the selectmen." 



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ARTICLE 27 . (drawn #25) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 7 of the Town Charter, 
Chapter 592, An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of Wilmington 
as follows: 

From: 

SECTION 7. Appointment of Town Manager. The selectmen elected as provided herein shall 
appoint, as soon as practicable, for a term of three years, a Town Manager who shall be a person 
especially fitted by education, training and by previous full time paid experience as a town or city 
manager or assistant manager, to perform the duties of the office. The Town Manager shall be 
appointed without regard to his political beliefs. He need not be a resident of the town or of this 
commonwealth when appointed, and shall not during the twelve months prior to his appointment 
have held any elective office in the Town of Wilmington, but shall be a resident of the town during 
his term of office. He may be appointed for successive terms of office. Before entering upon the 
duties of his office, the Town Manager shall be sworn to the faithful and impartial performance 
thereof by the Town Clerk, or a Justice of the Peace. He shall execute a bond in favor of the town for 
the faithful performance of his duties in such sum and with such surety or sureties as may be fixed 
or approved by the selectmen. 

To: 

SECTION 7. Appointment of Town Manager. The selectmen elected as provided herein shall 
appoint, as soon as practicable, for a term of three years, a Town Manager who shall be a person 
especially fitted by education, training and previous full time paid experience as a town or city 
manager or assistant manager, to perform the duties of the office. The Town Manager shall be 
appointed without regard to his political beliefs. He need not be a resident of the town or this 
commonwealth when appointed, but shall not during the twelve months prior to his appointment 
have held any elective office in the Town of Wilmington. He may be appointed for successive terms 
of office. Before entering upon the duties of his office, the Town Manager shall be sworn to the 
faithful and impartial performance thereof by the Town Clerk, or a justice of the Peace. He shall 
execute a bond in favor of the town for the faithful performance of his duties in such sum and with 
such surety or sureties as may be fixed or approved by the selectmen; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 
Article 27 was withdrawn by the petitioner, Mr. Lingenfelter. 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn #20) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3 of the Town Charter of 
the Town of Wilmington, by adding the following language "Elective Officers shall serve no more 
than two consecutive terms." To the end of Section 3 of the Town charter, as shown in the By-laws of 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

MOTION: Mr. Mark Nelson moved the adoption of Article 28, which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 28. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn #32) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington Revised, by adding the following new Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 
35, Fencing, as follows: 

FENCING 

SECTION 35. Fencing constructed on residential or commercial zoned property within the Town of 
Wilmington shall comply with the following: 

1. Comply with Massachusetts General Laws and Building Codes. 



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2. All fences must be installed with finished side facing adjoining property. 

3. Fences may be installed up to a property boundary line, but no portion of any holes 
excavated for the installation of fence posts shall be located on an abutting property 
and no portion of a fence may overhang an abutting property without written 
permission from the abutting property owner. 

4. All fencing will be of commercial manufacture and specifically designed for use as 
fencing, or if constructed by property owner or contractor, shall be constructed from 
materials likely to be serviceable for 20 or more years and of a design which is 
consistent with the use and character of both the property on which the fence is 
located and the abutting property (s). 

5. The color of fence construction materials and/or outer finish color is to be consistent 
with other on-site permanent structures which themselves are in conformance with 
zoning regulations. 

6. Wood fence posts for use with fencing greater than 3 feet in height shall be 
constructed of square posts of a minimum nominal dimension of 4 inches or round 
posts with a minimum nominal diameter of 5 inches. 

7. Safety or barricade type temporary fencing such as is typically used at construction 
sites to limit unauthorized access or observation, shall not be used at residential 
properties as perimeter fencing except during periods of excavation or construction 
and as necessary to comply with other applicable local, state or federal safety 
regulations. The residential restriction on the use of safety fencing does not apply to 
fencing installed around a swimming pool in conformance with other local and/or 
state safety regulations; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Mr. George Lingenfelter, petitioner, stated his neighbor has constructed a fence of plywood and blue 
tarp. Areas of the fence are over 6 feet at 6 foot 7 inches and 6 foot 5 inches. He is of the impression 
that any fence over 6 feet had to be permitted. He feels this is a spite fence. 

Al Spaulding, Building Inspector, stated he must rule in accordance with the Wilmington Zoning By- 
laws and the building laws of the Commonwealth. He stated fences 6 feet and under do not require a 
permit; over 6 feet requires a permit. 

In Opposition: Mario Marchese, Mr. Newhouse, Mr. Champoux, Mr. Caira. 

In Favor: Michael Bodnar, George Lingenfelter. 

MOTION: Mr. George Lingenfelter moved the adoption of Article 29, which was duly 
seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 29. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn #23) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 
20 (R-20), the following described parcel of land: 

The land at and known as 11 Harold Avenue, Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 as more fully 
described in a deed recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 2541, Page 486, 
said premises containing 60,015 square feet of land. 11 Harold Avenue is located on the Town's 
Assessor's Map as Map 23, Block 9, Parcel 109. 

Description 

The land in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, with the buildings thereon, being shown 
as Lot 9 Harold Avenue on "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Jackson Park, Wilmington, Mass., owned by 
Jackson Bros., Inc." dated September 23, 1969 by K. J. Miller Company, Inc., C. E.'s and Land 



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Surveyors, which Plan is duly recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 
109, Plan 157; said Lot being further bounded and described as follows: 



NORTHEASTERLY 



by Harold Avenue by two lines together measuring 295.47 feet, as 
shown on said Plan; 



EASTERLY 



by a curved line forming the junction of Harold Avenue and Reed 
Street, 37.26 feet; 



SOUTHEASTERLY 



by said Reed Street, by several lines at the turn-around, together 
measuring 199.72 feet; 



SOUTHWESTERLY 



by land of Chisholm, 287.19 feet; and 



NORTHWESTERLY 



by Lot 7, 203.72 feet. 



or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Planning Board Chairman Michael Sorrentino stated this is spot zoning. 

Representative James Miceli stated this abuts Shawsheen Commons and recommended approval. 

MOTION: On motion of petitioner Ronald Bodnar, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted 87 in favor 35 opposed to amend the Zoning By-laws and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to 
Residential 20 (R-20), the following described parcel of land: 

The land at and known as 11 Harold Avenue, Wilmington, Massachusetts as more fully 
described in a deed recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 2541, Page 
486, said premises containing 60,015 square feet of land. 11 Harold Avenue is located on the 
Town's Assessor's Map as Map 23, Block 9, Parcel 109. (Passes by two-thirds requirement) 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn #26) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 20 (R-20) to General 
Business (GB) the following parcels of land; or take any other action related thereto. 

The land known as 56 Ballardvale Street, Wilmington, MA 01887 containing 1.06 acres of land and 
64 Ballardvale Street, Wilmington, MA 01887 containing 1.25 acres of land. As more fully described 
in the deeds recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds Book 4184, Page 321; Book 18160, Page 
75 and Book 18160, Page 76 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Ellen Sawyer, petitioner, stated that her property has changed over the years. Her property is now 
surrounded by Avalon Oaks and feels her property value has decreased. She would like to sell this 
property and buy another house in Wilmington. 

Jose Carvalho, co-petitioner, said he is in support. He applied to re-finance his house and was told 
that his property value dropped due to Avalon. 



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Michael Sorrentino stated the Planning Board is strongly recommending disapproval as the area is 
residential and not industrial. He continued by saying he did not believe that Avalon Oaks was 
causing the decrease in property value. 

Mr. McCoy said it makes sense to approve this article. 

Mr. Caira stated he did not feel approval of this article was in the best interest of the town. 
Mr. Doherty spoke in opposition. 

Mr. Peter Turmenal, speaking for the petitioners, stated he did a feasibility study and the property 
was best suited for a hotel. 

Mr. Sorrentino once again rose in opposition, but said the Planning Board never saw a feasibility 
study. 

Mr. Caira read from the Zoning Ordinance Book stating this use would not be allowed. 

Mr. Marchese, Ms. Marion Amber and Mr. Erickson all spoke in favor 

MOTION: On motion of Ms. Sawyer, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 58 in 
favor 66 opposed to the approval of Article 31. (Motion Fails) 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn #17) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into an 
agreement, the terms of which shall be determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise 
dispose of, all or part of the following described parcels, following a determination made by the Town 
Manager that the land is not needed for any municipal purpose, and in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, and other applicable 
law; the parcel located on Wildwood Street, described in the Assessor's records as Map 61, Parcel 6; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended disapproval of this Article and a recommendation that this parcel is 
not surplus to the needs of the Town due to its proximity to the Wildwood Street School. 

MOTION: It was moved to pass over this article. Voted. 

ARTICLE 33. (drawn #31) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into an 
agreement, the terms of which shall be determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise 
dispose of, all or part of the following described parcels, following a determination made by the Town 
Manager that the land is not needed for any municipal purpose, and in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, and other applicable 
law. The parcels are located on Faneuil Drive, described in the Assessor's records as Map 44, Parcels 
166 and 167; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article based on Planning Board 
recommendation. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article if the determination is made that the land is 
surplus to the needs of the Town. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Robert Peterson, for the petitioner, and duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted unanimously to approve the sale of town owned land described as 
Assessor's Map 44, Parcels 166 and 167 and further that the minimum fair market value is 
established at $150,000. 



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ARTICLE 34. (drawn #18) To see if the Town will vote to amend, update and revise the "Official 
Map" of the Town of Wilmington, dated January 1, 1973, prepared for the Planning Board by the 
Engineering Department and adopted by the Town of Wilmington under Article 17 of the Warrant 
for Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
on August 20, 1973, in Book of Plans M, Plan 712, to show the now existing public ways, parks and 
private ways in accordance with the Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41, Sections 8 IE, F and 
G, provided said map has been lawfully adopted, maintained and is still valid; or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

MOTION: Mr. Mark Nelson moved the adoption of Article 34, which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 34. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn #29) To see if the Town will vote that in the event, at the current Town 
Meeting, the voters approve the construction of a NEW High School and the increase in taxes 
required to finance the project, I request the voters to give senior citizens having at least a 10 year 
residency a tax break on the financing increase to their taxes as follows; @ ages 65 years — 80 years 
there shall be a 75% reduction on the proposed new increase of taxation and at ages 80 years and 
over no new school taxes shall be billed; or take any other action related thereto. 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Article 35 was withdrawn by the petitioner, Mr. Bodnar. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn #29) To see if the Town will vote to establish a disabled veterans tax work-off 
program and raise and appropriate a sum of $10,000 for the purpose of providing disabled veterans 
work opportunities for services rendered to the town in accordance with said program; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

MOTION: Mr. Mark Nelson moved the adoption of Article 36, which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 36. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:40 p.m. with 213 registered voters and 31 non-voters attending. 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION - DECEMBER 6 5 2011 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Boutwell School (Precincts 1 and 2), Wildwood School 
(Precincts 3 and 4) and the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 5 and 6), Tuesday the sixth day of 
December, A.D. 2011 at 7:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 8:00 a.m. and shall be 
closed at 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

Question: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 

Proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds 
issued in order to pay the costs of designing, permitting, constructing, equipping and 
furnishing a new high school including the payment of costs for any necessary site 
improvements, said high school to be located at 159 Church Street, Wilmington, MA." 



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In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. 
George, at the Town Hall, Board of Registrar Member Priscilla Ward at the Boutwell School and 
Board of Registrar Member Alice Hooper at the Wildwood School. 

All voting equipment was in place in each precinct. The checkers were prepared with their voting 
lists and everything was in readiness at 8:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 

Results were as follows: 



The polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The results of the special election were ready by 8:30 
p.m. with an overwhelmingly positive vote for the construction of a new high school. The total 
number of votes cast was 5,016, which represented 33% of Wilmington's registered voters. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 10, 2011 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the 
By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town qualified to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Lawrence H. Cushing 
Gymnasium, Wilmington High School, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the tenth day of December 2011 at 10:30 a.m., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

With a quorum present at 11:45 a.m. James Stewart, Town Moderator, opened the meeting with the 
Pledge of Allegiance. 

MOTION: On motion of Chairman Louis Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative to dispense with further reading of the Warrant and 
take up and make reference to each article by number. 

ARTICLE 1. (drawn #1) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from 
available funds, an amount of money to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager and 
High School Building Committee for the purpose of paying the costs of designing, permitting, 
constructing, equipping and furnishing a new high school including the payment of costs for any 
necessary site improvements, said high school to be located at 159 Church Street, Wilmington, which 
school facility shall have an anticipated useful life as an educational facility for the instruction of 
school children of at least 50 years, and for which the Town may be eligible for a school construction 
grant from the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA). The Town acknowledges that the 
MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by 
the MSBA, and any project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received 
from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town. Any grant that the Town may receive 
from the MSBA for the project shall not exceed the lesser of (1) fifty-two and forty-seven hundredths 
percent (52.47%) of eligible, approved project costs, as determined by the MSBA, or (2) the total 
maximum grant amount determined by the MSBA; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 
Total: 



3,778 
1,238 





5,016 



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A brief presentation was done by Dore and Whittier, architects for the project. 

Margaret Kane, Chairperson, School Committee, introduced Joanne Benton, Superintendent of 
Schools. Mrs. Benton explained to the large audience in attendance the need for a new high school to 
give students a 21 st century education. Mrs. Benton deferred to Town Manager, Michael Caira, to 
discuss the appropriations needed. 

Mr. Caira discussed the total cost of the project to be $81,563,115. He continued by saying the 
positive vote at Special Election on December 6, 2011 allowed the town to increase tax levy limit. The 
estimated local share will be $44,190,758. Mr. Caira estimated the average annual cost to the 
homeowner over the amortization of the bond for 25 years would be $164.14. This calculation is 
based on the assessed value of the average home. 

Josephine King, 230 Burlington Avenue, stated she felt the footprint of the school should be moved 
100 feet to protect the wetlands better. She also asked if a buffer would be placed and was told there 
would be. 

James Lemay, 25 Shady Lane Drive, gave a scenario of the tax base of different communities and 
stated that he was in favor of the project. 

Joanne Shukis, 7 Cedar Street, stated she was in opposition due to the bad economy. 

Selectman Michael J. Newhouse, stated that he feels this is the right time. He continued by saying 
this is also the right economy. 

MOVE THE QUESTION: 

MOTION: On motion of Daniel Veerman, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
in the affirmative to move the question. 

MAIN MOTION: 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
1,426 in favor and 31 opposed to appropriate the amount of Eighty-One Million Five 
Hundred Sixty-Three Thousand One Hundred Fifteen Dollars ($81.563,115) for the purpose 
of paying the costs of designing, permitting, constructing, equipping and furnishing a new 
high school, including the payment for costs of any necessary site improvements, said high 
school to be located at 159 Church Street, Wilmington, including the payment of all costs 
incidental or related thereto (the "Project"), which school facility shall have an anticipated 
useful life as an educational facility for the instruction of school children for at least 50 years, 
and for which the Town may be eligible for a grant from the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority ("MSBA"), said amount to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager 
and High School Building Committee. To meet this appropriation the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said amount under M.G.L. Chapter 44, or pursuant to any other 
enabling authority. The Town acknowledges that the MSBA's grant program is a non- 
entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any 
project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received from the 
MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town; provided further that any grant that the 
Town may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser of (1) Fifty-Five 
and Nineteen hundredths percent (55.19%) of eligible, approved project costs, as determined 
by the MSBA, or (2) the total maximum grant amount determined by the MSBA; provided 
that any appropriation hereunder shall be subject to and contingent upon an affirmative vote 
of the Town to exempt the amounts required for the payment of interest and principal on 
said borrowing from the limitations on taxes imposed by M.G.L. Chapter 59, Section 21C 
(Proposition 2/4); and that the amount of borrowing authorized pursuant to this vote shall be 
reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Project Funding Agreement that may be 
executed between the Town and the MSBA. 



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Motion for Reconsideration was requested. 

RECONSIDERATION: On motion of Kevin MacDonald, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington defeated the motion for reconsideration. 

ARTICLE 2. (drawn #4) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by purchase, gift or eminent domain the parcel of land located off Church Street in Wilmington, 
containing approximately 10,299 square feet and shown as Parcel X on a plan entitled "Plan of Land, 
First Baptist Church, 173 Church St., Wilmington, Mass., Map 63, Lot 9 - September 9, 2011" on file 
with the Town Clerk's Office for school purposes and other general municipal purposes; and further 
to see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow pursuant to any applicable statute or transfer 
from available funds, a sum of money for such purposes; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Mr. Caira stated a vote on this article would enable the Town to move forward with a purchase and 
sale agreement for the property at a cost of $15,000. This land is needed for the high school project. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Louis Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted in the affirmative that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by purchase, 
gift or eminent domain the parcel of land located off Church Street in Wilmington, containing 
approximately 10,299 square feet and shown as Parcel X on a plan entitled "Plan of Land, 
First Baptist Church, 173 Church St., Wilmington, Mass., Map 63, Lot 9 - September 9, 
2011" for school purposes and other general municipal purposes; and further appropriate 
from the general fund, the amount of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000.00) to acquire said 
property. 

James Stewart, Moderator, stated that Articles 3 and 4 would be taken together. 

ARTICLE 3. (drawn #3) To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to Chapter 40, Section 58 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, to authorize the Town of Wilmington, through its Town Manager and 
Town Counsel, (A) to impose and record a lien against private real property for municipal charges 
that arise or have arisen from the trimming, cutting and/or removal of trees or bushes at such 
property by the Town's Tree Warden and his or her deputies, where (i) such action is deemed 
necessary because the affected trees or bushes have been found to obstruct, endanger, or hinder 
pedestrians or others traveling on public ways, and (ii) such personnel have been duly authorized to 
take such action by recorded vote of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 
87, Section 5, and (iii) the owner of such property has failed or refused to perform such trimming, 
cutting or removal following notice given to him or her by the Town of Wilmington, and (iv) the 
property owner has failed or refused to pay the amount of such charges when an invoice, presented 
to him or her, becomes due; such municipal charges to include the cost of performing the work by or 
for the Town of Wilmington, and any safety and/or security measures related to the performance of 
such work; and (B) to add the remaining unpaid amount of such municipal charges to the property 
owner's next tax bill; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend The By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised to insert as Section 35 of Chapter 5 a new provision, as follows: 

LIEN FOR CERTAIN TREE REMOVAL COSTS 

SECTION 35. The Town Manager and Town Counsel may (A) impose and record a lien against 
private real property for municipal charges that arise or have arisen from the trimming, cutting 
and/or removal of trees or bushes at such property by the Town's Tree Warden and his or her 
deputies, where (i) such action is deemed necessary because the affected trees or bushes have been 
found to obstruct, endanger, or hinder pedestrians or others traveling on public ways, and (ii) such 
personnel have been duly authorized to take such action by recorded vote of the Wilmington Board 

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of Selectmen pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 87, Section 5, and (iii) the owner of such property has 
failed or refused to perform such trimming, cutting or removal following notice given to him or her 
by the Town of Wilmington, and (iv) the owner has failed or refused to pay the amount of such 
charges when an invoice, presented to the owner, becomes due; such municipal charges may 
include the cost of performing the work by or for the Town of Wilmington, and any safety and/or 
security measures related to the performance of such work; and (B) add the remaining unpaid 
amount of such municipal charges to the property owner's next tax bill. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Debra Russo asked about electrical wires in the tree limbs. Randi Holland was concerned with 
trees in the right of way. 

Mr. Caira stated this proposed by-law is to protect the taxpayer. If a homeowner has a tree on 
their property and it is a danger to the public, and the homeowner refuses to have the tree 
removed, at that time the town will go on private property and remove the tree. 

MOVE THE QUESTION 

It was moved and seconded from the floor to end debate on Articles 3 and 4. So voted. 

MOTION: (Article 3) On motion of Selectman Michael V. McCoy, and duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative that the Town of Wilmington, through its 
Town Manager and Town Counsel, may (A) impose and record a lien against private real 
property for municipal charges that arise or have arisen from the trimming, cutting and/or 
removal of trees or bushes at such property by the Town's Tree Warden and his or her 
deputies, where (i) such action is deemed necessary because the affected trees or bushes 
have been found to obstruct, endanger, or hinder pedestrians or others traveling on public 
ways, and (ii) such personnel have been duly authorized to take such action by recorded 
vote of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 87, Section 5, and 
(iii) the owner of such property has failed or refused to perform such trimming, cutting or 
removal following notice given to him or her by the Town of Wilmington, and (iv) the owner 
has failed or refused to pay the amount of such charges when an invoice, presented to the 
owner, becomes due; such municipal charges to include the cost of performing the work by 
or for the Town of Wilmington, and any safety and/or security measures related to the 
performance of such work; and (B) add the remaining unpaid amount of such municipal 
charges to the property owner's next tax bill. 

MOTION: (Article 4) On motion of Selectman Michael L. Champoux, and duly seconded, 
the Town of Wilmington voted in the affirmative to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Wilmington, Revised to insert as Section 35 of Chapter 5 a new provision, as 
follows: 

LIEN FOR CERTAIN TREE REMOVAL COSTS 

SECTION 35. The Town Manager and Town Counsel may (A) impose and record a lien 
against private real property for municipal charges that arise or have arisen from the 
trimming, cutting and/or removal of trees or bushes at such property by the Town's Tree 
Warden and his or her deputies, where (i) such action is deemed necessary because the 
affected trees or bushes have been found to obstruct, endanger, or hinder pedestrians or 
others traveling on public ways, and (ii) such personnel have been duly authorized to take 
such action by recorded vote of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen pursuant to M.G.L. 
Chapter 87, Section 5, and (iii) the owner of such property has failed or refused to perform 
such trimming, cutting or removal following notice given to him or her by the Town of 
Wilmington, and (iv) the owner has failed or refused to pay the amount of such charges when 
an invoice, presented to the owner, becomes due; such municipal charges may include the 
cost of performing the work by or for the Town of Wilmington, and any safety and/or security 
measures related to the performance of such work; and (B) add the remaining unpaid 
amount of such municipal charges to the property owner's next tax bill. 



-165- 



ARTICLE 5. (drawn #3) To see whether the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
an agreement, the terms of which shall be determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise 
dispose of, all or part of the following described parcel, following a determination made by the Town 
Manager that the land is not needed for any municipal purpose, and in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, and any other 
applicable law. The parcel is located on Boutwell Street, described in the assessor's records as Map 
19, Parcel 52; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article based on Property Review Board 
recommendation and declaration of surplus by the Town Manager. 

The parcel was not considered to be surplus to the needs of the Town by the Town Manager. Article 
withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 6. (drawn #2) To see whether the Town will vote to preserve Wilmington High School 
and prevent it from being demolished; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Mr. MacDonald presented his article reiterating once again his opposition to the design of the new 
high school. 

Other residents asked about the oil and its affect on the soil and building the new high school. 

Mr. Caira stated that all the borings and testing has been done with the drilling to 14' under the 
Activity and Use Limitation Area (AUL). 

MOVE THE QUESTION 

A motion was made from the floor and seconded to move the question. So voted. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. MacDonald to adopt Article 6 which was duly seconded, the 
Town of Wilmington voted to defeat Article 6. Motion fails. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. with an attendance of registered voters of 1,468 and 42 non- 
voters. 



-166- 



Directory of Officials - January 1, 2012 



Board of Selectmen 



Louis Cimaglia, IV, Chairman 
Michael L. Champoux 
Michael J. Newhouse 
Michael V. McCoy 
Judith L. O'Connell 



2013 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2014 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



2012 



School Committee 



Margaret A. Kane, Chairman 
Leslee A. Quick, Vice Chairman 
Robert L. Hayes, Secretary 
Mario S. Marchese 
A. Quincy Vale 
Kathleen M. Carroll 
Virginia M. Bonish 



2013 
2014 
2013 
2012 
2012 
2013 
2014 



Superintendent of Schools Joanne M. Benton 



Finance Committee 



John F. Doherty, III, Chairman 2014 

Theresa M. Manganelli, Vice Chairman 2014 

Victoria L. Ellsworth, Secretary 2013 

Richard K. Hayden 2012 

Bernard P. Nally, Jr. 2012 

William J. Wallace 2012 

Patrick T. Hughes 2013 

Jordan H. Weiner 2013 

Robert P. Palmer 2014 



-167- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2012 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals, Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 2016 

Robert H. Spencer 2012 

Daniel J. Veerman 2013 

Anthony J. Barletta, Jr. 2014 

Edward P. Loud 2015 



Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor 
Anthony E. Krzeminski 
Roger J. Lessard 

By-Law Study Committee 

Robert H. Spencer, Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Scott C. Garrant 

Walter J. Kaminski 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Selectman Liaison 

Sharon A. George, Ex-Officio 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Sandra S. Curtin 
Neil Ellis 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

Adele C. Passmore, Chairman 2013 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 2012 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 2011 

Margaret A. St. Onge 2012 

Julia E. Doten 2013 

Cemetery Commission 

Cynthia A. McCue, Chairman 2013 

Judith A. Simmons 2012 

Pasquale D'Antonio 2014 

Conservation Commission 

Donald J. Pearson, Chairman 2013 

Frank J. Ingram, Vice Chairman 2013 

Charles R. Fiore 2012 

Vincent Licciardi 2012 

Julie A. Flynn 2014 

Sharon M. Kelley Parrella 2014 

Vacancy 2013 



Term 
Expires 



Disabilities, Commission on 

Phyllis P. Genetti, Chairman 2014 

Frank A. Botte 2013 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 2013 
Selectman Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 

John J. King, Chairman 2013 

Mary D'Eon 2012 

Albert J. LaValle 2012 

Francis Sferrazza 2013 

Mary Smith 2013 

Stanley Dancewicz, Jr. 2014 

Jane A. Hill 2014 



Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
Michael R. Begonis 
Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 
George W. Hooper, II 
Michael Morris 
Shelly M. Newhouse 
Donald N. Onusseit 
John T. Spaulding 
Michael J. Woods 



Health, Board of 

Elizabeth E. Sabounjian, Chairman 2014 

James A. Ficociello, V. Chairman 2013 

Jane A. Williams- Vale 20 1 2 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 2014 

Kathleen Black-Reynolds 2012 

William J. Campbell 2012 

Stephen Lawrenson 2013 

Bonny A. Smith 2013 

Gerald R. Duggan 2014 

Julie O'Brien Fennell 2014 

Housing Authority 

Robert C. DiPasquale, Chairman 2013 

Stacie A. Murphy 2012 

Leona C. Bombard 2015 

Gregory B. Bendel 2016 
Vacancy (State Appointee) 



-168- 



Term 
Expires 

Library Trustees 

Donald J. Pearson, Chairman 2013 
Eileen L. MacDougall, Vice Chairman 2011 
James M. Lemay 2011 
Karen E. Campbell 2012 
Joan S. Grady 2012 
Susanne L. Clarkin 2013 
James Banda, Sr., Trustee Emeritus 
Anne Buzzell, Trustee Emeritus 



Permanent Building Committee 

George W. Hooper, II, Chairman 2014 

Diane M. Allan 2012 

Paul J. Melaragni 2012 

Joseph J. Parrella, Jr. 2013 

John C. Holloway 2014 



Planning Board 

Michael A. Sorrentino, Chairman 2012 

Ann L. Yurek, Clerk 2014 

James F. Banda, Jr. 2013 

Randi R. Holland 2015 

Brian T. Corrigan 2016 



Recreation Commission 

C. Michael Burns, Chairman 

Sheila Burke, Vice Chairman 

Laurie Robarge 

Charles Biondo 

Mark Kennedy 



2014 
2012 
2012 
2013 
2013 



Term 
Expires 



Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 

Robert G. Peterson 
James M. Gillis 



2013 
2012 



Registrars, Board of 

Priscilla R. Ward, Chairman 
Alice M. Hooper 
Edward L. Sousa 
Sharon A. George, Clerk 



2013 
2012 
2014 



Scholarship Fund Committee 

Joanne M. Benton, Chairman 

Susanne L. Clarkin 

Carol A. King 

Michele Caira Nortonen 

Robert G. Peterson 

Lisa A. Troy 



2014 
2014 
2014 
2014 
2014 
2014 



Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris, Chairman 
Michelle L. Gomes 
Pamela L. MacKenzie 



2012 
2012 
2012 



Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Joseph J. Balliro, Jr., Chairman 2013 

George R. Allan 2011 

Matthew J. Kane 2012 



Redevelopment Authority Wilmington Arts Council 

Sidney R. Kaizer 2012 Jane M. Crane, Chairman 2013 

Patrick M. Keogan 2016 Barbara Forrestall* 2012 

Jean A. Chang 2012 

Marguerite Elia 2012 

Linda Molloy 2012 

Sara B. Campbell 2012 



* Advisory Board Member 



-169- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2012 



Wilmington Election Officers - Term Expires Annually 



Precinct 1 

Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Priscilla R. Ward, Deputy Warden 
Mary Schultz, Deputy Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Wendy Diecidue, Alternate 
Carolyn Kenney, Alternate 
Kim Mytych, Alternate 
Ann Peters, Alternate 

Precinct 3 

Patricia McKenna, Warden 
Shirley Brush, Inspector 
Loretta R. Caira, Inspector 
Carol King, Inspector 
Janice Quandt, Inspector 
Ruth Holbrook, Alternate 
Taryn Martiniello, Alternate 
Michele Nortonen, Alternate 
Susan Delaney, Alternate 
Alma DAntonio, Alternate 

Precinct 5 

Nita Beals, Warden 
Maureen Fiorenza, Deputy Warden 
Jeanne Grant, Inspector 
Cynthia McCue, Inspector 
Robert Beals, Alternate 
Beverly Dalton, Alternate 
Jane Crane, Alternate 
Kathleen Scanlon, Alternate 
Cynthia Walsh, Alternate 



Precinct 2 

Alfred Antinarelli, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Deputy Warden 
Elizabeth Roberts, Deputy Clerk 
Helen Brady, Inspector 
Andrea Houser, Inspector 
Robert J. Sweet, Inspector 
Susan McNamara, Alternate 
Joyce Murray, Alternate 
Gayle Regan, Alternate 
Audrey E. Riddle, Alternate 

Precinct 4 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Deputy Warden 
Marilyn West, Deputy Clerk 
Gail Gass, Inspector 
Phyllis Hailey, Inspector 
Joanna E. Clayton, Alternate 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Alternate 
Mary Lunetta, Alternate 
Deborah Steen, Alternate 

Precinct 6 

Donald Armstrong, Warden 
Jean C. Lefavour, Inspector 
Mary F. Kiesinger, Inspector 
Jean Mazzocca, Inspector 
Lillian Gigliotti, Alternate 
Rosemary Greco, Alternate 
Laurie Mathews, Alternate 
Joann Roberto, Alternate 
Mary Ann Steen, Alternate 
Margaret White, Alternate 



-170- 



Officers and Department Heads - January 1, 2012 



Accountant 


Michael Morris 


694-2029 


Administrative Assistant 


Beverly J. Dalton 


658-3311 


Animal Control/Inspector 


Ellen G. Davis Sawyer 


658-7845 


Assistant Town Manager 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658-3311 


Assessor, Principal 


Humphrey J. Moynihan 


658-3675 


Community Development Program Director 


Carole S. Hamilton 


658-9843 


Constable 


Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 


658-6140 


Elderly Services Director 


Theresa Marciello 


657-7595 


Emergency Management Director 


Edward G. Bradbury 


658-3346 


rjiigi nti tiring i_/ireci<ur 


Anthony Pronski 


fino /MQQ 


Fence Viewer 


Anthony Pronski 


658-4499 




John T Snauldinp 

Willi A ■ l 'Ijll L11V.1111C 


658-4531 


r ire uniei 


Kdward G. Bradbury 


era ooAd 


Housing Authority Executive Director 


A IS T T * 1 

Maureen Hickey 


658-8531 


T i. fn '1J' 

Inspector 01 Buildings 


John r. Spaulding 


658-4531 


T " U - 

Librarian 


Christina A. Stewart 


658-2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 


Michael V. McCoy 


658-3311 


AntboTitv AnvKnrv nnflrn 






Mass. Water Resource Authority 


Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


Advisory Board 






Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Carole S. Hamilton 


658-8238 


Middlesex Canal Commission 


Betty M. Bigwood 


657-7870 




Michael J. Mclnnis 




Museum Curator 


Theresa McDermott 


658-5475 


Planning/Conservation Director 


Carole S. Hamilton 


658-8238 


Plumbing and Gas Inspector 


Paul Raffi 


658-4531 


Police Chief 


Michael R. Begonis 


658-5071 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


George W. Hooper, II 


658-3017 


Public Health Director 


Shelly M. Newhouse 


658-4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Tina R. Scanlon, R.N. 


694-2041 


Public Works Superintendent 


Donald N. Onusseit 


658-4481 


Reading Municipal Light Dept. 


George W. Hooper, II 


658-3017 


Advisory Board 


Thomas A. Ollila 


658-4858 


Recreation Director 


Deborah E. Cipriani 


658-4270 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Charles H. Carroll 


(617) 727-3480x21131 


Town Clerk 


Sharon A. George 


658-2030 


Town Counsel 


John C. Foskett 


(617) 951-2300 


Town Manager 


Michael A. Caira 


658-3311 


Treasurer/Collector 


Pamela L. MacKenzie 


658-3531 


Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 


Louis Cimaglia, IV 


694-2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Michael J. Woods 


658-4711 


Wiring Inspector 


Frederick Sutter 


658-4531 




-171- 





TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2 nd & 4 th Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as the 
Town's chief elected officials. The Board is responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of 
Appeals, the Town Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for issuing 
numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer licenses and licenses to operate automobile 
dealerships. The Selectmen serve on a part-time basis. 

Phone 978- 658-3311 

Louis Cimaglia, IV, Chairman 
Michael L. Champoux 

Michael V. McCoy 
Michael J. Newhouse 
Judith L. O'Connell 

Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 978 - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He supervises and directs the 
administration of all departments, boards and commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Moderator, Finance Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of Voters. His 
duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of staff and members of certain boards and 
commissions; attendance at all regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and 
recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing the Town in all 
litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation and 
administration of a comprehensive annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on 
behalf of the Town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 978 - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager serves as the town's risk manager responsible for arranging the purchase of 
all lines of municipal insurance, chairing the town Safety Committee meetings, arranging for loss control 
training and working with insurance carriers to respond to claims against the town; serves in a human 
resources role informing employees about the various benefits available to them and establishing practices 
to comply with state and federal employment regulations; serves as a resource for departments seeking 
guidance on compliance with state procurement regulations; serves as the town's "point person" on cable 
licensing and assists the Town Manager with municipal administration including annual budget 
preparation, collective bargaining with unions and responding to questions or requests for assistance from 
residents. 

Town Clerk - Sharon A. George - 978 - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping of records and documents, the 
issuance of licenses and the administration of elections. In terms of the Town records the Clerk records 
proceedings of all town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital statistics and Filing 
Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, 
dog licenses, etc. The Clerk is the Chief Election Official for all elections and serves as clerk of the Board of 
Registrars. 




-172- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 978 - 658-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve Town funds. The department 
prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all bills owed by the Town. The Accountant maintains 
the complete official financial records of the Town and prepares other financial records and reports as 
needed. The office provides information for the annual audit and bond ratings. Additionally, this office 
participates in the preparation of the annual budget. The Accounting Department is also responsible for the 
management of the Town's Information Systems, including financial systems, electronic mail and the Town's 
website. 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 978 - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property taxes necessary to meet 
appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated equitably on the basis of the property owned by each 
taxpayer. The assessors are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property 
within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, except for property qualifying for 
preferential assessments such as forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: 
(1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised from property taxation and (3) 
property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - Pamela L. MacKenzie - 978-658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of monies due the Town including 
property and motor vehicle excise taxes and charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This 
department is responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector monitors the Town's 
cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The department serves as custodian of all 
Town funds. All municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax title and foreclosure 
proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the Treasurer/Collector. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Carole S. Hamilton - 978 - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake studies of land use, economic 
development, housing, transportation and other matters related to community development; compile and 
maintain maps, statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual proposals for 
development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations and zoning by-law; and prepare 
applications and administer grants related to planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and enforcement of the 
Wetlands Protection Act Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 131, Section 40. The Act is intended to 
protect seven public interest issues related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection 
of public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention of pollution, protection of 
fisheries and protection of land containing shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include 
reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with the Town and State wetlands 
statutes. In addition, the department manages several pieces of property throughout Town which have been 
placed into the Town's custody as conservation land. 

Building Inspector - John T. Spaulding - 978 - 658-4531 

The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the State Uniform Building Code 
and certain other State codes. This department provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, 
architects, engineers, contractors and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans and 
permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, gas fitting and wiring inspections. 



-173- 



Director of Public Health - Shelly M. Newhouse - 978 - 658-4298 



The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services include restaurant, retail food 
stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. 
In addition, the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, septic system 
inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizens complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and 
noise pollution and hazardous waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. This includes 
an annual rabies clinic for dogs and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other 
diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In 
addition, the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of the Town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Edward G. Bradbury - 978 - 658-3346 - Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The Wilmington Fire Department is responsible for providing fire protection and emergency medical services 
to the Town of Wilmington. Statutory and Regulatory Laws and regulations are enforced through the Fire 
prevention Office. 

Inspections of fire alarm systems, smoke detectors, sprinkler systems, flammable and combustible liquids 
and explosives. Propane tank installations, oil burner installations and hazardous materials conducted by 
fire prevention and shift personnel. 

Police Chief - Michael R. Begonis - 978 - 658-5071 - Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the protection of people and property 
through enforcement of criminal laws and traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by- 
laws and provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services are provided 
through this department. 

Dispatch Supervisor - April E. Kingston - 978 - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The Public Safety Dispatch Department is responsible for providing emergency communications for the 
Wilmington Police and Fire Departments. The department answers all E-9-1-1 lines, dispatches police, fire 
and EMS as needed and handles all incoming business calls for personnel of both departments. The 
department also assists other town departments in handling their after hours emergency calls such as water 
main breaks, animal control calls, notification to the DPW of road conditions and other public service needs. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 978 - 658-4481 or 978 - 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse 
and recycling. The Highway Division is responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, 
parking areas and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, boards and 
commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage problems, review of subdivision plans and 
inspection of subdivision roadway construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the 
maintenance of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is responsible for the 
Town's public shade and ornamental trees and maintenance of the trees on the Town Common. The Public 
Works Department is also responsible for the operation of the Town's water supply, distribution, treatment 
systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection systems and the septic disposal station. 
These responsibilities are assumed by the Water & Sewer Department. The Department operates two water 
treatment plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal Environmental Agency (EPA). 



-174- 



In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program for many household items, 
maintains a composting center for brush and leaf disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste 
collection. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Superintendent - George W. Hooper, II - 978 - 658-3017 or 978 - 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 714,000 square feet of building space. 
The department provides custodial services for all school buildings and most of the general government 
buildings. In addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all of the Town's 
municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete set-up at all Town elections and the annual 
and special town meetings. 

HUMAN SERVICES 
Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 978 - 657-7595 

Wilmington Department of Elderly Services is committed to continuously advocating, promoting and 
providing services to Wilmington citizens 60 and over. These services contribute to the well-being of our 
seniors in the following ways: Information and Referral, Care Planning and Management, Health and 
Wellness Services, Transportation Service, Educational Programs, Counseling and Family Support Services, 
Financial and Health Insurance Counseling and Medical Advocacy. 

The Buzzell Senior Center has an environment that is not only inviting, but also safe and enjoyable for 
elderly residents to be able to communicate with their peers and participate in many daily classes and 
activities. 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 978 - 658-2967 

The Wilmington Memorial Library has over 65,000 items including books and audio books, movies and 
music, games and software, newspapers and magazines. With a library card, residents can access 
authoritative databases, downloadable audio books and ebooks. The library is a member of the Merrimack 
Valley Library Consortium (MVLC), a system of 35 libraries with a common catalog providing access to more 
than 3 million items. Items owned by MVLC libraries may be requested for delivery to our library. The 
library has computer workstations with high speed Internet connection, Microsoft Office and black/white or 
color printing. Wireless access is available throughout the library. Scanners, copiers and a fax machine are 
also available. With supplemental support from the Friends of the Library, the library offers a variety of 
programming for all ages year round. The calendar of events can be found on the library's web site 
www . wilmlibrary . org . 

Recreation Director - Deborah E. Cipriani - 978 - 658-4270 

The goal of the Wilmington Recreation Department is to offer high quality, relevant and affordable programs 
and services to the residents of Wilmington. We provide a variety of leisure services that are under constant 
review, with a focus on evolving offerings to keep pace with local demand and changing trends. We offer 
classes for all ages, sports and other programs to promote physical health and day and overnight trips to 
provide life-long education and entertainment. Our commitment is to excellence in our programming, 
presented with superior customer service. 

Veterans' Agent - Louis Cimaglia. rV - 978 - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans and their dependents who 
qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of 
cash grants to cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent also offers 
assistance in applying for pensions and other programs administered by the United States Veterans 
Administration. 



-175- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 

Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 


Date 


Room 


Building 


Time 


a nnri a t o T) / \ \ o TA / \ 17 

ArrLALo, rJOAKD Or 


2nd Wednesday 


9 


rp t y _ 11 

lown Hall 


7:00 p 


m. 


AKlb, LOUJNL1L rUK IriH/ 


1 S1 Wednesday 




Arts Center 


7:00 p 


m. 


AbbliibbOKb, dUAKU Or 


Z" u lhursday 


o 
Z 


rp T T 1 "i 

lown Hall 


9:00 a 


m. 


LAK1 LK LLC 1 UKL r UJNL) 


As Needed 










L-EiiVlti 1 EjKY COMMlbblOJNfciKb 


A XT„^ An A 

As Needed 










COMMUN11Y DEVLLOFMLN 1 


A TH A If A 

4 1H Monday 


9 


rp tt n 

lown Hall 


9:30 a 


m. 


COJNbliiKVAl ION UOMMlbblON 


iCT p ORn \\7 ~ A~~ n A*-.* 

1 S1 & 3 KU Wednesday 


9 


lown Hall 


7:00 p 


m. 


DlbABILlllEb, WILMINGION COMM. 


A XT J 1 

As Needed 










ELDERLY SERVICEb COMMlbblON 


3 KU lhursday 




Sr. Center 


1:30 p 


m. 


MNANCE COMMI1 1EE 


own rp j 

2 nd luesday 


9 


rp tt n 

lown Hall 


7:00 p 


m. 


ttt? A T rpTT T") /~~\ A "DTV i~vT7 

HEAL1 H, BOARD Or 


1 CT npn rp J 

l bl & 3 KU luesday 


9 


rp t t n 

lown Hall 


5:30 p 


m. 


UTOTADTri A 1 AAAIAf TOOTAAT 

HlblORlCAL COMMlbblON 


2 Monday 




tt j rp 

Harnden lavern 


7:30 p 


m. 


ITATTOTMn A T TmT T rf"\T1 TTI1\7 

HOUSING AU I HORI IT 


l bl lhursday 




Deming Way 


10:00 a 


m. 


T T /~\ T TOTXTn Ti A TimXTTlTl O TTTT1 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 


A XT J J 

As Needed 




rp tt 11 

Town Hall 






T T T"> T~l A T~l X 7 rPT~» T TOrFT? TT! CI 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


3 rd Tuesday 




T " 1_ 

Library 


7:00 p. 


m. 


OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 


As Needed 




Town Hall 






PERMANENT BUILDING COMM. 


As Needed 




Town Hall 


7:00 p. 


m. 


PLANNING BOARD 


1ST & 3RD Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 p. 


m. 


RECREATION COMMISSION 


1 st Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


5:00 p. 


m. 


REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 


Monthly 




Shaw. Tech. 


7:30 p. 


m. 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 


1 st Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


12:00p. 


m. 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


2 nd & 4 th Wednesday 


LIB 


High School 


7:00 p. 


m. 


SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 


2 nd & 4 th Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p. 


m. 


WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 


3 RU Thursday 


9 


Town Hall 


5:00 p. 


m. 



-176- 




o tt> tt* t? rn 

S1REE1 




T a<~\ /"I * mT /"V X T 

LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Acorn Drive 


£ 

Irom 


Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 


385 


1998 




Adams btreet 


irom 


If ' J 11 A a TV 1 fl ■ 

Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




A J 1 'J Oi j 

Adelaide btreet 


£ 

Irom 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




A a. " TV 

Agostino Drive 


r 

irom 


/~1 1 If 'ITT 

Gandali Way 


999 


1979 




A i_ " TV 

Agostino Drive 


from 


A A- ' TV * i IP 11 

Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


580 


1996 




All ' 1 

Aldrich Koad 


r 

irom 


Ol- 1 A a. TJ * 11 * T * 

bhawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


1894 




All T 

Allgrove Lane 


Irom 


Woburn btreet 


470 


1993 




Allgrove Lane 


from 


All T i-JJ J 

Allgrove Lane to dead-end 


430 


1996 




Allenhurst Way 


p 

irom 


Wl 1 C\ A 1 

Woburn Street 


1,161 


1994 




a n n i tv 

Allen Park Drive 


p 

irom 


■ ,1 • a A i Tl * i A 

b airmont Avenue to r airmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 


1984 


A 1 t T> J 

Amherst Koad 


£ 

from 


01_ 1 _ A a IP 11 

bhawsheen Ave. to end oi cul-de-sac 


1,500 


1996 




Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover btreet 


£ 

Irom 


A J T * j_ 1 1 TIT 1 fl . . 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Andrew Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 


435 


1985 




Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apache Way 


from 


Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 


1,675 


1998 




A 1 A A A 

Apollo Drive 


Irom 


/"II i ai Ti J a. T\ TV 

Charlotte Koad to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




A 1 J. T 

Appletree Lane 


£ 

irom 


/~i i a a fii i i rn a i t\ 

Chestnut btreet to 1 owpath Drive 


994 


1990 




A 1 A 

Arlene Avenue 


Irom 


CI 1 O a a a Till A 

balem btreet to Llla Avenue 


3,754 


1966 


1978 


Ashwood Avenue 


from 


A 1 O j a j 1 11 

Andover btreet thru cul-de-sac 


2,800 


1998 




Aspen Drive 


from 


TV 11 TV 1 a 1 11 

Russell Koad thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




A CI a. a 

Avon btreet 


from 


a a j. a ±i ii 

Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Ayotte Street 


p 

irom 


T.TT >ii A a /I j A 

Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Bailey Road 


from 


A 1 ttt . l a 1 i_ TV *1 TV 1 

Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Kd. 


165 


1998 




T> ' 1 TV J 

Bailey Koad 


Irom 


All 1 TV 1 a 1 ,1a ti * 1 ti j 

.Aldrich Rd. southeasterly to Bailey Kd. 


538 


1999 




Baker Street 


from 


TV 1 A i 1 1 TV1 * 1 1 * A 

Brand Avenue to beyond rhillips Ave. 


684 


1945 




Baker Street 


from 


Tl i • TV 1 rii a 

Existing Baker btreet 


135 


2001 




Baland Road 


from 


TV 11 1 1 i a 

Ballardvale btreet 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 


1985 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birch Road 


from 


Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 


345 


1999 




Tj ' __L. „ J T> J 

Birchwood Koad 


£ 

irom 


Ol. J T TV 

Shady Lane Drive 


i,iy / 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Blanchard Road 


from 


Kendall Road 


625 


1989 




Blueberry Lane 


from 


Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


1,600 


1998 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 





-177- 



b l Ktibj i 




L.UUA1 1UN 


LENG 1 H 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 




1955 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 




1 0*7 1 

19/1 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1 AC 1 

lybl 




Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Ave to beyond Norfolk Ave. 


1,411 


1 OCT 




Castle Drive 


from 


Burlington Ave left to Burlington Ave 


1,325 


1 OOT 

iyy / 




Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


lybb 




Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1 O A C 




Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


iyb.3 




Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1 OCA 




Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


iyo / 




Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


i nri 

iyoi 


1 OT 1 

19/1 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


859 


1971 




Cha^p Road 


from 


Hathawav Road 


297 


195o 




Cherokee Lane 


from 


Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 


812 


1 ooo 

lyyy 




Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1 OA J 

1894 




Chisholm Way 


from 


Mink Run to end of cul-de-sac 


427 


O M M O 




Church Strppt 


from 


Main Strppt to Middlpspx Avpnup 


4,285 


1 QQA 

lo94 




Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


i on a 

1894 


19b9 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1 OTO 

1979 




Colonial Dnvp 

VulVlllUl 1 ' 1 I V V. 


from 


rVTidHlp^px Avpnup thru f*iil-np-sflr 


375 


199 / 




Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


194 / 




Columbia Street 


from 


Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


19U8 


19oo 


Concord Strppt 

\JUllvvl VI ►— ' ul ^/vli 


from 


Fpdpral Strppt to North Rpadint? Linp 

X \.\(V. 1 111 i ' L 1 V. V, X. VV i 1U1 1/11 IVVUVllllg U111V- 


5,803 


t on A 

1894 




CoriPTPc;^ Strppt 

VUilgl COO +~J IICCI 


from 


T^orpc;t Stvppt to RnvlinP"ton T/inp 

X v ' 1 V k ' I t S L 1 V V. L' IV l^Ul llllCLA/11 1J11R 


977 


19o9 




Cook Avpnup 


from 


Main Strppt 

ill (1 1 1 1 i 'LI V V I 


813 


1 O A C 

194b 




Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 




Corpv Avpnup 


from 


Canal Strppt to Grand Strppt 

(111(11 t .' LI V. V. L VV V ' X L( 1 1 V 1 K I V. V V. 


366 


1951 




Cornell Place 


from 


Fordham Road 


747 


1982 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Cottonwood Circle 


from 


Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 


280 


1998 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 




Crystal Road 


from 


Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 


895 


1996 




Cunningham St. 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


1952 1953 


Cushing Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


990 


1993 




Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 




±J<X\ACXllV 1/ilVC 


irnm 

11 Ulll 


North Strppt to North Strppt 

1>IL»1H1 OUCCL LU 1>*J1L11 t . > 1 1 ». < I 


1,760 


1964 




T|£1\71G RociH 
l/a V In iVLfdU 


11 ulll 


TVTnin Strppt 


500 


1 OKO 

195Z 




Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 




Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


1971 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 




Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 




Dogwood Lane 


from 


Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 




Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 




Douglas Avenue 


from 


Palmer Way 


1,017 


1989 




Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1,560 


1959 


1971 



-178- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Drury Lane 


from Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 


Dublin Avenue 


from Main Street 


500 


1951 


Dunton Road 


from Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 


Eames Street 


trom Main Street to Woburn Street 


o,zUU 


i on a 

1894 


Earles Row 


from Route 62 


820 


1994 


Edward Road 


from Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 


450 


1947 


Elizabeth Drive 


from Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 


1 O A O 

l,o4o 


1999 


Ella Avenue 


from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


l,U4o 


197o 


Elwood Road 


from Forest Street 


b4Z 


1 aCO 

iybo 


Emerson Street 


from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


5y(J 


iy5i 


Emerald Avenue 


from Andover St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


a aa 
4UU 


zuuu 


Englewood Drive 


from Kenwood Drive 


/ICC 

455 


iy /i 


Evans Drive 


from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


O fill 

Z,U / 1 


1 an i 

iy / 1 


Everett Avenue 


from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 


A QA 

4oU 


i ana 

iy /y 


Fairfield Road 


from Main Street 


1 OQQ 

i,zyy 


iy4b 


Fairmeadow Road 


from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


Z,oZo 


iy5o 


Fairmont Avenue 


from Molloy Road 


y5z 


i an i 

iy / 1 


Fairview Avenue 


from State Street 




inoo 

tyoo 


Faneuil Drive 


from Mass. Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 


/yu 


iy5u 


Faulkner Avenue 


from Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1 CM £! 


1 aA a 

iy44 


Faulkner Avenue 


from Faulkner Ave northeasterly to dead end 


1Z5 


tyyy 


Fay Street 


from Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


1 1 A 

1 14 


1 OQQ 


Federal Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


K 1 A(\ 
5, / 4U 


1 QQA 

ioy4 


Fenway Street 


from Rollins Rd to end of cul-de-sac 


Q7£ 
O ID 


ZUU4 


Ferguson Road 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


L,U / o 


iyb / 


Fernbanks Road 


from Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 


55U 


tyyb 


r lagstall Koad 


from Nichols Street 


5o / 


1 QQQ 

iyoy 


Fletcher Lane 


from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 


Floradale Avenue 


from Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 


Flynn Way 


from Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 


can 
boU 


iyyb 


Foley Farm Road 


from Kilmarnock Street to end of cul-de-sac 


QUO 


onrM 

ZUU<4 


Fordham Road 


from North Reading Line 


Q 71 A 
O, / 14 


1 Q71 

iy / 1 


r orest btreet 


from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


a 1 nn 
4, 1UU 


1 QQA 

Ic5y4 


r ox Run Drive 


trom High Street 


y ID 


1 QQQ 

iyoy 


Franklin Avenue 


from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


7QQ 

/ oy 


1 Q7Q 

iy / o 


Frederick Drive 


from Salem Street 


1,U /u 


1 QCC 

iybb 


Freeport Drive 


trom Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


o dq£ 

Z,Uob 


1 Q7Q 

iy /y 


/~1 „ J IP ITT 

Gandall Way 


trom Glen Road to Agostino Drive 


KA Q 

54y 


1 Q7Q 

iy / y 


Gatehouse Lane 


trom lowpath Road 


ooU 


1 QQA 

iyy4 


/"I A. Hi i 

Gearty Street 


trom Ring Avenue 


bZ / 


1 QQQ 

iyoy 


Glen Road 


trom Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


b,o IV 


1 QQA 

ioy4 


Glendale Circle 


trom Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


l,oU4 


iyoz 


Glenview Road 


from Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 


Gloria Way 


from Broad Street 


770 


1989 


Gowing Road 


from Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 


Grace Drive 


from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 


Grand Avenue 


from Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 


Grant Street 


from Federal Street 


780 


1943 


Great Neck Drive 


from Woburn Street 


536 


1989 


Grove Avenue 


from Main Street to Lake Street 


4,147 


1910 


Grove Street 


from Reading Line 


120 


1957 


Gunderson Road 


from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1959 




-179- 







STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Hamlin Lane 


from Lawrence otreet 


c a n 
04U 


1962 






Hanover Street 


from Atlantic Avenue 


en a 

0/4 


1988 






Hanson Road 


from Woodland Road 


QQQ 

ooo 


1969 






riardin otreet 


from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


AOQ 


1951 






Harnden Street 


from Main Street to Glen Road 


bUU 


1895 






Harold Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 




1971 






Harris Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


ollb 


1945 






Harvard Avenue 


from Main Street to River Street 


a on 
4oU 


1951 






Hathaway Road 


from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


o,Z lu 


1951 


1953 


1959 


Hawthorne Road 


from Woburn Street 


230 


1956 






Heather Drive 


from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 






Henry L. Drive 


from Woburn Street 


bol 


1993 






High Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 






Hillside Way 


from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 






Hilltop Koad 


from Suncrest Avenue 


ob4 


1959 






Hobson Avenue 


from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


l,ObU 


1945 


1951 


1952 


Hopkins Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


o,Uol 


1894 


1972 


1975 


Houghton Road 


from Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1, IUZ 


1985 






Industrial Way 


from Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 






Isabella Way 


from West Street 


385 


2001 






Jaquith Road 


from Shawsheen Avenue 




1938 


1949 


1951 


Jere Road 


from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1 O A Q 


1968 






Jewel Drive 


from Eames Street 


1 QAQ 


1985 






Jones Avenue 


from Glen Road 


71 7 
III 


1940 






Jonspin Road 


from Andover Street 


d,oUU 


1993 






Juditn Koad 


from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


a nn 
4UU 


1953 






Kajin Way 


from Woburn Street 


455 


1989 






Kelley Road 


from Chandler Road 


923 


1957 






Kendall street 


from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


i a on 
l,4zU 


1945 






Kenwood Avenue 


from Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


1, /ZD 


1970 


1971 




Kiernan Avenue 


from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


ovo 


1958 






Kilmarnock Street 


from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1 Q 1 A 

l,o4U 


1894 






King otreet 


trom (alen Koad to Broad otreet 


Z,4UU 


1940 


1945 




King otreet Lxt. 


trom (jlen Koad 


4o / 


1979 






Kirk otreet 


from Main Street 


/o 


1951 






T t Oj i 

Lake otreet 


from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


o ore 

o,ooo 


1894 






Lang otreet 


£ "D _ - . . £> Hi „ i 

trom Bancroft Street 




1952 






Laurel Avenue 


trom Parker otreet to Molloy Koad 


boy 


1950 






Lawrence Court 


£■_ T— — — Oi. i. 

trom Lawrence otreet 


/ZO 


1956 






T Oi. a. 

Lawrence otreet 


trom Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4, Old 


1956 






T 1 j "T> j 

Ledgewood Road 


trom Suncrest Avenue 


ooo 
ooo 


1959 






T J T 

Leonard Lane 


£ XT 1 ' Hi ii 1 £ I J „ 

trom Hopkins Street to end ot cul-de-sac 


54U 


2011 






Lexington Street 


from Cunningham St. to Morningside Dr. 


71 /I 
/ 14 


1974 






Liberty Street 


from Federal Street 


740 


1943 






Lincoln Street 


from Federal Street 


720 


1943 






Linda Road 


from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 






Lloyd Road 


from Main Street 


1,050 


1951 






Lockwood Road 


from Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 






Longview Road 


from Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 






Lorin Drive 


from Swain Road 


560 


1992 






Loumac Road 


from Drury Lane 


510 


1963 







-180- 



STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Lowell Street 


from Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 




1 Q7H 


Lowell St. Park 


from Lowell Street 


580 


1 QH8 


i ifo I l sort 


Lucaya Circle 


from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1 Q7Q 




Mackey Road 


from Federal Street 


250 


1 CM 1 




Magazine Road 


from Wisser Street 


320 


I v 1 o 




Magazine Street 


from Taplin Avenue 


190 






Main Street 


from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1 8CM 




Manning Street 


from Aldrich Road to Moore Street 


970 


9009 




Marcia Road 


from North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2,806 




1 (47 1 


Marcus Road 


from Gowing Road 


2,315 






Marie Drive 


from Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1 9G1 


1 QKR 
1 cJOO 


Marion Street 


from Burlington Ave. to beyond Clifton St. 


1,876 


1 U 1 R 




Marion Street 


from Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 






Marion Street 


from Marion St. southeasterly to Marion St. 


1,133 


9<inn 
zuuu 




Marion Street 


from Marion St. southerly an additional 


950 


9nni 




Marjorie Road 


from Main Street 


1,392 


LVD 1 




Massachusetts Ave. 


from Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1 QAX. 
1 V*iD 




McDonald Road 


from Salem Street 


2,621 


1 944 




Meadow Lane 


from Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1 Q^7 

l VO 1 




Meadow Lane 


from Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


1 997 

LW 1 




Melody Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 






Meadow Brook Rd. 


from Factory Rd. southeasterly 


204 


2001 




Middlesex Avenue 


from Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1 894 




Miles Street 


from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Mill Road Ext. 


from Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 


725 


2011 




Miller Road 


from Glen Road 


638 


1 94<i 




Molloy Road 


from Lowell Street 


988 


9001 




Moore Street 


from Shawsheen Ave to beyond Wedgewood Ave 


1,528 


1 9fi7 

J- i/VJ 1 




Moore Street 


from Existing Moore Street 


630 


9001 




Morgan Road 


from Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1 977 




Morningside Drive 


from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1 Q74 

Ij 14 




Morse Avenue 


from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 






Mystic Avenue 


from Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 




1 988 


Nassau Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 




Navajo Drive 


from Chestnut Street thru cul-de-sac 


585 


2006 




Nelson Way 


from High Street thru cul-de-sac 


800 


9009 




Nichols Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1 894 




Nickerson Avenue 


from West Street 


953 


1947 




Norfolk Avenue 


from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1 954 




North Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1 94=1 




N. Washington Ave. 


from Agostino Drive 


858 






Nottingham Drive 


from Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 




Nunn Road 


from Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Olson Street 


from Church Street 


122 


1957 




Oxbow Drive 


from Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 





-181- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTHDATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Palmer Way 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 


Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4,180 


1895 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2,000 


1919 


Patches Pond Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1,185 


1990 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


Pilcher Drive 


from 


the end of Gearty Street 


410 


1989 


Pilling Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avptiup 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1,364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Cir. 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Presidential Drive thru cul-de-sac 


768 


1998 


Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 


Q^uaii Run 


trom 


W7 U Oi i 

Woburn Street 


500 


1992 


Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 


Reading Avenue 


from 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 


Reading Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead-end 


160 


1997 


Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 


Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 


1,090 


1971 


Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


1,817 


1989 


Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


453 


1962 


Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1,861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 



Sachem Circle 


from 


Elizabeth Drive thru cul-de-sac 


520 


2005 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from 


No. Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 


6,475 


1894 


Sarafina's Way 


from 


Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


450 


1995 


Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


Seneca Lane 


from 


Tacoma Drive to Tacoma Drive 


1,065 


2002 


Seneca Lane 


from 


Tacoma Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


530 


2004 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sequoia Drive 


from 


Cherokee Lane to end of cul-de-sac 


1,152 


2008 


Serenoa Lane 


from 


Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1999 


Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richmond St. to Billerica Ln. 


11,845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Ave. 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 



-182- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTHDATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Somerset Place 


from Mystic Avenue easterly thru cul-de-sac 


878 


2000 


Sparhawk Drive 


from Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 


Sprucewood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


Stonehedge Drive 


from Castle Dr. northerly thru cul-de-sac 


1,400 


1997 


Strout Avenue 


from Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 


Taplin Avenue 


from Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Tern nip Street 


from Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracy Circle 


from Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


Truman Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Unnamed Street 


from Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 


Wakefield Avenue 


from Buckingham St. easterly to dead end 


355 


1999 


Walker Street 


from Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from Moore Street 


476 


1967 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from Wedgewood Ave. southeast thru cul-de-sac 


75 


1997 


West Street 


from Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



-183- 



) 

* * For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 




Telephone Number 


-rt-L-LU U 11 Id 11 1 




694-2029 




X^.Illllld.1 V,-'UUUU1 




658-5071 


(Complaints) 






658-7845 


(Missing/Adoption 


fiuycoio JJUaiu 




658-4531 




Avfc (IpritPV 

ill Lo V. C 11 U 1 




657-3887 




A ccoccnv 




658-3675 




RinlnTnc Tn^ripplriT* 

U Ulllllllg Alio IJ LUX 




658-4531 




(iPinptPi'v Hprnavtmpnt 
vciiic ici y x_/c lj ai 1 1 in ii i 




658-3901 




v^UlltiUtUl Ul 1 aAco 




658-3531 




n 1 Hoflv sdv\.'i na c 
1_jH1"11j< ucl vltco 




657-7595 




H ncrinppv 
11* lit; 1 litre* I 




658-4499 




pivp i)pti Q vt in prl 

J. 111 i-J CJJal I 111 CI 1 L 




658-3346 


(Business Phone) 






9-1-1 


(EMERGENCY) 


1 11 c x IcvtrllLlUll 




694-2006 




HarTi npn Tavpvn A/In qpii tyi 

1 litl Hurl] 1 a V Cl 11 IMLlOt Lllll 




658-5475 




XlcdlLll, DUalll Ul 




658-4298 




JTlUllslIlg rYULllUllty 




658-8531 




T inva w 




658-2967 




im urse 




658-4298 




x lanning/oonservatiun 




658-8238 




Plum nincr T ri miprtnr 

X XUlXXUXllg X XXo^JCL. LLFX 




658-4531 




i UllCc Utjpdl tlxlcllL 




658-5071 








Q 1 1 


i V W V R (I IT VT\> 
^IMVlHi jvvjrJCirN I ) 






657-8368 


(TDD) 


Public Buildings Department 




658-3017 




X^uUllL VVUlHo ±Jxi\)Al LUlcIlL 




658-4481 




Recreation Department 




658-4270 




School Department 




694-6000 




Selectmen, Board of 




658-3311 




1UWI1 V lei K 




658-2030 




lOWIl IVldllclgcx 




658-3311 








694-1417 


(TDD) 


Treasurer 




658-3531 




Tree Department 




658-2809 




Veterans' Agent 




694-2040 




Water & Sewer 




658-4711 








658-3116 


(Billing) 


Food Pantry 




658-7425 




Shawsheen Tech 




667-2111 




WCTV 




657-4066 




Comcast 


888 - 


633-4266 




Keyspan 


800 - 


548-8000 




Mosquito Control 


508 - 


393-3055 




Reading Light Dept. 


781 - 


944-1340 




Transitional Services 


800 - 


249-2007 




Verizon 


888 - 


438-3467 





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